View Poll Results: Which Germanic country/region has stayed most true to its heritage?

Voters
174. You may not vote on this poll
  • Denmark

    25 14.37%
  • The German lands (Germany, Austria, Switzerland, Liechtenstein, Luxembourg etc.)

    30 17.24%
  • England

    3 1.72%
  • Iceland

    98 56.32%
  • The Netherlands/Flanders

    10 5.75%
  • Norway

    45 25.86%
  • Sweden

    20 11.49%
  • Australia/NZ

    6 3.45%
  • Canada

    2 1.15%
  • South Africa

    8 4.60%
  • The USA

    6 3.45%
  • The Germanic Enclaves

    19 10.92%
  • Other

    13 7.47%
Multiple Choice Poll.
Page 4 of 11 FirstFirst 123456789 ... LastLast
Results 31 to 40 of 104

Thread: Which Germanic Nation Excels Presently/Has Stayed Truest to Its Heritage?

  1. #31
    Funding Member Leofric's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Last Online
    3 Weeks Ago @ 02:15 PM
    Ethnicity
    English
    Subrace
    Nordid
    Country
    United States United States
    State
    California California
    Location
    Pacific Northwest
    Gender
    Age
    39
    Zodiac Sign
    Aquarius
    Family
    Married
    Occupation
    Telecommunications
    Politics
    Libertarian/Neo-Imperialist
    Religion
    Heathen
    Posts
    1,219
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    10
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    5
    Thanked in
    5 Posts

    Re: AW: Re: Which Germanic nation excels presently?

    Quote Originally Posted by Vhailor View Post
    I´ve to disagree here. The most spoken language in Europe is, by far, German. Germany isn´t going to lose this advantage. Today, around 91 mio. Europeans speak German as their native language (Germany, Austria, big parts of Switzerland and some other small german-speaking territories), followed by some more million people who speak German as a foreign language.
    English is not in the strongest position anymore. The ethnical composition of Britain is changing, and so does the language.

    I wouldn´t be amazed if the EU would set German as a main language in the future. The role and the prestige of the German language in the world is rising, not declining. Chinese for example are learning German to an very high extent, as Asia generally.
    Sure, English is the major worldwide language right now, but I´m unsure about the future of this premisse.
    It would be wonderful if what you were saying were true. But it's not. English is most definitely still in the strongest position and its strength is growing quicker than German's, and I think that, because of that the English have the greatest long-term advantage among the Germanic nations.

    First, let's consider Europe alone. It is true that 18% of the inhabitants of the EU speak German as a mother tongue — more than any other language. English is only 13%.

    But only 14% speak German as a second language, compared with 38% for English.

    That means that English is spoken by 51% of the inhabitants of the EU compared to 32% for German. That's significant.

    Furthermore, these figures are up from 47% for English and 30% for German in 2004. That's a four-point increase for English and a two-point increase for German. In other words, not only has English use increased more than German use in absolute terms, but also as a percentage of speakers in 2004 — English is up 9% of its 2004 usage while German is up only 7%. That's also significant.

    Consider this, too: only 56% of EU inhabitants speak a foreign language. That means that of those who are bilingual, 68% speak English as a second language. Only 25% of bilinguals speak German as a second language. That's also significant.

    Furthermore, when asked which two foreign languages parents though their children should learn, 77% of EU inhabitants listed English, which was the only language to gain a majority of respondents. 33% said French and only 28% said German. And only in Ireland, the UK, and Luxembourg did a language other than English gain the most responses in the survey — in each of those, parents thought French would make a better foreign language than English. It's not hard to explain why the Irish and the British would find English an unsuitable foreign language for their kids, of course. Who can explain Luxembourg? In no country did more respondents choose German than any other language and only in 7 countries (compared to 23 for English — all the non-English-speaking states) did German gain the favor of a majority of respondents.

    In addition, English is one of the three most commonly spoken second languages in every member state of the EU but one, Slovakia. That's 24 states. In contrast, German is one of the top three foreign languages in 18. And only in 3 of those 18 does it rank higher than English as a foreign language: Slovakia, the Czech Republic, and Luxembourg.

    The importance of German as a second language in Europe is miniscule compared to the importance of English as a second language. It is primarily important as a second language only in Eastern Europe (as opposed to English, which is important everywhere). Though it is a major first-language and its prestige as a second language is growing, it is still far outpaced by English in every regard.

    And that's just in the EU.

    On a global scale, English is spoken by 309 million people as a native language and an additional 199 million as a second language. German, on the other hand, is spoken by 95 million natively and 28 million as a second language. Notice that there are more people who speak English as a second language than all the people who speak German, either as a first or a second language. This gives England easier access to world markets than Germany can enjoy without resorting to use of English, which inevitably damages German.

    And although Mandarin is spoken by more people than English is, by far, it is not spoken so widely as English is.

    You brought up the example of Latin. Good example. Latin destroyed the indigenous languages of half of Europe as the Romans conquered Italia, Hispania, and Gallia, not to mention the colonization of Dacia. Except for far pockets of Brittany, you can't find the indigenous languages of that whole region.

    The Romans also destroyed the indigenous languages of North Africa, but the Romance of that region was subsequently destroyed by the Arabs, another big conquering nation.

    The speakers of languages derived from Latin are more numerous than those who speak English: 648 million native speakers, 125 million second-language speakers; total 773 million speakers. And those are minimum figures. I've only included French, Italian, Portuguese, Romanian, and Spanish.

    Latin is a major player in the world today. And the Romans just took over half of Europe.

    The English have taken over more territory than any other nation that's ever walked the face of the earth. They have imposed their language on hundreds of millions of people — far more than the Romans ever did. One in twelve people on the planet speaks English — far more than ever spoke Latin during the time of Rome's might. And if Latin, from such a small beginning, was able to become such an important figure in global languages that English still has not surpassed it, imagine what English will do as it continues to enjoy the combined prestige of the US, the UK, Canada, and Australia. Even if all the English states fold economically within the next couple of decades, the linguistic effect of all that colonization will be devastating to the world's languages, including the other Germanic languages.

    It is my contention that the English, because of having made significantly stronger colonial investments than any other Germanic nation, continue and will continue to reap benefits from those investments for at least another hundred years — benefits that will put them far ahead of every other Germanic nation through the future in terms of cultural strength and preservation.



    Sources for data in this post:
    http://europa.eu:80/languages/en/chapter/20
    http://www.ethnologue.com/web.asp

  2. #32
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Last Online
    Sunday, February 25th, 2007 @ 10:29 AM
    Subrace
    nordiſch-weſtiſch
    Location
    Deutſchland
    Gender
    Family
    Single
    Politics
    Volk und Raſſe
    Posts
    1,626
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    5
    Thanked in
    5 Posts

    Re: Which Germanic nation excels presently?

    Quote Originally Posted by Leofric View Post
    I know you have asked us to consider economic stability and so forth, but considering the "long-term prospects" of the various Germanic nation states "in a multi-lingual state in Europe," I must say that at the moment, it looks like the English have the greatest advantage over the long term in a multilingual European state, since no other language enjoys the same prestige on a global scale as does the language of the English.
    Regarding that discussion on the English language ... I'm not sure if I get it right, since he has refrained from clarifying or correcting something, but looking at the thread opener's formulation: "Which Germanic nation state or ethnic region in a multi-lingual state in Europe ..."--Doesn't he rather speak here of ethnic Germanic regions within the current multi-lingual states in Europe (e. g. Flanders in Belgium) than of a future pan-European multi-lingual greater state?
    Man ſei Held oder Heiliger. In der Mitte liegt nicht die Weisheit, ſondern die Alltäglichkeit.

    SPENGLER

  3. #33
    Senior Member Dropkick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Last Online
    Friday, August 24th, 2012 @ 11:48 AM
    Ethnicity
    Irish
    Country
    Other Other
    Location
    Waterford
    Gender
    Family
    In a steady relationship
    Posts
    413
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    0
    Thanked in
    0 Posts

    Re: Which Germanic nation excels presently?

    In Ireland French and German are traditionally thought in schools. I think Italian and Spanish has now come into some schools.

  4. #34
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Last Online
    Tuesday, March 13th, 2018 @ 09:14 AM
    Status
    Prolonged Absence
    Ethnicity
    Dutch
    Gender
    Posts
    2,696
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    0
    Thanked in
    0 Posts

    Re: Which Germanic nation excels presently?

    Quote Originally Posted by Leofric
    And only in Ireland, the UK, and Luxembourg did a language other than English gain the most responses in the survey — in each of those, parents thought French would make a better foreign language than English. It's not hard to explain why the Irish and the British would find English an unsuitable foreign language for their kids, of course. Who can explain Luxembourg?
    Luxembourg borders on France and Germany, and both French and German are official languages there. The popular dialect is of Germanic origin and though it has grown fairly distinct from German, I suppose many Luxembourgers would prefer French as a second language because it is also an official language there and not as easy to make sense of when your native tongue is Germanic.

  5. #35
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Last Online
    Sunday, February 25th, 2007 @ 10:29 AM
    Subrace
    nordiſch-weſtiſch
    Location
    Deutſchland
    Gender
    Family
    Single
    Politics
    Volk und Raſſe
    Posts
    1,626
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    5
    Thanked in
    5 Posts

    Re: Which Germanic nation excels presently?

    Quote Originally Posted by Siegfried View Post
    Luxembourg borders on France and Germany, and both French and German are official languages there. The popular dialect is of Germanic origin and though it has grown fairly distinct from German, I suppose many Luxembourgers would prefer French as a second language because it is also an official language there and not as easy to make sense of when your native tongue is Germanic.
    It needs anyway some deciphering when statistics say this or that about the favoured "second language" of the Luxemburgers. The "national language" of the country is "Luxemburgish", and some web lexicons inform that German and French are learned as preferred "foreign languages". The percentage of standard German in the newspapers there is somewhat about 95%, also most books are printed in standard German, the education in school runs in standard German (in higher classes than French comes as additional language of instruction), the Luxemburgers preferentially watch German TV and so one. "Luxemburgish", on the other side, is hardly used in written form, as a "standard language". Actually Luxemburg still is what it has always been historically and culturally: a part of the German speech area. That the local German dialect of the region was made the "national language" was for political reasons in the 1980s, to point out that the country had an own identity and character and so on, but that didn't change the fundamental facts of the country's actual language situation. That the broad mass of the population shows excellent "competence" in the "foreign language" German isn't really surprising ...
    Man ſei Held oder Heiliger. In der Mitte liegt nicht die Weisheit, ſondern die Alltäglichkeit.

    SPENGLER

  6. #36
    Senior Member SineNomine's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Last Online
    Sunday, November 9th, 2008 @ 05:25 AM
    Ethnicity
    Germanic
    Subrace
    Mediterranid
    Country
    England England
    Location
    Nord du pays
    Gender
    Age
    31
    Family
    Single
    Occupation
    Student
    Politics
    Libertarian
    Religion
    MYOB
    Posts
    2,135
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    0
    Thanked in
    0 Posts

    Re: Which Germanic nation excels presently?

    England, Germany and Iceland. Only the third excels when it comes to racial purity though. The former two excel because of their all-powerful economies. England and Iceland are both favourites of mine because of their semi-laissez-faire policies. They should go further.

    If I were to go a step further and include the US, it would be the obvious victor... depends on how much one can consider it part of the Anglosphere though (Australia is more definitely a part of it). Too many nonwhite Hispanics and blacks for that, as well as a considerable amount of individuals of French, Italian and Irish descent.

    Hopefully one day one can add a secessionary Boerevolkstaat to the list of germanic nations.

  7. #37
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Last Online
    Sunday, November 12th, 2017 @ 06:54 PM
    Ethnicity
    German
    Country
    Germany Germany
    State
    Silesia Silesia
    Gender
    Posts
    859
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    3
    Thanked in
    3 Posts

    Re: AW: Re: Which Germanic nation excels presently?

    Quote Originally Posted by Leofric View Post
    This gives England easier access to world markets than Germany can enjoy without resorting to use of English, which inevitably damages German.
    Time and again I am amazed and astonished, how... ... ...
    The speakers of languages derived from Latin are more numerous than those who speak English: 648 million native speakers, 125 million second-language speakers; total 773 million speakers. And those are minimum figures. I've only included French, Italian, Portuguese, Romanian, and Spanish.
    There's no need to count them together. According to my calculation, the number of native Spanish speakers worldwide alone is bigger than than of all native English speakers. Spanish topped English in or around 2000. And Spanish is growing - as you know best -, English not.
    The English have taken over more territory than any other nation that's ever walked the face of the earth.
    No. The largest Empire the world has ever seen was that of the Mongols.
    imagine what English will do as it continues to enjoy the combined prestige of the US, the UK, Canada, and Australia.
    It depends on how long these lands will enjoy that prestige. There is only one or the other war to lose and any prestige will fade away at an unimaginable speed.
    Even if all the English states fold economically within the next couple of decades, the linguistic effect of all that colonization will be devastating to the world's languages, including the other Germanic languages.
    ... ... ... such a staunch racial preservationist quickly turns into a fervent champ of linguistic domination.
    It is my contention that the English, because of having made significantly stronger colonial investments than any other Germanic nation, continue and will continue to reap benefits from those investments for at least another hundred years — benefits that will put them far ahead of every other Germanic nation through the future in terms of cultural strength and preservation.
    I wonder whether all those Ramirez, Gonzales, Mendoza, Castillo etc. etc. pp. with their brownish skin, quabbling some sort of "Americanish" will be so much interested in preserving Germanic traditions and values.

  8. #38
    Funding Member Leofric's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Last Online
    3 Weeks Ago @ 02:15 PM
    Ethnicity
    English
    Subrace
    Nordid
    Country
    United States United States
    State
    California California
    Location
    Pacific Northwest
    Gender
    Age
    39
    Zodiac Sign
    Aquarius
    Family
    Married
    Occupation
    Telecommunications
    Politics
    Libertarian/Neo-Imperialist
    Religion
    Heathen
    Posts
    1,219
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    10
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    5
    Thanked in
    5 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Spjabork View Post
    Time and again I am amazed and astonished, how... ... ...
    Hmm. Feel free, in the future, to read and understand my posts before responding to them. It makes for better conversation.




    Quote Originally Posted by Spjabork
    There's no need to count them together. According to my calculation, the number of native Spanish speakers worldwide alone is bigger than than of all native English speakers. Spanish topped English in or around 2000. And Spanish is growing - as you know best -, English not.
    English is actually growing quite rapidly as a second language — far more than Spanish or any of the other Romance langauges. And it's been English as a second langauge that I've been basing my points on over and over. As I have already said in this thread, World English will eventually dominate all the natural languages of the Germanic family — including real English.



    Quote Originally Posted by Spjabork
    No. The largest Empire the world has ever seen was that of the Mongols.
    From tip to tip?



    Quote Originally Posted by Spjabork
    It depends on how long these lands will enjoy that prestige. There is only one or the other war to lose and any prestige will fade away at an unimaginable speed.
    I'm using the term prestige in its sociolinguistic sense. Perhaps you're unfamiliar with the vocabulary. One lost war is generally horribly insufficient to weaken a language's prestige to the extent you suggest, so I assume that you have not understood the specialized use of the term.



    Quote Originally Posted by Spjabork
    ... ... ... such a staunch racial preservationist quickly turns into a fervent champ of linguistic domination.
    Now this is where you really seem to sound like you tuned out for a while as you attempted to understand my post.

    It seems that you're suggesting I'm actually advocating linguistic domination. Nothing could be further from the truth. If you'd cared to pay any attention to my posts in this thread, that would have been obvious to you.

    Perhaps though you understood me clearly and realize that I am actually quite opposed to linguistic domination and wish that the inevitable takeover of World English could be more readily prevented. If so, I must say you've done a poor job of communicating that with this snippet.



    Quote Originally Posted by Spjabork
    I wonder whether all those Ramirez, Gonzales, Mendoza, Castillo etc. etc. pp. with their brownish skin, quabbling some sort of "Americanish" will be so much interested in preserving Germanic traditions and values.
    Again, you've completely and utterly missed my point. The fact that English is being taken over by people who aren't English doesn't mean that they will preserve Germanic culture. On the contrary. They will destroy Germanic culture. Their creole (the bastardized form of English spoken by second-language users of it) will eventually wipe out all the native Germanic languages, including bona fide English.

    Nevertheless, the English themselves will stand in a position of greater power during the decline than any of the other Germanic peoples because of their investment in colonialization. It will eventually be their own undoing as well, but until then, they will be able to hang on to what they can of their culture long after the people of Iceland (just for example) are reduced to the moronic dialect of English Spoken By Foreigners.








    Quote Originally Posted by Nordgau View Post
    Regarding that discussion on the English language ... I'm not sure if I get it right, since he has refrained from clarifying or correcting something, but looking at the thread opener's formulation: "Which Germanic nation state or ethnic region in a multi-lingual state in Europe ..."--Doesn't he rather speak here of ethnic Germanic regions within the current multi-lingual states in Europe (e. g. Flanders in Belgium) than of a future pan-European multi-lingual greater state?
    That could be. The sentence as crafted is structurally ambiguous, so it would allow both interpretations equally well.

    Maybe we'll get lucky and he'll pose his question more clearly!

  9. #39
    New Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Last Online
    Wednesday, September 2nd, 2009 @ 11:53 PM
    Gender
    Age
    33
    Posts
    571
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    1
    Thanked in
    1 Post

    Re: Which Germanic nation excels presently?

    Quote Originally Posted by Siegfried View Post
    Luxembourg borders on France and Germany, and both French and German are official languages there. The popular dialect is of Germanic origin and though it has grown fairly distinct from German, I suppose many Luxembourgers would prefer French as a second language because it is also an official language there and not as easy to make sense of when your native tongue is Germanic.
    Lëtzebuergesch is a Middle Germanic tongue and not High German like Deutsch.

    In Luxemburg I've also noticed that they can understand, and often even speak, Dutch.


    Quote Originally Posted by Nordgau View Post
    It needs anyway some deciphering when statistics say this or that about the favoured "second language" of the Luxemburgers.
    They speak everything and cross-speak/understand it, as far as I've noticed when I was there. I've experienced how they speak three different languages in one and the same shopping mall, at the bakery French, in the bookstore German and at the supermarket Dutch!

    Me being interested in languages, that was a truly fascinating experience.



    The "national language" of the country is "Luxemburgish", and some web lexicons inform that German and French are learned as preferred "foreign languages".
    The language is Lëtzebuergesch. The language has lexical influences of German and French; although the ‘French’ often seems like latinized - Middle Franconian - Frankic, rather than standard post-Frankic (Romance) French.

    By the way, have you ever been to Luxemburg?


    The percentage of standard German in the newspapers there is somewhat about 95%
    Actually, from what I've seen, newspapers tend to be in French. (Don't ask me why).

    But I heard that Lëtzebuergesch is becoming more dominant and popular.


    also most books are printed in standard German, the education in school runs in standard German (in higher classes than French comes as additional language of instruction), the Luxemburgers preferentially watch German TV and so one.
    I don't know about this. Where did you read or hear this?


    "Luxemburgish" on the other side, is hardly used in written form, as a "standard language".
    The monarchy endorses Lëtzebuergesch.


    Actually Luxemburg still is what it has always been historically and culturally: a part of the German speech area.
    Historically yes, like I've said earlier, modern German is simply an adaption of Hochdeutsch.


    That the local German dialect of the region was made the "national language" was for political reasons in the 1980s, to point out that the country had an own identity and character and so on, but that didn't change the fundamental facts of the country's actual language situation.
    What are you talking about? Luxemburgers never voluntarily spoke a Hochdeutsch language. It's simply not indigenous to that region.

  10. #40
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Last Online
    Sunday, February 25th, 2007 @ 10:29 AM
    Subrace
    nordiſch-weſtiſch
    Location
    Deutſchland
    Gender
    Family
    Single
    Politics
    Volk und Raſſe
    Posts
    1,626
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    5
    Thanked in
    5 Posts

    Re: Which Germanic nation excels presently?

    Quote Originally Posted by Aistulf View Post
    Lëtzebuergesch is a Middle Germanic tongue and not High German like Deutsch.
    What do you mean with "Middle Germanic"? Germanic is divided in North Germanic, West Germanic and East Germanic (extinct).

    Luxemburgish is the more or less standardized dialect of Mosel-Frankish (Moselfränkisch). Mosel-Frankish belongs to West Middle German (Westmitteldeutsch) greater dialect area. West Middle German belongs to High German (Hochdeutsch).--That classification of the language is quite clear and is something that can hardly be question. Look for the classification of the language for example in the article "Lëtzebuergesch" in the Luxemburgish version of Wikipedia:

    http://lb.wikipedia.org/wiki/L%C3%ABtzebuergesch

    ("Héichdäitsch" in the classification scheme is High German.)

    The language is Lëtzebuergesch. The language has lexical influences of German and French; although the ‘French’ often seems like latinized - Middle Franconian - Frankic, rather than standard post-Frankic (Romance) French.
    I know that the tongue's own name is "Lëtzebuergesch". That, however, means nothing else than "Luxemburgish", and "Luxemburgish" is one of the common designations for that language in English; just as one speaks of "Faroese" when meaning a language with the own name "føroyskt".

    By the way, have you ever been to Luxemburg?
    Yes, more than once.

    Actually, from what I've seen, newspapers tend to be in French. (Don't ask me why).

    But I heard that Lëtzebuergesch is becoming more dominant and popular.
    That is without doubt a wrong impression, maybe due to the presence of much French papers in the "cosmopolitan" capital. Regarding Luxemburg's own, its native media landscape, however (e. g. Luxemburger Wort, Tageblatt, Lëtzebuerger Journal, Zeitung vum Lëtzebuerger Vollek), standard German clearly dominates. According to the Euromasaic language usage data for Luxemburg High German makes up 82% of the articles, followed by French with 16%. Luxemburgish holds 2%, mostly for rather "familiar" things like advertisements. Luxemburgish indeed got more popular for such things now, but it is far from coming close to something like a "dominant" status. The newspaper "Zeitung vum Lëtzebuerger Vollek" is a good example. The paper's title is in Luxemburgish. But if you bother visiting the homepage of the newspaper you'll realise that they use standard German for "normal" texts. Such a usage of Luxemburgish as standard language only for titles, mottos and so on, but then using standard German in all real texts, is not untypical. I noticed that also in books from Luxemburg.

    (The number of 95% I had in my mind from a different text, maybe was older, or from a study for only one special newspaper or with exclusion of that one solely-French newspaper that addresses primarily to foreign-country publicity.)

    I don't know about this. Where did you read or hear this?
    I read it in some text about language usage in Luxemburg. Since normal German dominates as standard language in written media, school, and since Luxemburg traditionally is part of the German language area, it wouldn't be abnormal if they watched mostly programs from the FRG; the Swiss also do.

    The monarchy endorses Lëtzebuergesch.
    Yes, indeed. But the example of the print media (above) shows that it is hardly used as written language.

    Historically yes, like I've said earlier, modern German is simply an adaption of Hochdeutsch.
    Luxemburgish is also a regional (Moselfränkisch) part, and standardised a split, of Hochdeutsch, and as standard or national language a relatively new one.

    What are you talking about? Luxemburgers never voluntarily spoke a Hochdeutsch language. It's simply not indigenous to that region.
    They speak indeed their Moselfränkisch (the pepole in Rheinland-Pfalz and saarland also do). But apart from the fact that Moselfränkisch, and thus Luxemburgish standard, is itself nothing but the indigenous variant of Hochdeutsch of that region, the traditional written language is normal (standard) German: The dominance of standard German as writing language (newspapers, books), the leading role of standard German as educational language in Luxemburg's schools is nothing but the nowerday "offshoot" of the fact that what now is Luxemburg has always belonged to the (High; standard) German language area. It isn't so that standard German would have been relatively recently imposed to that country. 100 or 150 years ago they appeared just as much (or even more) in standard German as they do today. It is the other way around: the standardisation of Moselfränkisch, its nobilation as written or "national" language, is something recent. (As far as I know ordinary standard German was also until World war II the language in which discussions normally took place in Luxemburg's parliament.) And Luxemburg's historical specialty is rather the existence of French as high-cultural superstratum, due to the Walloon regions that historically belonged to the Grand-Duchy.
    Last edited by Nordgau; Tuesday, February 6th, 2007 at 03:42 PM.
    Man ſei Held oder Heiliger. In der Mitte liegt nicht die Weisheit, ſondern die Alltäglichkeit.

    SPENGLER

Page 4 of 11 FirstFirst 123456789 ... LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •