View Poll Results: What do you think about it?

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  • It's something mankind caused

    31 36.47%
  • It's a natural phenomenon

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  • We should try to prevent it

    26 30.59%
  • We should just accept it and try to react on changes

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Thread: Do You Believe in Global Warming?

  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Griffon View Post
    This is a good diagram in flashvideo format depicts the climate change after the dinosaurs... click each thumbnail for detailed information about the climate during each geological era. The vegetation button is especially good to view the geological impact of the ever-changing climate.

    http://www.abc.net.au/beasts/changing/default.htm
    "Modern humans survived the ice ages and push some animal species to extinction."

    I feel bad for the animals. Someone call PETA.

  2. #32
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    I don't know if I can say there's a global warming specifically, but I notice there's a quite fast change in climate.
    Climate does change naturally, but in a slow way through years, with particular exceptions like those caused by volcanoes, which are natural processes indeed. However, the changes I feel are (at least to me) notorious and in few years relatively speaking. My observations:
    In the region where I was born, the climate was subtropical, characterised by a marked difference between the four seasons, hot summers with a relatively high rainy days frequence (at least one rainy day in the week, or two weeks if the year was dry), high ambient moisture (in general more than 70%, reaching 100% often in winter) and mild winters (temperatures were lower than 0ºC only in very few days, always due to southern winds). That's the climate my mother always told me about and the one I knew in my childhood.
    Since some years ago I feel there's a transition: rains are becomming fewer and fewer each summer while the thermal sensation reaches easily more than 40ºC with minimums of 30ºC. The difference between autumm and winter and between spring and summer are negligible now, extreme temperatures days are each time more often and they alternate too quick, so quick that the frequence of people with colds or flu augments the weeks in which there are cold days followed by a high augment in temperature or viceversa (let's say that one day there's a minimum of 4ºC and the next is 20ºC, that's happening specially in winter). I'm afraid my region is changing into a two-seasons climate.
    My region is highly irrigated by rivers, being my city upon the second biggest river in S America, so there shouldn't be that alternance. Part of the problem might be air pollution, but my zone isn't that industrialized, it's mainly agricultural. The actual problem is deforestation (partly because soy is claiming fields, and partly because the wood is then exported); as there are no trees there are no agents to keep nutrients in the soil nor to regulate the climate.

    Another example:
    I'm studying at university so I had to move to another province. There, a famous town called Alta Gracia was many years ago a paradise for people with tuberculosis because the air was dry and clean. Nowadays there are so many dams in the region that the climate became rainy and wet, which caused a reduction in the number of tourists going to Alta Gracia.

    If it's real or a sensation, I really can't afirm any, I just can tell you what I feel.

  3. #33
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    A couple recent articles on the subject:

    http://www.nationalpost.com/opinion/...html?id=332289

    Snow cover over North America and much of Siberia, Mongolia and China is greater than at any time since 1966.

    The U.S. National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) reported that many American cities and towns suffered record cold temperatures in January and early February. According to the NCDC, the average temperature in January "was -0.3 F cooler than the 1901-2000 (20th century) average."

    China is surviving its most brutal winter in a century. Temperatures in the normally balmy south were so low for so long that some middle-sized cities went days and even weeks without electricity because once power lines had toppled it was too cold or too icy to repair them.

    There have been so many snow and ice storms in Ontario and Quebec in the past two months that the real estate market has felt the pinch as home buyers have stayed home rather than venturing out looking for new houses.

    In just the first two weeks of February, Toronto received 70 cm of snow, smashing the record of 66.6 cm for the entire month set back in the pre-SUV, pre-Kyoto, pre-carbon footprint days of 1950.

    And remember the Arctic Sea ice? The ice we were told so hysterically last fall had melted to its "lowest levels on record? Never mind that those records only date back as far as 1972 and that there is anthropological and geological evidence of much greater melts in the past.

    The ice is back.

    Gilles Langis, a senior forecaster with the Canadian Ice Service in Ottawa, says the Arctic winter has been so severe the ice has not only recovered, it is actually 10 to 20 cm thicker in many places than at this time last year.

    OK, so one winter does not a climate make. It would be premature to claim an Ice Age is looming just because we have had one of our most brutal winters in decades.

    But if environmentalists and environment reporters can run around shrieking about the manmade destruction of the natural order every time a robin shows up on Georgian Bay two weeks early, then it is at least fair game to use this winter's weather stories to wonder whether the alarmist are being a tad premature.

    And it's not just anecdotal evidence that is piling up against the climate-change dogma.

    According to Robert Toggweiler of the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory at Princeton University and Joellen Russell, assistant professor of biogeochemical dynamics at the University of Arizona -- two prominent climate modellers -- the computer models that show polar ice-melt cooling the oceans, stopping the circulation of warm equatorial water to northern latitudes and triggering another Ice Age (a la the movie The Day After Tomorrow) are all wrong.

    "We missed what was right in front of our eyes," says Prof. Russell. It's not ice melt but rather wind circulation that drives ocean currents northward from the tropics. Climate models until now have not properly accounted for the wind's effects on ocean circulation, so researchers have compensated by over-emphasizing the role of manmade warming on polar ice melt.

    But when Profs. Toggweiler and Russell rejigged their model to include the 40-year cycle of winds away from the equator (then back towards it again), the role of ocean currents bringing warm southern waters to the north was obvious in the current Arctic warming.

    Last month, Oleg Sorokhtin, a fellow of the Russian Academy of Natural Sciences, shrugged off manmade climate change as "a drop in the bucket." Showing that solar activity has entered an inactive phase, Prof. Sorokhtin advised people to "stock up on fur coats."

    He is not alone. Kenneth Tapping of our own National Research Council, who oversees a giant radio telescope focused on the sun, is convinced we are in for a long period of severely cold weather if sunspot activity does not pick up soon.

    The last time the sun was this inactive, Earth suffered the Little Ice Age that lasted about five centuries and ended in 1850. Crops failed through killer frosts and drought. Famine, plague and war were widespread. Harbours froze, so did rivers, and trade ceased.




    http://www.dailytech.com/Temperature...ticle10866.htm

    Twelve-month long drop in world temperatures wipes out a century of warming

    Over the past year, anecdotal evidence for a cooling planet has exploded. China has its coldest winter in 100 years. Baghdad sees its first snow in all recorded history. North America has the most snowcover in 50 years, with places like Wisconsin the highest since record-keeping began. Record levels of Antarctic sea ice, record cold in Minnesota, Texas, Florida, Mexico, Australia, Iran, Greece, South Africa, Greenland, Argentina, Chile -- the list goes on and on.

    No more than anecdotal evidence, to be sure. But now, that evidence has been supplanted by hard scientific fact. All four major global temperature tracking outlets (Hadley, NASA's GISS, UAH, RSS) have released updated data. All show that over the past year, global temperatures have dropped precipitously.

    A compiled list of all the sources can be seen here. The total amount of cooling ranges from 0.65C up to 0.75C -- a value large enough to wipe out nearly all the warming recorded over the past 100 years. All in one year's time. For all four sources, it's the single fastest temperature change ever recorded, either up or down.

    Scientists quoted in a past DailyTech article link the cooling to reduced solar activity which they claim is a much larger driver of climate change than man-made greenhouse gases. The dramatic cooling seen in just 12 months time seems to bear that out. While the data doesn't itself disprove that carbon dioxide is acting to warm the planet, it does demonstrate clearly that more powerful factors are now cooling it.

    Let's hope those factors stop fast. Cold is more damaging than heat. The mean temperature of the planet is about 54 degrees. Humans -- and most of the crops and animals we depend on -- prefer a temperature closer to 70.
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  4. #34
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    How soon can Al Gore get some global warming to me? My summer house has 8 feet of snow and I am worried it will break down my deck. It has already damaged my metal roof in two places.

  5. #35
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    I believe it's related to variations in the suns output, therefore not caused by man.

  6. #36
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    Is Global Warming Real ?

    Please listen to me. I am a geologist. I have studied geologic history, paleoclimatology, glaciology, glacial geology, and Pleistocene geology. I KNOW WHAT I AM TALKING ABOUT.

    In the past 1.8 million years, there have been at least four ice ages and three interglacial ages. The interglacial ages have varied between at least 100,000 and ~300,000 years in duration. In each, the temperature rose gradually for more than half of the interglacial age and fell more rapidly thereafter.

    The most recent ice age (NOT the last as some have called it) began its decline 11,000 years ago. Most of the glacial ice was gone by 6000 years ago. The Laurentide Ice sheet in North America contained, at its maximum development, about 3 million CUBIC MILES of ice. In about 5000 years, all of this ice was melted.

    THAT required global warming on a scale which staggers the imagination. It represented the beginning of an interglacial age which, if the present is the key to the past, as most geologists assume, has AT LEAST 89,000 years to run. It should reach its peak temperatures in around 50,000 years if it is like those which have preceded it.

    The causes of glaciation and deglaciation are controversial and ill-understood. However, considering that this sequence of ice age and interglacial age has been going on for about 1,800,000 years, it is safe to assume that human activity has played no significant part in it.

    We didn't start deglaciation and we can't stop it ! If we never burn a single atom of carbon again, the interglacial age will continue its relentless course. There have been major episodes (and many minor ones) of global warming of vastly greater magnitude than anything we have ever observed in human history three times in the past 1.8 million years. We do not know their cause(s).

    There are many factors which can and doubtless do contribute to global warming. Some are astronomical factors over which we cannot hope to have any control. These may well be the major causes. "Greenhouse gases" are another. Their relative importance is unknown. Variations in the solar magnetic field are yet another, over which we cannot conceivably have any control, also of unknown importance.

    The formation of cloud droplets requires nuclei on which the water vapour condenses. They are provided by ionisation of nitrogen and oxygen atoms in the atmosphere by cosmic ray particles. The more cosmic ray particles enter the atmosphere, the more cloud cover there is and the more solar radiation is reflected back into space and does not reach the Earth's surface.

    The solar magnetic field tends to drive cosmic ray particles out of the inner Solar System. Over the past decade, there has been a substantial increase in the strength of the solar magnetic field and a concomitant decrease in the cosmic ray flux into the Earth's atmosphere. This can be expected to decrease the albedo [reflectivity] of the atmosphere, permitting more solar radiation to reach the surface, contributing to global warming.

    The present episode of rapid global warming is not the first of its kind. 8,000-4,500 years ago there was a paleoclimatic event known as the Thermal Maximum, or, to Scandinavian paleoclimatologists, as the "Climatic Optimum" ,during which Norway had a climate like that of Capri today. The cause of this event is unknown. Surely, at that time, mankind had nothing to do with it.

    There is no better reason to assume that mankind has caused the present episode of global warming.

    It is past time that we stopped playing the "blame game" and pointing accusing fingers at each other and started trying to DO something about the effects of unavoidable global warming. Some of the dire effects predicted WILL occur. If we are unable to ADAPT to these changes, we will join the cave bear, the sabre-tooth cat, the mastodon, and the wooly mammoth in extinction!

  7. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gorm
    It represented the beginning of an interglacial age which, if the present is the key to the past, as most geologists assume, has at least 87,000 years to run. It should reach its peak temperatures in around 50,000 years if it is like those which have preceded it.
    As a reader of popular media I thought climatologists had been stating all along that inter-glacial periods last about 10-12 thousand years, and that as it has been about 10 thousand years since the end of the last Ice-age, then (increased human activity aside) the Northern Hemisphere was due to return to an Ice covered period, more or less immediately.
    I'm sure I've never heard mention in the popular press of a possible 87,000 year inter-glacial period.

  8. #38
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    Twelve-month long drop in world temperatures wipes out a century of warming

    Over the past year, anecdotal evidence for a cooling planet has exploded. China has its coldest winter in 100 years. Baghdad sees its first snow in all recorded history. North America has the most snowcover in 50 years, with places like Wisconsin the highest since record-keeping began. Record levels of Antarctic sea ice, record cold in Minnesota, Texas, Florida, Mexico, Australia, Iran, Greece, South Africa, Greenland, Argentina, Chile -- the list goes on and on.

    No more than anecdotal evidence, to be sure. But now, that evidence has been supplanted by hard scientific fact. All four major global temperature tracking outlets (Hadley, NASA's GISS, UAH, RSS) have released updated data. All show that over the past year, global temperatures have dropped precipitously.

    A compiled list of all the sources can be seen here. The total amount of cooling ranges from 0.65C up to 0.75C -- a value large enough to wipe out most of the warming recorded over the past 100 years. All in one year's time. For all four sources, it's the single fastest temperature change ever recorded, either up or down.

    Scientists quoted in a past DailyTech article link the cooling to reduced solar activity which they claim is a much larger driver of climate change than man-made greenhouse gases. The dramatic cooling seen in just 12 months time seems to bear that out. While the data doesn't itself disprove that carbon dioxide is acting to warm the planet, it does demonstrate clearly that more powerful factors are now cooling it.

    Let's hope those factors stop fast. Cold is more damaging than heat. The mean temperature of the planet is about 54 degrees. Humans -- and most of the crops and animals we depend on -- prefer a temperature closer to 70.

    Historically, the warm periods such as the Medieval Climate Optimum were beneficial for civilization. Corresponding cooling events such as the Little Ice Age, though, were uniformly bad news.

    Update 2/27: The graph for HadCRUT (above), as well as the linked graphs for RSS and UAH are generated month-to-month; the temperature declines span a full 12 months of data. The linked GISS graph was graphed for the months of January only, due to a limitation in the plotting program. Anthony Watts, who kindly provided the graphics, otherwise has no connection with the column. The views and comments are those of the author only.
    Source.

    Ho hum...

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    Reply to The Horned God

    The shortest of the past major Interglacial Ages have been AT LEAST 100,000 years long. I merely subtracted the 13,000 years since the beginning of the retreat of the Wisconsinan (or Wurm) ice sheets from 100,000 years, thus arriving at 87,000 years. However, more recent estimates indicate that the Wisconsinan (Wurm) glaciation ended only 11,000 years ago, so 89,000 years would be a better figure. This estimated duration is probably too short.

    There have been 4 Ice Ages and 3 Interglacial Ages in the past 1,800,000 years. Climatically, there must be either an Ice Age or an Interglacial Age going on at any time in the past 1,800,000 years of Pleistocene time. If the Ice Ages and Interglacial Ages were (which they were NOT) all of equal duration, each would have been ~260,000 years long. NONE could be as short as 10-12,000 years.

    A glacial advance or retreat would take that long, but after the advance there would many 10's of thousands of years of glaciation. After a major retreat, marking the beginning of an Interglacial age, there would be many tens of thousands of years of global warming.

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    I haven't read the whole thread, so excuse me if I copy someone or anything.

    As for the question itself:

    I do not believe in Global Warming. I studied agriculture, and I know nature by what it is:
    Ever changing.

    Global warming is nothing but the climate changing, an syklus. The seasons change, so does the world. Homo Sapiens just happen to speed it up.

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