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Thread: Men's Fertility Decreases After 35

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    Men's Fertility Decreases After 35

    Men's fertility decreases after 35

    * Kate Benson
    * July 7, 2008

    It has long been known that a woman's chance of reproducing declines once she hits 35, but now scientists have found that men who have some forms of fertility treatment in their 30s suffer the same fate.

    A study by Laboratoire d'Eylau, a centre for assisted reproduction in Paris, followed more than 21,000 men who had intrauterine inseminations at fertility clinics. It found the process, where semen is washed to extract the sperm, resulted in a decrease in pregnancies and an increase in miscarriages.

    All the men in the study, which will be presented today at the annual conference of the European Society for Human Reproduction and Embryology, were aged over 35.

    "We already believed that couples where the man was older took longer to conceive," said the study's author, Stephanie Belloc.

    "But how DNA damage in older men translates into clinical practice has not been shown up to now. Our research shows for the first time that there is a strong paternal age-related affect on [intrauterine insemination] outcomes and this information should be considered by both doctors and patients in assisted reproduction."

    She said sperm with DNA damage, common in older men, could still enter the egg during intrauterine insemination, which could result in a failure to conceive or a miscarriage.

    But during in vitro fertilisation, the zona pellucida, or outer membrane of the egg, was an efficient barrier in preventing the penetration of sperm with DNA damage.

    "And in ICSI [intracytoplasmic sperm injection], the best sperm can be selected for use. These methods, although not in themselves a guarantee of success, may help couples where the man is older to achieve a pregnancy more quickly and reduce the risk of miscarriage," Dr Belloc said.

    She followed 21,239 patients, and examined the sperm of each partner for count, motility and morphology. Pregnancy rates, miscarriage and delivery rates were also recorded.

    "Some recent studies have established a relationship between the results of [intrauterine insemination] and DNA damage, which also correlated to a man's age, suggesting it might be an important factor, but until now there was no clinical proof. We have now found that the age of the father was important in pregnancy - men over 35 had a negative effect."
    Source :
    http://www.essentialbaby.com.au/pare...0707-32zu.html

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    And yet, both Charlie Chaplin and Tony Randall fathered children after the age of seventy. Makes sense, evolutionarily: the reproductive costs for a male amount to a few trifling cells, as opposed to the huge biological costs for a female. Plus, older men might be better providers, hence the May-December romances one sees all around and throughout history.

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    Don't panic Octothorpe. :p What the article above discloses is that gamete degradation increases with age in men... culminating to the point where after the age of 35, gamete quality is reduced to the point of causing significant increases in genetic abnormalities in embryos (leading to increased incidences of miscarriage in the female) and also to delayed fertility (ie, it taking longer to conceive a healthy child).

    It doesn't mean that a man above 35 can't father a healthy baby, it just means that it often takes significantly longer to conceive one, and then the chances of genetic abnormalities is increased somewhat. But this is no reason for men over 35 to think that they can't father healthy babies. This is only talking about % chances and generalisations.


    Makes sense, evolutionarily: the reproductive costs for a male amount to a few trifling cells, as opposed to the huge biological costs for a female.
    Regardless of what seems to make sense to us mere mortals , nature will have its own way.... and there are no exceptions to the rule.... with age comes cellular degeneration. This affects all life forms... male and female.


    Plus, older men might be better providers, hence the May-December romances one sees all around and throughout history.
    I assume you're talking about very large age gaps in marital couples? Old men and young girls? Well, one could see other, more socially oriented explanations for this that would seem to make more sense.... from younger men being needed for battle and defense, or hunting, and therefore often needing to travel far from home, whereas the old men (those who survive their youth) are more free to be at home and devote their time to making babies and such... to traditionally patriarchal societies where females are used for making babies, menial household chores and sexual pleasure, with very few rights of their own, nor with any consideration for their own happiness and needs.

    The trends for these sorts of families... old man + young girl (particularly evident in countries/times when women had no real rights of their own)... wouldn't seem to have a biological cause. What makes most biological sense is for young men and women at the peak of their fertility to have babies. This incidence of large age gaps among married couples seems to be a socially determined phenomenon... most often based on the exploitation of one group of society by another group of society.

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    Scientists warn that biological clock affects male fertility

    · Deteriorating sperm is key factor from mid-30s on
    · Delaying fatherhood linked to miscarriages


    The biological clock ticks for men as well as women, doctors warn today, after research found that male fertility begins to decline when they reach their mid-30s.

    Doctors said men who wait until their 40s before starting a family face a greater chance of their partner having a miscarriage, because of the poorer quality of their sperm.

    Researchers examined patient records of more than 12,000 couples treated at a fertility clinic in Paris, and separated out the influence of male and female ages on the couples' chances of having a baby.

    They found that women whose partners were 35 or older had more miscarriages than those who were with younger men, regardless of their own age. The men's ages also affected pregnancy rates, which were lower in the over-40s.

    Doctors have long known that a woman's fertility drops sharply in her mid to late 30s, but the effect of age on male fertility is less well understood. Among women, miscarriage rates typically double to 40% between the ages of 20 and 40.

    The findings are a concern, researchers say, because of the trend for men to delay fatherhood. The latest figures from the Office for National Statistics show the typical age of married fathers rose from 29.1 in 1971 to 34.1 in 2003. The age of men having children outside marriage has remained stable at about 30. And, for the first time, more women in Britain are giving birth in their early 30s than in their late 20s.

    Yves Ménézo, an embryologist at the Eylau Centre for Assisted Reproduction, said older men become less fertile because genetic defects build up in their sperm. In younger men, the damage is minor and can be repaired inside the fertilised egg. But in older men the amount of DNA damage can overwhelm the body's natural repair mechanisms. "We think there's a critical threshold of DNA damage and above that, the damage can no longer be repaired. When that happens, genetic mistakes get through to the embryo and you get an increase in miscarriages," Ménézo said.

    The findings should cause fertility clinics to reconsider how they treat couples, Ménézo added. Those who fail to conceive after mild forms of fertility treatment, such as intrauterine insemination (IUI), in which sperm is washed and transferred directly into the uterus, should move quickly to more advanced treatments, such as ICSI, where the best quality sperm are picked out and injected directly into the woman's egg.

    The study looked at pregnancies and miscarriages recorded for couples having IUI treatment at the clinic between 2002 and 2006. It found the risk of miscarriage was on average 16.7% when men were aged 30-34. That rate rose to 19.5% when men were 35-39 and 33% in men aged 40 or over.

    Stéphanie Belloc, lead author of the study, which is due to be published in the journal RBM Online, said: "Until now, gynaecologists only focus on maternal age, and the message was to get pregnant before the age of 35 or 38 because afterwards it would be difficult. But now the gynaecologists must also focus on paternal age and give this information to the couple." She is to discuss her findings at the annual European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology meeting in Barcelona today.

    Jacques de Mouzon, a co-author at the French National Institute for Medical Research, said: "People say men are fertile into old age, 90 even. That may be true sometimes, but the product is different and there are more semen abnormalities as age advances. There is a decrease [in male fertility] and an increase in the spontaneous abortion rate after the age of 40 and especially after 45. It is necessary for men to try to have children before the ages of 40 to 45."

    Previous research has pointed to a slight increase in birth defects in babies born to older men. A 2005 study of 70,000 couples by epidemiologist Jorn Olsen at the University of California, Los Angeles, found a fourfold rise in Down's syndrome among babies born to men aged 50 and older. They were also more likely to have limb deformities.

    The chances of having a baby with Down's syndrome increase rapidly with a woman's age. About one in 1,000 babies born to mothers under 30 have it, a figure that rises to one in 400 by the age of 35 and one in 105 by the age of 40.

    "There is growing evidence from a number of studies to show that men are not totally immune from reproductive ageing," said Allan Pacey, an expert in male fertility at Sheffield University. "Previous studies of couples trying to conceive naturally or undergoing IVF have shown that men over the age of about 40 are less fertile than younger men."
    https://www.theguardian.com/society/...ealth.children

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    Richard Gere is a father again at age 70. The Chicago actor's 37-year-old wife, Alejandra Gere (née Silva), gave birth to their second child, a source confirms to Yahoo Entertainment. It's a baby boy — the name has not been revealed publicly — and the family is home bonding at Gere's estate in Pound Ridge, N.Y.

    https://www.yahoo.com/entertainment/...220528751.html



    According to wikipedia, Mick Jagger was 73 when his eighth child, a son, was born (2016).
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mick_Jagger#Children

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    It is a factor but negligible compared to what happens to women after 35.

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