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Thread: On Friedrich Nietzsche's Philosopy

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    On Friedrich Nietzsche's Philosopy

    Friedrich Nietzsche

    This fellow’s philosophy has moved me more than any other‘s.

    In Thus Spake Zarathustra he says..

    I love him who scattereth golden words in advance of his deeds, and always doeth more than he promiseth: for he seeketh his own down–going.
    In Genealogy of Morals he says..

    “To breed an animal with the right to make promises—is not this the paradoxical task that nature has set itself in the case of man? is it not the real problem regarding man?”
    I offer these quotes because it seems “will to power” is selfish. Aren’t promises made to others?

    My wife once asked me “what do you get out of it”? All I could say is Will to Power!

    In Beyond good and Evil he says..

    “A living thing seeks above all to discharge its strength — life itself is will to power”
    His big ideas are..

    Eternal Recurrence

    Nietzsche calls the idea "horrifying and paralyzing," and says that its burden is the "heaviest weight" ("das schwerste Gewicht")[7] imaginable. The wish for the eternal return of all events would mark the ultimate affirmation of life:
    What, if some day or night a demon were to steal after you into your loneliest loneliness and say to you: 'This life as you now live it and have lived it, you will have to live once more and innumerable times more' ... Would you not throw yourself down and gnash your teeth and curse the demon who spoke thus? Or have you once experienced a tremendous moment when you would have answered him: 'You are a god and never have I heard anything more divine.' [The Gay Science, §341]
    To comprehend eternal recurrence in his thought, and to not merely come to peace with it but to embrace it, requires amor fati, "love of fate":[8]
    My formula for human greatness is amor fati: that one wants to have nothing different, not forward, not backward, not in all eternity. Not merely to bear the necessary, still less to conceal it--all idealism is mendaciousness before the necessary--but to love it.[8]
    In Carl Jung's seminar on Thus Spoke Zarathustra Jung claims that the dwarf states the idea of the Eternal Return before Zarathustra finishes his argument of the Eternal Return when the dwarf says, "'Everything straight lies,' murmured the dwarf disdainfully. 'All truth is crooked, time itself is a circle.'"
    The translation of Nietzsche's eternal return is from the German ewige Wiederkunft. The German word ewige also means perpetual. Though always translated as eternal it is worth noting this potential dual meaning.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eternal_return
    Will to Power

    The concept of the "will to power" appears in many of Nietzsche's works, and, although it has generated a range of interpretations, most scholars agree that it plays a role of at least some importance in Nietzsche's thought, as a principle that Nietzsche found very useful for explaining events in the universe--particularly human behavior.
    The concept is often understood as a response to Schopenhauer's notion of the "will to live." Writing a generation before Nietzsche, Schopenhauer deeply impressed Nietzsche with his proposal that the universe and everything in it is driven by a primordial will to live, which results in all living creatures' desire to avoid death and procreate. For Schopenhauer, this will is the most fundamental aspect of reality--more fundamental even than being. Nietzsche, however, argues that the will to live is actually subsidiary to the will to power: people and animals only want to go on living as a necessary condition for asserting their power on the world. In Nietzsche's own words, "Physiologists should think before putting down the instinct of self-preservation as the cardinal instinct of an organic being. A living thing seeks above all to discharge its strength — life itself is will to power; self-preservation is only one of the indirect and most frequent results" [1]. Here, Nietzsche thinks he is supported by the many instances in which people and animals are willing to risk their lives in order to promote their power (for example, ancient Greek heroes or "masters" often died young in battle, but achieved great power in the process). More generally, Nietzsche thinks his notion of the will to power is far more useful than Schopenhauer's will to live for explaining various events, especially human behavior--for example, Nietzsche uses the will to power to explain both ascetic, life-denying impulses and strong, life-affirming impulses in the European tradition, as well as both master and slave morality. He also finds the will to power to offer much richer explanations than utilitarianism's notion that all people really want to be happy, or the Platonist's notion that people want to be unified with the Good.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Will_to_Power
    Slave/noble morality

    Master-slave morality is a central theme of Friedrich Nietzsche's works, in particular the first essay of On the Genealogy of Morality. Nietzsche argued that there were two fundamental types of morality: 'Master morality' and 'slave morality'. Master morality weighs actions on a scale of good or bad consequences unlike slave morality which weighs actions on a scale of good or evil intentions. What Nietzsche meant by 'morality' deviates from common understanding of this term. For Nietzsche, a particular morality is the inseparable from the formation of a particular culture. This means that its language, codes and practises, narratives, and institutions are informed by the struggle between these two types of moral valuation. For Nietzsche, master-slave morality provides the basis of all exegesis of Western thought. With the Death of God morality became historical: it was created by mankind, not by a transcendent deity. The strong-willed man created morality by valuation.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Master-slave_morality
    And Superman

    I. THE THREE METAMORPHOSES.
    Three metamorphoses of the spirit do I designate to you: how the spirit becometh a camel, the camel a lion, and the lion at last a child.
    Many heavy things are there for the spirit, the strong load–bearing spirit in which reverence dwelleth: for the heavy and the heaviest longeth its strength.
    What is heavy? so asketh the load–bearing spirit; then kneeleth it down like the camel, and wanteth to be well laden.
    What is the heaviest thing, ye heroes? asketh the load–bearing spirit, that I may take it upon me and rejoice in my strength.
    Is it not this: To humiliate oneself in order to mortify one’s pride? To exhibit one’s folly in order to mock at one’s wisdom?
    Or is it this: To desert our cause when it celebrateth its triumph? To ascend high mountains to tempt the tempter?
    Or is it this: To feed on the acorns and grass of knowledge, and for the sake of truth to suffer hunger of soul?
    Or is it this: To be sick and dismiss comforters, and make friends of the deaf, who never hear thy requests?
    Or is it this: To go into foul water when it is the water of truth, and not disclaim cold frogs and hot toads?
    Or is it this: To love those who despise us, and give one’s hand to the phantom when it is going to frighten us?
    All these heaviest things the load–bearing spirit taketh upon itself: and like the camel, which, when laden, hasteneth into the wilderness, so hasteneth the spirit into its wilderness.
    But in the loneliest wilderness happeneth the second metamorphosis: here the spirit becometh a lion; freedom will it capture, and lordship in its own wilderness.
    Its last Lord it here seeketh: hostile will it be to him, and to its last God; for victory will it struggle with the great dragon.
    What is the great dragon which the spirit is no longer inclined to call Lord and God? “Thou–shalt,” is the great dragon called. But the spirit of the lion saith, “I will.”
    “Thou–shalt,” lieth in its path, sparkling with gold—a scale–covered beast; and on every scale glittereth golden, “Thou shalt!”
    The values of a thousand years glitter on those scales, and thus speaketh the mightiest of all dragons: “All the values of things—glitter on me.
    All values have already been created, and all created values—do I represent. Verily, there shall be no ‘I will’ any more. Thus speaketh the dragon.
    My brethren, wherefore is there need of the lion in the spirit? Why sufficeth not the beast of burden, which renounceth and is reverent?
    To create new values—that, even the lion cannot yet accomplish: but to create itself freedom for new creating—that can the might of the lion do.
    To create itself freedom, and give a holy Nay even unto duty: for that, my brethren, there is need of the lion.
    To assume the right to new values—that is the most formidable assumption for a load–bearing and reverent spirit. Verily, unto such a spirit it is preying, and the work of a beast of prey.
    As its holiest, it once loved “Thou–shalt”: now is it forced to find illusion and arbitrariness even in the holiest things, that it may capture freedom from its love: the lion is needed for this capture.
    But tell me, my brethren, what the child can do, which even the lion could not do? Why hath the preying lion still to become a child?
    Innocence is the child, and forgetfulness, a new beginning, a game, a self– rolling wheel, a first movement, a holy Yea.
    Aye, for the game of creating, my brethren, there is needed a holy Yea unto life: ITS OWN will, willeth now the spirit; HIS OWN world winneth the world’s outcast.
    Three metamorphoses of the spirit have I designated to you: how the spirit became a camel, the camel a lion, and the lion at last a child.—
    Thus spake Zarathustra. And at that time he abode in the town which is called The Pied Cow.

    http://ebooks.adelaide.edu.au/n/niet...67a/part4.html

    XXII. THE BESTOWING VIRTUE.
    1.
    When Zarathustra had taken leave of the town to which his heart was attached, the name of which is “The Pied Cow,” there followed him many people who called themselves his disciples, and kept him company. Thus came they to a crossroad. Then Zarathustra told them that he now wanted to go alone; for he was fond of going alone. His disciples, however, presented him at his departure with a staff, on the golden handle of which a serpent twined round the sun. Zarathustra rejoiced on account of the staff, and supported himself thereon; then spake he thus to his disciples:
    Tell me, pray: how came gold to the highest value? Because it is uncommon, and unprofiting, and beaming, and soft in lustre; it always bestoweth itself.
    Only as image of the highest virtue came gold to the highest value. Goldlike, beameth the glance of the bestower. Gold–lustre maketh peace between moon and sun.
    Uncommon is the highest virtue, and unprofiting, beaming is it, and soft of lustre: a bestowing virtue is the highest virtue.
    Verily, I divine you well, my disciples: ye strive like me for the bestowing virtue. What should ye have in common with cats and wolves?
    It is your thirst to become sacrifices and gifts yourselves: and therefore have ye the thirst to accumulate all riches in your soul.
    Insatiably striveth your soul for treasures and jewels, because your virtue is insatiable in desiring to bestow.
    Ye constrain all things to flow towards you and into you, so that they shall flow back again out of your fountain as the gifts of your love.
    Verily, an appropriator of all values must such bestowing love become; but healthy and holy, call I this selfishness.—
    Another selfishness is there, an all–too–poor and hungry kind, which would always steal—the selfishness of the sick, the sickly selfishness.
    With the eye of the thief it looketh upon all that is lustrous; with the craving of hunger it measureth him who hath abundance; and ever doth it prowl round the tables of bestowers.
    Sickness speaketh in such craving, and invisible degeneration; of a sickly body, speaketh the larcenous craving of this selfishness.
    Tell me, my brother, what do we think bad, and worst of all? Is it not DEGENERATION?—And we always suspect degeneration when the bestowing soul is lacking.
    Upward goeth our course from genera on to super–genera. But a horror to us is the degenerating sense, which saith: “All for myself.”
    Upward soareth our sense: thus is it a simile of our body, a simile of an elevation. Such similes of elevations are the names of the virtues.
    Thus goeth the body through history, a becomer and fighter. And the spirit—what is it to the body? Its fights’ and victories’ herald, its companion and echo.
    Similes, are all names of good and evil; they do not speak out, they only hint. A fool who seeketh knowledge from them!
    Give heed, my brethren, to every hour when your spirit would speak in similes: there is the origin of your virtue.
    Elevated is then your body, and raised up; with its delight, enraptureth it the spirit; so that it becometh creator, and valuer, and lover, and everything’s benefactor.
    When your heart overfloweth broad and full like the river, a blessing and a danger to the lowlanders: there is the origin of your virtue.
    When ye are exalted above praise and blame, and your will would command all things, as a loving one’s will: there is the origin of your virtue.
    When ye despise pleasant things, and the effeminate couch, and cannot couch far enough from the effeminate: there is the origin of your virtue.
    When ye are willers of one will, and when that change of every need is needful to you: there is the origin of your virtue.
    Verily, a new good and evil is it! Verily, a new deep murmuring, and the voice of a new fountain!
    Power is it, this new virtue; a ruling thought is it, and around it a subtle soul: a golden sun, with the serpent of knowledge around it.
    2.
    Here paused Zarathustra awhile, and looked lovingly on his disciples. Then he continued to speak thus—and his voice had changed:
    Remain true to the earth, my brethren, with the power of your virtue! Let your bestowing love and your knowledge be devoted to be the meaning of the earth! Thus do I pray and conjure you.
    Let it not fly away from the earthly and beat against eternal walls with its wings! Ah, there hath always been so much flown–away virtue!
    Lead, like me, the flown–away virtue back to the earth—yea, back to body and life: that it may give to the earth its meaning, a human meaning!
    A hundred times hitherto hath spirit as well as virtue flown away and blundered. Alas! in our body dwelleth still all this delusion and blundering: body and will hath it there become.
    A hundred times hitherto hath spirit as well as virtue attempted and erred. Yea, an attempt hath man been. Alas, much ignorance and error hath become embodied in us!
    Not only the rationality of millenniums—also their madness, breaketh out in us. Dangerous is it to be an heir.
    Still fight we step by step with the giant Chance, and over all mankind hath hitherto ruled nonsense, the lack–of–sense.
    Let your spirit and your virtue be devoted to the sense of the earth, my brethren: let the value of everything be determined anew by you! Therefore shall ye be fighters! Therefore shall ye be creators!
    Intelligently doth the body purify itself; attempting with intelligence it exalteth itself; to the discerners all impulses sanctify themselves; to the exalted the soul becometh joyful.
    Physician, heal thyself: then wilt thou also heal thy patient. Let it be his best cure to see with his eyes him who maketh himself whole.
    A thousand paths are there which have never yet been trodden; a thousand salubrities and hidden islands of life. Unexhausted and undiscovered is still man and man’s world.
    Awake and hearken, ye lonesome ones! From the future come winds with stealthy pinions, and to fine ears good tidings are proclaimed.
    Ye lonesome ones of to–day, ye seceding ones, ye shall one day be a people: out of you who have chosen yourselves, shall a chosen people arise:—and out of it the Superman.
    Verily, a place of healing shall the earth become! And already is a new odour diffused around it, a salvation–bringing odour—and a new hope!
    3.
    When Zarathustra had spoken these words, he paused, like one who had not said his last word; and long did he balance the staff doubtfully in his hand. At last he spake thus—and his voice had changed:
    I now go alone, my disciples! Ye also now go away, and alone! So will I have it.
    Verily, I advise you: depart from me, and guard yourselves against Zarathustra! And better still: be ashamed of him! Perhaps he hath deceived you.
    The man of knowledge must be able not only to love his enemies, but also to hate his friends.
    One requiteth a teacher badly if one remain merely a scholar. And why will ye not pluck at my wreath?
    Ye venerate me; but what if your veneration should some day collapse? Take heed lest a statue crush you!
    Ye say, ye believe in Zarathustra? But of what account is Zarathustra! Ye are my believers: but of what account are all believers!
    Ye had not yet sought yourselves: then did ye find me. So do all believers; therefore all belief is of so little account.
    Now do I bid you lose me and find yourselves; and only when ye have all denied me, will I return unto you.
    Verily, with other eyes, my brethren, shall I then seek my lost ones; with another love shall I then love you.
    And once again shall ye have become friends unto me, and children of one hope: then will I be with you for the third time, to celebrate the great noontide with you.
    And it is the great noontide, when man is in the middle of his course between animal and Superman, and celebrateth his advance to the evening as his highest hope: for it is the advance to a new morning.
    At such time will the down–goer bless himself, that he should be an over– goer; and the sun of his knowledge will be at noontide.
    “DEAD ARE ALL THE GODS: NOW DO WE DESIRE THE SUPERMAN TO LIVE.”—Let this be our final will at the great noontide!—
    Thus spake Zarathustra.


    http://ebooks.adelaide.edu.au/n/niet...a/part25.htmlm
    What do these things mean to you? If anything?

    Later,
    -Lyfing

  2. #2
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    Here is something of what they mean to me..

    What, if some day or night a demon were to steal after you into your loneliest loneliness and say to you: 'This life as you now live it and have lived it, you will have to live once more and innumerable times more' ... Would you not throw yourself down and gnash your teeth and curse the demon who spoke thus? Or have you once experienced a tremendous moment when you would have answered him: 'You are a god and never have I heard anything more divine.'
    All through life we are faced with countless actions and their consequences. There are things that I have done in seconds which has changed my life ( and others’ ) forever. There is a saying about life that goes something like “no regrets”. Some people talk of “going back in time” and changing this or that for whatever reason ( usually, it seems, because they regret it ). I would not change a single thing because to do so would change it all, and that would strip from me the most precious moments I have ever had.

    I also think repentance may be an opposite notion.

    "Physiologists should think before putting down the instinct of self-preservation as the cardinal instinct of an organic being. A living thing seeks above all to discharge its strength — life itself is will to power; self-preservation is only one of the indirect and most frequent results"
    The notion of “will to power” is awesome. A simple example of “will to power” I experience all the time is when I drop a tree. I can get killed doing this sort of thing. I get money a definite means of self-preservation these days for doing it. But that is not the only reason I do it. I do it because it makes me happy..

    What is happiness?--The feeling that power increases--that resistance is overcome. -The Antichrist
    When I was younger I read the bible, prayed The Lord’s Prayer, put on the Mind of Christ, and felt the Holy Ghost. Now God is Dead to me. No longer is there an absolute morality handed down from on high which I am to adhere to lest I be evil and eternally damned. I am beyond good and evil. I understand that good ( What is good?--Whatever augments the feeling of power, the will to power, power itself, in man. -The Antichrist ) is what the weak call evil. ( What is evil?--Whatever springs from weakness. -The Antichrist )
    Here is my most favorite quote in the whole world..

    Would anyone care to learn something about the way in which ideals are manufactured? Does anyone have the nerve?…Well then, go ahead! There’s a chink through which you can peek into this murky shop. But wait just a moment, Mr. Foolhardy; your eyes must grow accustomed to the fickle light…all right, tell me what’s going on in there, audacious fellow; now I am the one who is listening.

    “I can’t see a thing, but I hear all the more. There’s a low, cautious whispering in every nook and corner. I have a notion these people are lying. All the sounds are sugary and soft. No doubt you were right; they are transmuting weakness into merit.”

    “Go on”

    “Impotence, which cannot retaliate, into kindness; pusillanimity into humility; submission before those one hates into obedience to One of whom they say that he has commanded this submission--they call him God. The inoffensiveness of the weak, his cowardice, his ineluctable standing and waiting at doors, are being given honorific titles such as patience; to be unable to avenge oneself is called to be unwilling to avenge oneself--even forgiveness (“for they know not what they do--we alone know what they do.”)
    Also there’s some talk of loving one’s enemy--accompanied by much sweat.”

    “Go on”

    “I’m sure they are quite miserable, all these whisperers and smalltime counterfeiters, even thought they huddle close together for warmth. But they tell me that this very misery is the sign of their election by God, that one beats the dogs one loves best, that this misery is perhaps also a preparation, a test, a kind of training, perhaps even more than that: something for which eventually they will be compensated with tremendous interest--in gold? No, in happiness. They call this bliss.”

    “Go on”

    “Now they tell me that not only are they better than the mighty of this earth, whose spittle they must lick ( not from fear--by no means--but because God commands us to honor our superiors), but they are even better off, or at least they will be better off someday. But I’ve had all I can stand. The smell is too much for me. This shop where they manufacture ideals seems to me to stink of lies.”

    “But just a moment. You haven’t told me anything about the greatest feat of these black magicians, who precipitate the white milk of loving-kindness out of every kind of blackness. Haven’t you noticed their most consummate sleight of hand, their boldest, finest, most brilliant trick? Just watch! These vermin, full of vindictive hatred, what are they brewing out of their of poisons? Have you ever heard vengeance and hatred mentioned? Would you ever guess, if you only listened to their words, that these are men bursting with hatred?”

    “I see what you mean. I’ll open my ears again--and stop my nose. Now I can make out what they seem to have been saying all along ‘We, the good ones, are also the just ones.’ They call the thing they seek not retribution but the triumph of justice; the thing they hate is not their enemy, by no means--they hate injustice, ungodliness; the thing they hope for and believe in is not vengeance, the sweet exultation of vengeance (‘sweeter than honey’ as Homer said) but ‘the triumph of God’ who is just, over the godless’; what remains to them to love on this earth is not their brothers in hatred, but what they call their ‘brother in love’-- all who are good and just.”

    “And what do they call that which comforts them in all their suffering--their phantasmagoria of future bliss?”

    “Do I hear correctly? They call it Judgment Day, the coming of their kingdom, the ‘Kingdom of God.’ Meanwhile they live in ‘faith,’ in ‘love,’ in ‘hope.’”

    “Stop! I’ve heard enough.”

    From The Birth of Tragedy & the Genealogy of Morals translated my Francis Golffing..pages 180-182
    When I was a boy my Momma got me a set of encyclopedias. I asked her if I read them all if I would be as smart as Superman. Well of course she said yes. One of them was an index to the rest. I looked up Superman, seen Nietzsche for the first time, and put a Garfield Valentine’s Day card to book mark it. It is still there. Truly strange it is how some things happen. Anyway..

    In Thus Spake Zarathustra Nietzsche describes the three metamorphosis of the spirit “how the spirit becometh a camel, the camel a lion, and the lion at last a child.” It seems his whole philosophy is summed up in that one. One starts off as a camel carrying the burden of “thou shalt”, as I started of praying the Lord’s Prayer and upholding whatever was expected of me by society. In the wilderness the camel becomes a lion and says “I will”, as I ventured off in the wilderness of life outside of society which I felt out of place in ( kitties are curious ) and found the freedom to say “I will”. The lion “I will” kills the dragon “thou shalt” and becomes a child, as I said to heck with society and it’s mores, it is dead to me, I will create my own, do as I will, and be better off that way..

    ...

    Later,
    -Lyfing

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lyfing View Post
    All through life we are faced with countless actions and their consequences. There are things that I have done in seconds which has changed my life ( and others’ ) forever. There is a saying about life that goes something like “no regrets”. Some people talk of “going back in time” and changing this or that for whatever reason ( usually, it seems, because they regret it ). I would not change a single thing because to do so would change it all, and that would strip from me the most precious moments I have ever had.
    This is something that I have been contemplating of late also. All experiences, especially the bad ones have contributed significantly to whom I am today and what I know, something of which I value. To regret all the “bad” things in a sense is to regret who you are. You can dislike what happened and you can ensure you can overcome if it is ever to happen, so have you not learned a vital lesson?

    Quote Originally Posted by Nietzsche
    Physiologists should think before putting down the instinct of self-preservation as the cardinal instinct of an organic being. A living thing seeks above all to discharge its strength — life itself is will to power; self-preservation is only one of the indirect and most frequent results
    Indeed, there is obvious validity in this. It is why people dare to do things that are dangerous, as a sign of not just strength, but boldness also. If we were lead by self-preservation only we would never achieve anything and conquerors and empires would never have existed.

    Quote Originally Posted by Nietzsche
    What is happiness?--The feeling that power increases--that resistance is overcome.
    Certainly, the human mind, along with that of society has many weak elements to overcome. We have impulses and doubts which for the most part limit our potentials. Through moral dogmatism, to our of emotions; to overcome these is a step in the way to greatness.

    The camel > lion > child is a great example of the metamorphosis one goes through to become greater than man. The profound meaning to me is this:

    The camel bares his burden, the burden of the norms and what society tells of him. The camel becomes the lion, the lion veers from the norms and becomes what he wills to become. Then lion then destroys the norms with what he has become and the strength he now signifies, he destroys his own self-doubt and dependence and becomes a child, free to become what the lion desires with no inhibitions or interference.

    It signifies to me somewhat, my own view of how to save ourselves; to destroy the world and all its decadence and to build a new one from the ruins. For to destroy is also to create and there will always be the lingering weakness and degeneracy as long as we dwell in its shadow.
    "For the authentic revolutionary conservative, what really counts is to be faithful not to past forms and institutions, but rather to principles of which such forms and institutions have been particular expressions, adequate for a specific period of time and in a specific geographical area." Julius Evola - Men Among the Ruins

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    Here is a nice little essay..

    Nietzsche – the Overman and the Three Metamorphoses

    A Research Essay

    “I teach you the overman. Man is something that shall be overcome” – Zarathustra’s Prologue.

    The overman for Nietzsche is the truest, most pure form of humankind. This form can be achieved by humans only when and if they liberate themselves from 1) their internal
    thresholds and 2) the external thresholds. Deep down inside of every human is hidden the overman. The thresholds contain the restrictions made of ‘fixed patterns’ and I find there to be interdependence between the restrictions that both thresholds contain. To put it simply, an internal (self) restriction may have to be imposed because of an external (society’s) restriction in that regard.

    A human’s internal thresholds are the confinements of religion which are usually reinforced by teachings of morals and ethics. Belief in God, virtue and a fixed pattern of what is ‘right’ and ‘wrong’ in the eyes of the Supreme Power limits a human because of the fear of punishment. A human’s ‘true, actual’ self is repressed by fear. If some part of an overman emerges in a human in this regard, it is considered immoral. In ‘Letter to Overbeck’ Nietzsche writes of a girl who has premarital sex and how she’s considered to be contemptible:

    “A feeling (of sexual desire) is supposed to be subdued by a thought – more precisely, by the thought of fear…In itself, it is not at all shameful, but natural and fair, that a desire be satisfied immediately. Therefore what is really contemptible in this girl is the weakness of her fear”.

    The ‘true’ human possesses the Apollonian forces that create desire , a feeling. There’s no force that creates fear as a feeling for the ‘true’ human is fearless. Fear is therefore only a thought, in this case, a thought invoked by the society to the girl.

    The external or society’s thresholds are where the society deems them to be socially acceptable. This may be religiously and academically. The State, according to Nietzsche, used Christianity to “provide an excuse to people to accept suffering, poverty and being downtrodden” since Christian proverbs dictate that the rich will never enter heaven and the meek shall inherit the earth. Regarding education Nietzsche wrote that the ‘education’ being provided to the masses was merely to convert them into ‘slaves’ to work for the State and Businesspeople. These masses of ‘factory slaves’ work the same work day-in and day-out for other people instead of ‘working’ towards their ‘self-discovery’. With time they become “sick of themselves” and “degenerate into dangerous discontent and criminal tendencies” Nietzsche describes them in ‘The impossible class’:

    “…when you listen to the newspapers and leer at your rich neighbor, made lustful by the rapid rise and fall of power, money, and opinions? When you no longer have any faith in philosophy, which wears rags, and in the candor of those who have no wants?”

    Education, in its true sense, to Nietzsche starts when a human fights against internal and external thresholds and questions “Why?” It begins when humans behaving like entranced mice stop following the Pied Piper, and choose to go down different paths. The overman can only prevail when God (and the likes of him) is dead and when that age comes “which is to carry heroism into the pursuit of knowledge and wage wars for the sake of thoughts and their consequence” .

    The piece of writing which perhaps best describes the need and the inevitability of the prevalence of an overman is in ‘Letter to His Sister’. Nietzsche ends it by saying, “Here are the ways of men part: if you wish to strive for the peace of soul and pleasure, then believe (all that is taught to you); if you wish to be a devotee of the truth, then inquire…”

    In Zarathustra’s Speeches Nietzsche writes on the three metamorphoses of one’s spirit: from the camel to the lion and finally the child. I found this metamorphosis to be a fable of a human turning into an overman.

    The camel portrays the normal man, the spirit who learns all that is taught to him about God and societal norms. He carries this burden of imparted education leaving him no room to inquire and learn about the ‘truths’ he may want to question. It is interesting to note that a camel’s stride is slow and appears to require much effort. This is the life, the stride of a spirit, a ‘factory slave’, when internally and externally restricted.

    When it runs though, a camel is very fast and this burdened camel while running starts questioning “Why?” and transforms into a lion. The lion has been a symbol of bravery and a spirit as a lion will stand up to the lord/god who is depicted as a dragon in comparison which had burdened the lion in the first place. That dragon has the name of “Thou shalt” and thou shalt is the beginning of all and any restrictions, internal and external, which are imposed on humans. This is the becoming of the overman.

    Prevalence is achieved when the lion becomes a child. The struggle of becoming a lion from a camel is very difficult and the lion may become an outcast in the society, thus feeling lost in this world. When the child emerges though he comes with the liberty to question and believe whatever he wishes without any struggle. Thus the overman will prevail, the ‘true inquirer’.

    “The child is innocence and forgetting, a new beginning, a game, a self-propelled wheel, a first movement…the spirit now wills his own will, and he who had been lost to the world now conquers his own world” .

    http://www.chowk.com/articles/11844


    Later,
    -Lyfing

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    Friedrich Nietzsche: The Collected Works

    November, 1887 - March, 1888.

    I. Of what is great one must either be silent or speak with greatness. With greatness—that means cynically and with innocence.

    II. What I relate is the history of the next two centuries. I describe what is coming, what can no longer come differently: the advent of nihilism. This history can be related even now; for necessity itself is at work here. This future speaks even now in a hundred signs, this destiny announces itself everywhere; for this music of the future all ears are cocked even now. For some time now, our whole European culture has been moving as toward a catastrophe, with a tortured tension that is growing from decade to decade: restlessly, violently, headlong, like a river that wants to reach the end, that no longer reflects, that is afraid to reflect.

    III. He that speaks here, conversely, has done nothing so far but reflect: a philosopher and solitary by instinct, who has found his advantage in standing aside and outside, in patience, in procrastination, in staying behind; as a spirit of daring and experiment that has already lost its way once in every labyrinth of the future; as a soothsayer-bird spirit who looks back when relating what will come; as the first perfect nihilist of Europe who, however, has even now lived through the whole of nihilism, to the end, leaving it behind, outside himself.

    IV. For one should make no mistake about the meaning of the title that this gospel of the future wants to bear. “The Will to Power: Attempt at a Revaluation of All Values"—in this formulation a countermovement finds expression, regarding both principle and task; a movement that in some future will take the place of this perfect nihilism—but presupposes it, logically and psychologically, and certainly can come only after and out of it. For why has the advent of nihilism become necessary? Because the values we have had hitherto thus draw their final consequence; because nihilism represents the ultimate logical conclusion of our great values and ideals—because we must experience nihilism before we can find out what value these “values” really had.—We require, sometime, new values...

    Preface to The Will to Power


    "...The moral man is a lower species than the immoral, a weaker species; indeed - he is a type in regard to morality, but not a type in himself; a copy...the measure of his value lies outside him. ... I assess the power of a will by how much resistance, pain, torture it endures and knows how to turn to its advantage; I do not account the evil and painful character of existence a reproach to it, but hope rather that it will one day be more evil and painful than hitherto..." (Nietzsche)

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    Luckily, I have the Kaufmann/Hollingdale collaborative translation for "The Will to Power".

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    Quote Originally Posted by MockTurtle View Post
    Luckily, I have the Kaufmann/Hollingdale collaborative translation for "The Will to Power".
    Kaufmann, especially, was the source of some of the best translations of Nietzsche in so far as his ability to grasp Nietzsche's timbre and affect from the original German, and tranlate/transliterate into English - especially when Nietzsche is attempting to be more poetic than aphoristic; but oddly, the source of some of the worst analysis.

    The stand out translation, however, of Beyond Good and Evil (for one) is the pre-war work of Helen Zimmern. Available here: http://www.gutenberg.org/etext/4363



    Of course, if one can read the original German, and more importantly think in German, that is recommended: http://www.gutenberg.org/etext/7204
    "...The moral man is a lower species than the immoral, a weaker species; indeed - he is a type in regard to morality, but not a type in himself; a copy...the measure of his value lies outside him. ... I assess the power of a will by how much resistance, pain, torture it endures and knows how to turn to its advantage; I do not account the evil and painful character of existence a reproach to it, but hope rather that it will one day be more evil and painful than hitherto..." (Nietzsche)

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    Quote Originally Posted by SüüT
    Kaufmann, especially, was the source of some of the best translations of Nietzsche in so far as his ability to grasp Nietzsche's timbre and affect from the original German, and tranlate/transliterate into English - especially when Nietzsche is attempting to be more poetic than aphoristic; but oddly, the source of some of the worst analysis.
    Oh I agree completely. I've never thought that Kaufmann's analyses of Nietzsche's work(s) have been at all worthwhile. To me, he just seemed to be part of the whole trend to "liberalize" Nietzsche's views and make them more compatible with mainstream philosophical thought post-WWII, when it became clear (and still is) that many of Nietzsche's insights were in line with National Socialism.

    He's respectable as a translator though; I've also found Ludovici to be decent (I have his translation of the "Anti-Christ"). IMO, his analysis are also very useful.

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    My first Nietzsche book(s) was The Birth of Tragedy & The Genealogy of Morals translated by Francis Golffing. I read it in my 21st year. I don't know how great a translation it is, but the following words changed me life forever..

    Would anyone care to learn something about the way in which ideals are manufactured? Does anyone have the nerve?…Well then, go ahead! There’s a chink through which you can peek into this murky shop. But wait just a moment, Mr. Foolhardy; your eyes must grow accustomed to the fickle light…all right, tell me what’s going on in there, audacious fellow; now I am the one who is listening.

    “I can’t see a thing, but I hear all the more. There’s a low, cautious whispering in every nook and corner. I have a notion these people are lying. All the sounds are sugary and soft. No doubt you were right; they are transmuting weakness into merit.”

    “Go on”

    “Impotence, which cannot retaliate, into kindness; pusillanimity into humility; submission before those one hates into obedience to One of whom they say that he has commanded this submission--they call him God. The inoffensiveness of the weak, his cowardice, his ineluctable standing and waiting at doors, are being given honorific titles such as patience; to be unable to avenge oneself is called to be unwilling to avenge oneself--even forgiveness (“for they know not what they do--we alone know what they do.”)
    Also there’s some talk of loving one’s enemy--accompanied by much sweat.”

    “Go on”

    “I’m sure they are quite miserable, all these whisperers and smalltime counterfeiters, even thought they huddle close together for warmth. But they tell me that this very misery is the sign of their election by God, that one beats the dogs one loves best, that this misery is perhaps also a preparation, a test, a kind of training, perhaps even more than that: something for which eventually they will be compensated with tremendous interest--in gold? No, in happiness. They call this bliss.”

    “Go on”

    “Now they tell me that not only are they better than the mighty of this earth, whose spittle they must lick ( not from fear--by no means--but because God commands us to honor our superiors), but they are even better off, or at least they will be better off someday. But I’ve had all I can stand. The smell is too much for me. This shop where they manufacture ideals seems to me to stink of lies.”

    “But just a moment. You haven’t told me anything about the greatest feat of these black magicians, who precipitate the white milk of loving-kindness out of every kind of blackness. Haven’t you noticed their most consummate sleight of hand, their boldest, finest, most brilliant trick? Just watch! These vermin, full of vindictive hatred, what are they brewing out of their of poisons? Have you ever heard vengeance and hatred mentioned? Would you ever guess, if you only listened to their words, that these are men bursting with hatred?”

    “I see what you mean. I’ll open my ears again--and stop my nose. Now I can make out what they seem to have been saying all along ‘We, the good ones, are also the just ones.’ They call the thing they seek not retribution but the triumph of justice; the thing they hate is not their enemy, by no means--they hate injustice, ungodliness; the thing they hope for and believe in is not vengeance, the sweet exultation of vengeance (‘sweeter than honey’ as Homer said) but ‘the triumph of God’ who is just, over the godless’; what remains to them to love on this earth is not their brothers in hatred, but what they call their ‘brother in love’-- all who are good and just.”

    “And what do they call that which comforts them in all their suffering--their phantasmagoria of future bliss?”

    “Do I hear correctly? They call it Judgment Day, the coming of their kingdom, the ‘Kingdom of God.’ Meanwhile they live in ‘faith,’ in ‘love,’ in ‘hope.’”

    “Stop! I’ve heard enough.”

    From The Birth of Tragedy & the Genealogy of Morals translated my Francis Golffing..pages 180-182
    Later,
    -Lyfing

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