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Thread: Foraging and Ethnobotany Links Page

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    Arrow Foraging and Ethnobotany Links Page


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    Senior Member Annikaspapa's Avatar
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    Post Re: Foraging and Ethnobotany Links Page

    Interesting link...

    Makes me wonder if there would be any interest in a gardening/farming/food-growing (sub)forum here...

    Any thoughts on the matter?

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    Post Re: Foraging and Ethnobotany Links Page

    Quote Originally Posted by Annikaspapa
    Interesting link...

    Makes me wonder if there would be any interest in a gardening/farming/food-growing (sub)forum here...

    Any thoughts on the matter?
    I use in my anthropological writings examples from the botanical world as metaphors to tackle in the simpliest but most deliberate way certain problems.
    I do like gardening and I enjoyed ever minute of it this morning and past noon when I was weeding, pruning, digging, mowing and moving shrubs and planting new summerflowers.
    So far I know from other members, I and SKADI are alone in our gardening hobby.

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    Post Re: Foraging and Ethnobotany Links Page

    Quote Originally Posted by Frans_Jozef
    ...I do like gardening and I enjoyed ever minute of it this morning and past noon when I was weeding, pruning, digging, mowing and moving shrubs and planting new summerflowers.
    So far I know from other members, I and SKADI are alone in our gardening hobby.
    Too bad - perhaps others may stumble across this thread and an interest in gardening take root and bloom

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    Post Re: Foraging and Ethnobotany Links Page

    Quote Originally Posted by Frans_Jozef
    Interesting and helpful site. Thank you!

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    Wink Re: Foraging and Ethnobotany Links Page

    Quote Originally Posted by Frans_Jozef
    I use in my anthropological writings examples from the botanical world as metaphors to tackle in the simpliest but most deliberate way certain problems.
    I do like gardening and I enjoyed ever minute of it this morning and past noon when I was weeding, pruning, digging, mowing and moving shrubs and planting new summerflowers.
    So far I know from other members, I and SKADI are alone in our gardening hobby.
    Count me in. I only eat wild, veggies, and fruit from my land.

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    Post Re: Foraging and Ethnobotany Links Page

    Quote Originally Posted by Frans_Jozef
    I use in my anthropological writings examples from the botanical world as metaphors to tackle in the simpliest but most deliberate way certain problems.
    I do like gardening and I enjoyed ever minute of it this morning and past noon when I was weeding, pruning, digging, mowing and moving shrubs and planting new summerflowers.
    So far I know from other members, I and SKADI are alone in our gardening hobby.
    I have a small vegetable garden which I had to clear from the forest. I have corn, spinich, brussel sprouts, tomatoes, potatoes, and squash. New World crops grow best here. I am interested in the ideas of Viktor Schauberger(as in "Living Water" by Olof Andersson) and Dr. Rudolf Steiner("Agriculture" by Steiner) concerning agriculture. I also raise earthworms for this garden.

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    Post Re: Foraging and Ethnobotany Links Page

    Regarding foraging: for a long time is suspended fishing. This is a cruel parctice and it really doesn't appeal to me to kill fish. But I eat fish. Fish are very good for people and the addition of fish to the diet may have been one of the big differences and a plus in survival between H. sapiens and Neanderthals. So, I have decided to resume fishing. But I only want to catch fish I will eat. There are streams and lakes here, even within walking distance. I don't know how this fits into the "foraging" discussion but it sounds similar to foraging to me.

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    Foraging,Gardening,Ethnobotany, Ecology

    I am none too skilled at finding threads but this one could be very exciting. I have studied these and other related fields for many years (decades) and planted my first garden when I was three (good grief that makes me 59 years old!!!!!!!!). Whether you forage (Mesolithic) or garden (Neolithic) it boils down simply to ecology. One either knows his habitat intimately and forages or is creating a habitat (a garden/ecosystem)and then foraging. Balance, balance, balance. Ecosystems contain a diversity of species. In most instances they grow in colonies not rows. These colonies have companions that perhaps repel insects, or improve soil content, might be trap crops for offending insects, others might attract beneficial insects. Think of your garden as an ecosystem, think about how soil is made in nature and enhance the process. For example, nature doesn't generally turn soil over (digging) she makes soil in layers. Many species of plants actually retrieve nutrients from the depths and return them to the surface; and blessed be the worms, they LOVE cornmeal. And don't forget the single-cell organisms. They single-handedly turn debris into soil; lets face it, without them we'd be knee-deep in poop and death. As complex as it might seem it really is just ecology. Many plants can be antagonistic to others, you will not persuade them to thrive side by side. Nor will a plant that has evolved in acidic soil ever make it in alkaline soil, etc. etc.

    So what does ecology have to do with ethnobotany? In antiquity we were communities (tribes) and we moved within specific habitats or ecosystems. We were a harmonious part of these systems and dared not exploit our surroundings as ultimately we would have perished from hunger. As we know our Earth and Her magic and mystery was the foundation of tens of thousands of years of deep, deep spirituality. It is my belief that gardening and foraging in the 21st century remains our deepest link to a time when we did not feel seperate from the Earth or each other.

    I don't want to go on and on (even though I could) and I would love to discuss in depth any and all aspects of this wonderful subject. It goes full circle with a post I made in response to "degenerating culture".

    Deepest regards,
    Verda Smedley

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