View Poll Results: How should ethnically mixed children (of Germanic or European backgrounds) be raised?

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  • They should adopt the culture of the father

    13 25.00%
  • They should adopt the culture of the mother

    5 9.62%
  • They should adopt the culture of the country or region they are raised in

    21 40.38%
  • They should adopt the culture of both partners

    6 11.54%
  • Other (please explain)

    7 13.46%
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Thread: How Should Ethnically Mixed Children (of Germanic or European Backgrounds) Be Raised?

  1. #11
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    I think it depends on where they live and which parent is mostly involved in their upbringing and education. I am a result of ethnic mixing, so to speak. My father is English and my mother is Romanian of Transylvanian Saxon background. However, my mother passed when I was really young so I didn't really get to know her and her culture too well. I was raised English however I've always felt a bit different, like the product of two cultures, not one. So I guess I'm more comfortable with a pan-European rather than an English only identity.

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  3. #12
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    Generally, country or region raised in. Aside from that if both parents are in the child’s life, it’s more beneficial to learn both sides than feel overzealous about one side exclusively.

  4. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Selene View Post
    I think it depends on where they live and which parent is mostly involved in their upbringing and education. I am a result of ethnic mixing, so to speak. My father is English and my mother is Romanian of Transylvanian Saxon background. However, my mother passed when I was really young so I didn't really get to know her and her culture too well. I was raised English however I've always felt a bit different, like the product of two cultures, not one. So I guess I'm more comfortable with a pan-European rather than an English only identity.
    But why do you feel "pan-European", instead of at least Germanic or half-English / half-German, especially considering you were raised only English and didn't even learn much about your mother's side anyway?


    Personally I think mixed Germanic individuals should simply fully assimilate (as far as possible) into that Germanic nation of their parents they grew up in and reside in primarily. No one can serve two masters.
    And the day they sold us out, Our hearts grew cold
    'Cause we were never asked, No brother, we were told!
    What do they know of Europe, Who only Europe know?



    Ancient DNA: List of All Studies analyzing DNA of Ancient Tribes and Ethnicities(post-2010)


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  6. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Juthunge View Post
    But why do you feel "pan-European", instead of at least Germanic or half-English / half-German, especially considering you were raised only English and didn't even learn much about your mother's side anyway?


    Personally I think mixed Germanic individuals should simply fully assimilate (as far as possible) into that Germanic nation of their parents they grew up in and reside in primarily. No one can serve two masters.
    Because I can't ignore my mother's genes and culture. Even if I didn't get to know her much, I still have this feeling of longing to find out more about her people and culture. But to answer your question, I also feel Germanic, of course I do, otherwise I wouldn't be here. The pan-European is just another extension of my identity, which isn't typically English. The English usually don't feel European, they rather have an own identity. Brexit showed that, for example. Personally, after having traveled and seen many European countries, I feel that I have more in common with other Europeans than I do with Colonials of English background like Americans, Canadians, etc. So I guess that makes me a bit unusual for an English person.

    I don't think you can force someone who is a product of several ethnicities to embrace only one identity. Even those like me, who grew up fairly monoculturally, still know that they're different. Of course you can have a dominant identity, at some point one language and culture will be preferred, usually the one where that person grows up and lives, but they're still going to know deep down who they really are. I don't wish to deny half of my heritage, if you know what I mean...

  7. #15
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    It's hard to argue that a child should forsake genetics of either or both parents in exchange for some cultural wardship of the state. That's not at all folkish; quite the opposite, really.

  8. #16
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    For people who come from multiple Germanic backgrounds, I think it's best if they adopt the culture of the country or region they live in. For example, a half Dane half German who is born and living in Denmark is better off raised as a Dane, they'll fit in better. But if they identify with their German side more they could count themselves as ethnic or "domestic Germans". Generally those people identify as Germans ethnically but hold Danish citizenship.

    In general it's better to have a main identity because eventually, everyone longs to have it and to be accepted by some group. It's one thing to also be interested in the culture of your ancestors. I have some distant German ancestry and it made me motivated to learn the German language for example. But my identity is 100% Danish, I wouldn't consider myself German. Ancestry is one thing, it's important and relevant when it comes to your genealogical line and we should honor our ancestors. Also having an interest in other Germanic cultures and languages can be healthy, the more one learns the better knowledge they have. But when it comes to identity at some point you'll have to make a choice, whether it's which sports team you support in a national event or which side you'd support in a time of war. Which language you think and dream in, what do you identify with most in your heart.

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  10. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Selene View Post
    Brexit showed that, for example. Personally, after having traveled and seen many European countries, I feel that I have more in common with other Europeans than I do with Colonials of English background like Americans, Canadians, etc. So I guess that makes me a bit unusual for an English person.
    It does, it's kind of weird. I don't think Admiral Arthur Phillip (1/2 German) or other individuals have had such issues in the past. I also know plenty of English people of 1/4 or 1/2 Irish or Welsh ancestry who have no such identity crisis. You're over-thinking it. You're never going to be German or accepted as such because you weren't raised in the culture and don't have much of a connection to it, apparently. Rather than alienate yourself from the culture you do have these connections to, I'd say you're best off just accepting assimilation. Otherwise you're forever an outsider who will never belong anywhere, and there are psychological issues that will come with this.

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  12. #18
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    Agreed with BoJ & leRoux. I'm quite happy about my 80% Germanic and 20% Celtic (according to MyTrueAncestry, although some YourDNAPortal results rates me higher Germanic) and enjoy the freedom of Anglosphere association, that welcomes Germanics of all kinds. Still, this means I relate closest to my grandparents' English roots and not as much with the German, Swedish and Dutch who came to occupy parts of my family tree further back, save for their places in the context of Englishness. Same goes for any Celtic Britons in my blood, but I find them more to be obstacles to English lebensraum than Germanics outside the realm, except that they agree to lebensborn assimilation.

    My family is mostly from the Danelaw (if Northumbria can be accounted part) so my initial understanding of what it means to be English wasn't exactly Anglo-Saxon, but still, that's who we fit among in the great scheme of things. Nevertheless, I have wished for the Kings of England to reunite with Denmark, Norway and Sweden, not just the Dutch and German aspirations for shaking off the humiliation of 1066. Selene can see her Transylvanian in a similar context to the Windsors' Saxon roots, so there's no need to feel at odds or chafe at the distance from Romania (think about their Saxon royal cousins of Bulgaria, lol).

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    Europe is different than the US since many Europeans have lived in a region for thousands of years. We're more like pioneers or settlers that expanded to other countries under various flags. Flags or nationalities don't necessarily give us our identities as one might experience living under British, Dutch, French, or Spanish colonial past empires. Some Americans may not even understand their multiple ethnic origins due to mass movements of people from Europe forced or voluntarily. Less than 36% of Americans are Anglo Saxon nowadays. I knew more of my German descent relatives in the Midwest that taught me a German identity, and I also lived in Germany for a few years. The few modern Celt relatives that I knew were nice and super religious. I never really had an identity struggle except for living among many nonwhites in major cities, but I experience more of a "disconnect" from main culture. US really has a short-term existence as a newer country with many Northern European immigrants. It is common here for many "Germans" to be ethnically mixed with German, Scandinavian, Scottish and/or Irish.

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