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Thread: Do You Own/Wear National Costumes?

  1. #31
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    I have some norwegian wool sweaters like this: (lusekofte)
    and a icelandic one:

    (islender)

    I really want to get a bunad, this is the male variant of the northern norwegian bunad:

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    This one..
    Its the traditional male costume from the are where I have my ancestory and my BOL.



    So do you own/wear national costumes? If you wear them, on what occasions?
    I wear it whenever full dress is called for like weddings, communions, national day, christmas etc.

    Did your parents give them to you, did you buy them or tailored them yourself?
    Bought it. They are all specially tailored and hand made, and they cost a small fortune. Every area has a different one so by following traditions and wearing the correct outfit people will see where your ancestry is from.

    Do folks in your area wear national costumes? If yes, when and where?
    Many people are wearing them especially on our national day, especially women. However during the last 10 years they have gained popularity also among men.

    What is the meaning of national costumes to you?

    A symbol of pride and national identity and a way to bring old craftsmanship into the future.

    This is the knife you wear to a national costume. Also hand crafted.



    I also have a couple of sets of His Majestys national costumes, but its been 10 kilo since I could fit into them. Thats what happens when you're no longer required to keep in shape..

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    About National/Folk Costumes?

    1.) Do you like national/folk costumes?

    2.) How national/folk costume looks like in your country/in your living area?

    3.) Do you own one?

    4.) If have one; in which situations you tend to wear it?

    Oh, I simply love Norwegians bunads . They are soooo much cuter & prettier (more details, more colors etc.) than anything here in Finland.
    Sadly I'm not Norwegian ... and I think I have no ''rights'' to buy or wear any of those. Never ever.

    Here are typical Finland's national/folk costumes. The 1. type has strong influence from Karelia/East etc. I don't feel any connection on that. The 2. type just looks boring.





    As many here knows....my father is Southern Swedish (my mother Finnish Swede):

    From my father's father's side (= my grandfather) .... the folk costumes would look like as these (area where the family line comes from):




    From my father's mother's side (= my grandmother) ... the folk costumes would look like as these (area where the family lines comes from):



    I also like & love those Swedish folk costumes more than anything in Finland. They reminds Norwegians' bunads bit more too. As I have dual nationality (also citizen of Sweden) ... do you think that I ''could'' wear one of those (if I would like to)? Or would it be wrong, odd or weird? I think my Swedish granny would like that ... at least. LOL.

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    I like the Bayern and northern Austrian (Tyrol) national dress. There are so many variations of this dress though.

    Lederhosen for men and Dirndls for the Damen are pretty standard fare.
    American by birth, made of parts from Emmingen, Baden-Württemberg.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Herr Rentz View Post
    I like the Bayern and northern Austrian (Tyrol) national dress. There are so many variations of this dress though.

    Lederhosen for men and Dirndls for the Damen are pretty standard fare.
    I adore Norwegians bunads ... something like these:




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    Quote Originally Posted by Finnish Swede View Post
    Here are typical Finland's national/folk costumes. The 1. type has strong influence from Karelia/East etc. I don't feel any connection on that. The 2. type just looks boring.
    Regardless, I am slightly in love with this painting.


    I think it looks nice. A bit simplistic, perhaps, but it seems more practical for more casual use than the Norwegian dresses.

    Quote Originally Posted by Finnish Swede View Post
    I also like & love those Swedish folk costumes more than anything in Finland. They reminds Norwegians' bunads bit more too. As I have dual nationality (also citizen of Sweden) ... do you think that I ''could'' wear one of those (if I would like to)? Or would it be wrong, odd or weird? I think my Swedish granny would like that ... at least. LOL.
    I don't see anything wrong with that. In Norway, at least, it is very common for people to dress up in the folk costumes from the region of one of their parents or grandparents, even if they've lived all their lives a completely different place. I know of some Swedes who do that, as well, even though the tradition for National costumes doesn't seem to be as widespread.

    I've been thinking of getting myself a Norwegian folk costume, as well. Unfortunately for me, this what my home region's bunad looks like.



    Unlike the gorgeous female Norwegian bunads, most male bunads look a bit goofy, in my opinion. This one, from a region on the West-Coast looks much better, though.



    I'd have to check my ancestral line more closely, in search for some historical legitimization for acquiring one.

    Most of the bunads are pretty expensive, though, and range between 2,000 to 4,000 euros...
    A nation is an organic thing, historically defined.
    A wave of passionate energy which unites past, present and future generations

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    Had to add this amazing bunad from Aust-Agder in Southern Norway...



    Makes me look forward to the Norwegian National Day, when a large part of the population get dressed in this way and gather in the streets.
    A nation is an organic thing, historically defined.
    A wave of passionate energy which unites past, present and future generations

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    I like them. I wish they were worn more often.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Žoreišar View Post
    Regardless, I am slightly in love with this painting.



    I think it looks nice. A bit simplistic, perhaps, but it seems more practical for more casual use than the Norwegian dresses.
    That is very typical. Sorry I don't know that painting. If you tell me the link, I might be able to check which region's folk costume is that. For your info: knife is not a joke. Some Finland's (woman) folk suits have knifes:





    Quote Originally Posted by Žoreišar View Post

    I don't see anything wrong with that. In Norway, at least, it is very common for people to dress up in the folk costumes from the region of one of their parents or grandparents, even if they've lived all their lives a completely different place. I know of some Swedes who do that, as well, even though the tradition for National costumes doesn't seem to be as widespread.
    Same in here (Finland). Of course one can buy whatever costume (region's folk costume) he/she likes, but the idea is to wear a folk costume of region where your ancestors came from/lived. Someway respect them,your roots and that region. So it basically shows where you come from.

    Yes, I think Swedish wear folk/national costumes much less than Norwegians do (and even less than Finns do). And they have a created one common one to all of them

    Jimmie Åkelsson (SD) with his girlfriend:

    Again, I would feel corny/wrong to wear that one. I don't keep myself ''Swedish'' enough .... plus some Sweden's minorities/immigrants wears that already ... even with hijab


    But a regional one? From where my father's family comes from? Who knows. I'll need to talk with my granny. I'm sure she would love that .

    Quote Originally Posted by Žoreišar View Post
    Most of the bunads are pretty expensive, though, and range between 2,000 to 4,000 euros...
    Oh, Finland's folk costumes are not cheap either (even if they are more simply). Lots of hand works. I don't expect Sweden's would be anything else either.

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    Where I live, traditional costumes are typically worn on festive occasions, in traditional restaurants and/or by musicians, folk dancers and entertainers.

    Dancers in traditional dress perform during the opening of the traditional Kathreintanz:



    Since it is a touristy area, there is a fashion outlet for costumes or immitations thereof. They vary from simple off-the-shelf styles to exquisitely crafted, very expensive models. The German word for traditional costumes is Tracht (from tragen = to carry/wear). Women will typically wear a Dirndl dress, and men Lederhosen (leather pants), though in the modern era one may also see women in Lederhosen, especially among the youth.

    A couple of contemporary folk costumes based on the traditional Dirndl:





    Lederhosen can be of various lengths and styles.







    A simple modern youth-style dress:



    Dresses that are loosely based on the dirndl are known as Landhausmode ("country-inspired fashion"). There is also a haute couture direction based on traditional dress, both rural and aristocratic. The Austrian upper classes adopted the Dirndl as high fashion in the 1870s, making it a highly fashionable and popular must-have item in the nation soon after. The popularity of lederhosen had initially dropped sharply in the 19th century, as they began to be considered an uncultured peasants' clothing that was not fitting for modern city-dwellers. However, in the 1880s a resurgence set in, and several clubs were founded in large cities devoted to preserving traditional rural clothing styles.

    National costumes and the Landhausmode were abandoned for a while after World War II. The wearing of the corresponding garments became popular again starting with the 70s, and has grown steadily since the 90s. Lederhosen and Dirndls are considered a symbol of regional pride and often associated with Austro-Bavarian culture. Dirndls are seen as expressions of feminity and elegance, in which any woman can look simply beautiful. Lederhosen are associated with virility and brawn. Some scouts occasionally wear Lederhosen. Other than that, they are far more common in the rural area. Some men wear them when hiking, gardening, working outdoors, or attending folk festivals or beer gardens. In some areas people will wear some forms of traditional dress to church or events like weddings. Weddings in traditional costume have become very popular, both in villages and some cities. A wedding dress based on the Dirndl:



    But by far the most popular time and place to wear traditional dress is the Oktoberfest. Both locals and tourists alike will take out their Dirndls and Lederhosen and show them off. Folk costumes can also convey certain messages, e.g. the way a woman's apron bow is tied shows her marital status (left = single, right = married/in a relationship, middle front = virgin, back = widow or waitress).

    In post-war Austria, wearing traditional costume has often been seen as a political statement; it can get one associated with conservative or right-wing ideologies. For this reason, some people will frown at it as something politically incorrect. However, the opinion of fashion designers like Vivienne Westwood has lead to a change in attitude towards the Tracht. She was quoted saying "I do not understand you Austrians. If every woman wore a dirndl, there would not be any more ugliness". Eversince, young people started to reclaim their heritage and shops that sell traditional costumes of items have been reporting big profits. Some people will wear checkered or embroidered shirts, wollen cardigans, boleros, traditional jackets with short green collars or loden coats with horn buttons as part of their everyday/casual outfit. A few ways to incorporate traditional style clothing in modern dress style:



    Some fashion houses like Sissi Vienna or Mothwurf Austrian Couture offer a mix of imperial fashion and modern traditional costume.











    I'll add some historical and regional costumes later.

    Re: the "hijab", I'm not sure about the modern version in Finland, however some Germanic folk costumes also included headscarves. Until about the 18th century, the wearing of a headcovering for the hair was regarded as customary for women in Germanic/European countries. A lot of the regional costumes have some type of headscarf, hat or covering. It didn't really have to do with Islam though, it was rather a matter of Christian tradition combined with pragmatism. It was quite common on formal occasions, especially in church. The custom is still present today among Anabaptists, such as the Amish and Mennonites, who cover their hair at most times. Although some denominations were more strict about it, Christians were generally much more relaxed and permissive about it than Muslims. Not all women wore the veil, especially outside of public worship. Hats, scarfs, hair nets, bonnets or kerchiefs were also acceptable. Aside from modesty, wearing a head covering had practical reasons for peasants and workers especially (protection from sunrays and bad weather, protection against industrial contamination, for example in dusty and oily environments). Since women traditionally wore their hair long, wearing a covering also ensured that the hair would not interfere with their work and get caught-up in machinery. Hygiene also required wearing some type of head cover, especially in kitchens and hospitals.

    An example from Austria and Southern Germany was the Goldhaube, a variety of cauls and hoods with goldwork embroidery.





    A painting and a modern rendition:




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