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Thread: Germanic Sculptors and Sculptures

  1. #21
    Senior Member Alpensun's Avatar
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    The Lion Monument (Löwendenkmal)



    The Lion Monument (Löwendenkmal), or the Lion of Lucerne, is a rock relief in Lucerne, Switzerland, designed by Bertel Thorvaldsen and hewn in 1820–21 by Lukas Ahorn. It commemorates the Swiss Guards who were massacred in 1792 during the French Revolution, when revolutionaries stormed the Tuileries Palace in Paris.

    Mark Twain praised the sculpture of a mortally-wounded lion as "the most mournful and moving piece of stone in the world."[1]

    Background

    From the early 17th century, a regiment of Swiss mercenaries had served as part of the Royal Household of France. On 6 October 1789, King Louis XVI had been forced to move with his family from the Palace of Versailles to the Tuileries Palace in Paris. In June 1791 he tried to flee abroad. In the 1792 10th of August Insurrection, revolutionaries stormed the palace. Fighting broke out spontaneously after the Royal Family had been escorted from the Tuileries to take refuge with the Legislative Assembly. The Swiss Guards ran low on ammunition and were overwhelmed by superior numbers. A note written by the King half an hour after firing had commenced has survived, ordering the Swiss to retire and return to their barracks.[2]Delivered in the middle of the fighting, this was only acted on after their position had become untenable.[3]

    Of the Swiss Guards defending the Tuileries, more than six hundred were killed during the fighting or massacred after surrender. An estimated two hundred more died in prison of their wounds or were killed during the September Massacres that followed. Apart from about a hundred Swiss who escaped from the Tuileries, the only survivors of the regiment were a 300 strong detachment which, with the King's authorization, had been sent to Normandy to escort grain convoys a few days before August 10.[4] The Swiss officers were mostly amongst those massacred, although Major Karl Josef von Bachmann — in command at the Tuileries —was formally tried and guillotined in September, still wearing his red uniform coat. Two surviving Swiss officers achieved senior rank under Napoleon.

    Memorial

    The initiative to create the monument was taken by Karl Pfyffer von Altishofen, an officer of the Guards who had been on leave in Lucerne at that time of the fight. He began collecting money in 1818. The monument was designed by Danish sculptor Bertel Thorvaldsen, and finally hewn in 1820–21 by Lukas Ahorn, in a former sandstone quarry near Lucerne. Carved into the cliff face, the monument measures ten meters in length and six meters in height.

    The monument is dedicated Helvetiorum Fidei ac Virtuti ("To the loyalty and bravery of the Swiss"). The dying lion is portrayed impaled by a spear, covering a shield bearing the fleur-de-lis of the French monarchy; beside him is another shield bearing the coat of arms of Switzerland. The inscription below the sculpture lists the names of the officers and gives the approximate numbers of soldiers who died (DCCLX = 760), and survived (CCCL = 350).[5]

    The monument is described by Thomas Carlyle in The French Revolution: A History.[6] The pose of the lion was copied in 1894 by Thomas M. Brady (1849–1907)[7] for his Lion of Atlanta in the Oakland Cemetery in Atlanta, Georgia.

    Mark Twain on the monument

    The Lion lies in his lair in the perpendicular face of a low cliff — for he is carved from the living rock of the cliff. His size is colossal, his attitude is noble. His head is bowed, the broken spear is sticking in his shoulder, his protecting paw rests upon the lilies of France. Vines hang down the cliff and wave in the wind, and a clear stream trickles from above and empties into a pond at the base, and in the smooth surface of the pond the lion is mirrored, among the water-lilies.

    Around about are green trees and grass. The place is a sheltered, reposeful woodland nook, remote from noise and stir and confusion — and all this is fitting, for lions do die in such places, and not on granite pedestals in public squares fenced with fancy iron railings. The Lion of Lucerne would be impressive anywhere, but nowhere so impressive as where he is.
    — Mark Twain, A Tramp Abroad, 1880
    Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lion_Monument

  2. #22
    Holiness is in right action, and courage on behalf of those who cannot defend themselves.
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    "Die Loreley Getan"

    Die Loreley is a rocky mountain in the bank of the Rhein and the mountain continues under the water, thus there are many underwater reef. This was a very dangerous place of ships till the German Authorities have arranged the river.



    Heinrich Heine fameous verse, "Die Loreley" is from the local stories about the rock. The Lorele is a very ancient, pre-German word, because the "ley" is a Keltic word to "stone". This mountain is Rheinland-Pfalz Province. In the other side is a beautiful female statue, "Die Loreley". This is gift from Natasha Alexandrowna Princess Jusoppow.






    "Remember that, even when those who move you be kings or men of power, your soul is in your keeping alone. When you stand before God, you cannot say, "But I was told by others to do thus,"or that virtue "was not convenient at the time." This will not suffice."
    /King Baldwin IV in the Kingdom of Heaven/

  3. #23
    Moderator Resist's Avatar
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    Friedrich Wilhelm Engelhard, Wotan Denkmal, Hannover



    Einar Jónsson, Thorfinn Karlsefni



    Rollon statue depicted among the 6 dukes of Normandy in the town square of Falaise



    Seattle's Leif Erikson memorial statue at Shilshole Bay Marina



    Trondheim, in the harbour: Viking overlooking the Strindfjord and Munkholmen.



    Minnesota, Leif Erikson by John K. Daniels



    Viking detail in Swansea Guildhall



    Viking Statue in Bergen Norway



    Viking Statue, Gimli, Manitoba



    Solfar (Sun Voyager) Sculpture, Reykjavík



    Sculpture in wood of a Viking


  4. #24
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    Otto Paul Rost, the Sculptor from Saxony

    Biography from German Art Gallery
    Otto Paul Rost (1887–1970), born in the city of Döbeln, was the son of a mill worker. Rost, who grew up in poor circumstances, was in 1901 apprenticed to a bridle-maker and, later, to a metal chaser in the Gustav Bühnert metal-wares factory in Döbeln. In 1909 he went to the Kunstgewerbeschule in Dresden where he studied under Prof. Hugo Spieler, Prof. Richard Guhr, Johannes Turk and Prof. Karl Gross. In 1914 he went into military service. Rost, who was promoted to corporal, fought in Lithuania against the Russians and later in Verdun against the French. In the autumn of 1918 he was taken as a prisoner of war in France; he was released in November 1919. From 1920 to 1923 he studied at the Art Academy in Dresden under Prof. Wrba. During this time he was commissioned to create a huge war memorial for the city of Döbeln, a large obelisk with at three sites a high relief of a soldier and two women. In 1923 he settled in Dresden, became a member of the Dresdner Artist Association and opened his own atelier. Over the next few years he took part in exhibitions in Dresden and other Saxon cities, as well as in Berlin, Bremen, Düsseldorf, Cologne and Munich. In 1933 he became a member of the NSDAP. A year later he was commissioned to create two larger than life-size sculptures for the building of the Justice Department in Leipzig: ‘Self-interest’ (‘Self-interest’) and ‘Gemeinnutz’ (‘Common good’). At the exhibition ‘Olympischer Kunstwettbewerb’ in Berlin, held in 1936 at the same time as the Olympic games, Otto Rost’s work ‘Rugbykampf’ (‘Rugby game’) received an honourable mention. Two years later he created ‘Grosse Kniende’ (‘Large kneeling woman’), a sandstone sculpture still located on the river bank of the Elbe in Dresden. In 1939 Rost became a teacher of sculpting at the Art Academy in Dresden, in which position he in fact succeeded Prof. Wrba. In 1942 Rost was awarded the ‘Alfred Rosenberg Preis’ for his sculptures Eigennutz and Gemeinnutz, which are still located in the building of the Cantonal Court in Dresden.

    At the Grosse Deutsche Kunstausstellungen, Rost was represented with 13 works including: ‘Junges Deutschland’ (GDK 1939), ‘Badende’ (GDK 1940, bought by the Reichsjugendführung), ‘Tuchbinderin’ (GDK 1941), ‘Psyche’ (GDK 1943) and ‘Badende’ (GDK 1943, bought by the Deutsche Arbeitsfront Berlin).

    In 1945, shortly after the Russians occupied Germany, Rost created the ‘Ehrenmal der Roten Armee’ (War Memorial for the Russian Army), placed at the Albertplatz in Dresden. For that reason the slightly damaged renowned fountain at that place, ‘Stürmische Wogen’ by Robert Diez, was removed (Stürmische Wogen was awarded the Gold Medal at the World Exhibition in 1900 in Paris). After the fall of the Berlin Wall, in 1994, Rost’s Russian war memorial was moved to another location in Dresden (Olbrichtplatz) and the Stürmische Wogen of 1875 was reconstructed in its original location. After the creation of the ‘Ehrenmal der Roten Armee’ in Dresden, the Russians commissioned Rost to create many more war memorials in Freiberg, Schwedt and in Czechoslovakia and Poland. In 1952 Rost created the well-known ‘Mauersberger Totentanz’, a relief of 10.12 meters in the Kreuzkapelle Mauersberg. In the same year, he created a copy of ‘Diana’ on the roof of Humboldt University in Berlin. This was a replecement of one of the six original 2.88-meter-high sandstone figures, created in 1749/50 on the orders of the Prussian king Friedrich II, and destructed during the war.

    Otto Rost died in 1970 in the city of Döbeln.

    Many sculptures, reliefs and war memorials by Otto Rost still exist in Saxony.









    Otto Paul Rost, the sculptor from Saxony
    http://www.renegadetribune.com/otto-...ulptor-saxony/

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    Senior Member Theunissen's Avatar
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    Wittekind monument in Herford:




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