View Poll Results: Should "degenerate" art be banned, in your opinion?

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  • Yes, it should be banned.

    42 37.17%
  • No, it shouldn't be banned.

    55 48.67%
  • Other opinion/I want to see the votes.

    16 14.16%
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Thread: Should "Degenerate Art" Be Banned?

  1. #111
    Senior Member Skärmträl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Terminus View Post
    Art was conceived to supersede suffering, not enable it. It should always be uplifting and ennobling.
    My point was not that art should enable suffering. In many cases I think people enjoy art of any kind because it acknowledges our experience (we recognize our lives in it) and then turn it into a learning experience, and then maybe, as you say, uplifts it or ennobles it.

    Scolding, threats, beatings, etc. do not inspire virtue. Virtue which rises out of fear and pedantic preaching merely reinforces egoism and increases contempt for the Christian religion. Schopenhauer and Voltaire have said as much.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uDSpkQ8U2Hs#t=1m26s

    A fuzzy little rabbit is obviously more relatable and helps cultivate an appreciation for wildlife and biology. The fables of Aesop (which even Luther acknowledged) have more merit than that of Homer's, opting to omit the monstrous sensationalism and prevailing superstitions of his times strictly for sound ethics
    Good for youngsters, I'm sure, but once we've grown up, reading Aesop (and the like) gets pretty effing dull. As adults, we can handle fear to a larger degree, and facing our fears is important for personal development. Of course, the scary element needs to be placed at some distance, we need to be in an otherwise safe environment in order to experience the sublime (yes, Burke). We need that balance, I think. We could even call it the Dionysian/Apollonian aspect to cover early Nietzsche as well.

    It is almost entirely devoid of form and prizes color.
    Art which goes beyond the figurative in order to play around with the abstract seems rather obsessed with form and its possibilities. If we stick with Kant, modern art seems more keen on exploring design than traditional art, not less.

  2. #112
    Senior Member Sigurdsson's Avatar
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    No. But clearly classical art and art with purpose or passion should be praised much more than the “degenerate art”.

  3. #113
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sigebrond View Post
    Under the assumption that it excludes art that's promoting paedophilia, bestiality, LGBT crap and so on, no, I am against censorship and regardless of how inept and tasteless modern art might seem, we should be the adults in the situation and put up with it.
    That sounds pacifistic to me. Pacifism means putting up with all kinds of unreasonable living conditions and demands in order to avoid upsetting the delicate sensitivities of others and disrupting the status quo.

    Adults don't look the other way. Art is a divine sphere, it's not the same issue as people practicing homosexuality in their private lives far away from the public eye.

    Jewish actors can get away with what they do, I appreciate them as much, but I can't say the same for Jewish filmmakers. The latter bears the greater responsibility.

    Quote Originally Posted by Skärmträl View Post
    My point was not that art should enable suffering. In many cases I think people enjoy art of any kind because it acknowledges our experience (we recognize our lives in it) and then turn it into a learning experience, and then maybe, as you say, uplifts it or ennobles it.
    Art isn't supposed to mirror or conform to our daily lives. It also isn't meant to replicate nature, but surpass it (i.e. Goethe's assessment of Rubens' paintings).

    Quote Originally Posted by Skärmträl View Post
    Good for youngsters, I'm sure, but once we've grown up, reading Aesop (and the like) gets pretty effing dull. As adults, we can handle fear to a larger degree, and facing our fears is important for personal development. Of course, the scary element needs to be placed at some distance, we need to be in an otherwise safe environment in order to experience the sublime (yes, Burke). We need that balance, I think. We could even call it the Dionysian/Apollonian aspect to cover early Nietzsche as well.
    I never tired of reading the Greek myths, even if they were monstrously distorted.

    Adults are still behaving like children. They stop learning when they graduate, very few will change their mind after they've settled on a comfortable view of life. No one has the right to call himself an adult until he has acquired a sense of proportion.

    Quote Originally Posted by Skärmträl View Post
    Art which goes beyond the figurative in order to play around with the abstract seems rather obsessed with form and its possibilities. If we stick with Kant, modern art seems more keen on exploring design than traditional art, not less.
    You call that form? Also, you haven't addressed it's obsession with color.

    Quote Originally Posted by Sigebrond View Post
    No more book burnings or "bonfire of the vanities", when you start burning books and art deemed inappropriate or unacceptable, eventually the definition of what is acceptable is going to become increasingly narrow.
    Even a great man like Plato considered going through with burning all of Democritus' books, foreseeing the disastrous consequences of one-sided materialism.

    Although you may have a point about the definition becoming arbitrary.

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