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Thread: Anglo-Saxon treasures discovered in Loftus - Northumbrian Royal Cemetery

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    Anglo-Saxon treasures discovered in Loftus - Northumbrian Royal Cemetery

    Anglo-Saxon treasures discovered in Loftus

    Nov 20 2007 by Mike Morgan, Evening Gazette


    ARCHAEOLOGISTS have uncovered the North of England’s first known Anglo-Saxon Royal burial ground at a secret East Cleveland location.

    More than 100 graves, many containing treasures including ancient weapons and jewellery, have been uncovered at the excavation site near Loftus.

    The exciting finds include gold and silver brooches, dating back to the seventh century, which may have had connections with the Kings of Northumbria.

    The discovery by freelance archaeologist Steve Sherlock is being hailed by experts as “unparalleled in Anglo-Saxon England”.

    Tees Archaeology officer Robin Daniels said: “This is the only known Anglo-Saxon Royal burial site in the North of England.

    “It’s the most dramatic find of Anglo-Saxon material for generations.”
    Mr Sherlock discovered the site after examining an aerial photograph which showed evidence of an Iron Age site.

    Excavations began unobtrusively in 2005 and continued under Steve’s supervision with help from Tees Archaeology and local volunteers, working four-six weeks every summer.

    Their efforts have covered an area the size of half a football pitch near Loftus, unearthing a cemetery of 109 burials.

    Mr Sherlock, an archaeologist since 1979, said: “I knew the significance of the site straightaway after being involved in excavating an Anglo-Saxon cemetery at Norton.

    “A range of high status jewellery has been found, including glass beads, pottery, iron knives and belt buckles.

    “But five of the graves had gold and silver brooches and a further burial had a seax, a type of Anglo-Saxon knife.”

    He added: “One burial had been placed upon a bed with the lady dressed wearing three gold brooches, one of which is unparalleled in Anglo-Saxon England.

    “Quite who this person was we may never know, but she was alive at the time St Hilda was establishing the famous monastery at Whitby!”

    Now the Teesside coroner will conduct an inquest to decide whether they are “treasure trove” ahead of the finds being valued by a panel of experts from the British Museum.

    If it is a treasure it will become the property of the Crown and could go on show in a museum and the finders will receive a financial reward.

    If it is decided it is not a treasure then it will be returned to the finder.

    The finds were due to be publicly unveiled for the first time today by Redcar and Cleveland Council at Kirkleatham Museum, Redcar.
    http://www.gazettelive.co.uk/news/te...4229-20133293/
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    I am looking forward to seeing the designs and artwork. maybe there will be depictions of deities or something I can add to my full body tattoo

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    Can't thank you enough, Zyklop!
    Obviously these graves are of men and women closely related to King Oswiu himself, if that is they don't include him!
    Remarkable - how a field in Loftus revealed a royal anglo-saxon cemetery
    Published: 19th Nov 2007
    http://www.redcar-cleveland.gov.uk/P...2?OpenDocument
    ONE of the North East's most remarkable finds from Anglo Saxon times, painstakingly unearthed at a secret site in East Cleveland, will be publicly revealed for the first time at Kirkleatham Museum, Redcar on Tuesday, November 20.

    An aerial photograph, showing evidence of an Iron Age site, gave freelance archaeologist Steve Sherlock the first clues to what has been buried treasure, with royal Anglo Saxon links.

    Now Redcar & Cleveland Borough Council is looking forward to showing the fascinating finds, including gold and silver brooches, dating back to the seventh century that may have connections with the kings of Northumbria.

    The excavations, which began in 2005 and continued under Steve's supervision with help from Tees Archaeology and local volunteers, working four-six weeks every summer, have covered an area the size of half a football pitch near Loftus discovering a cemetery of 109 burials.

    Steve, an archaeologist since 1979, said: "I knew the significance of the site straightaway after being involved in excavating an Anglo Saxon cemetery at Norton, but I couldn't believe it - you don't find sites like this twice in your career.

    "And it's grown each year, the first year we found 30 graves, but I didn't expect to find any more, then in 2006 we found another 13 and this year has been even more spectacular, finding the fantastic plan of the site, actually showing a social order."

    He explained: "Whilst human bone does not survive because of the acidic soils, a range of high status jewellery was found, including glass beads, pottery, iron knives and belt buckles. Five of the graves had gold and silver brooches and a further burial had a seax, a type of Anglo-Saxon sword."

    The Teesside coroner needs to conduct an inquest to confirm the 'treasure' definition and the finds will then be valued by a panel of experts from the British Museum.

    Tees Archaeology is in no doubt about the historic value of the find. Officer Robin Daniels said: "This is the only known Anglo Saxon royal burial site in the North of England. It is the most dramatic find of Anglo Saxon material for generations - certainly something to get Beowulf excited about!"

    The Council's Cabinet Member for Culture, Leisure and Tourism Councillor Sheelagh Clarke said: "This is a fantastic discovery - and I'm so looking forward to seeing it on show in the Museum. It will be a superb attraction."

    Steve added: "One burial had been placed upon a bed with the lady dressed wearing three gold brooches, one of which is unparalleled in Anglo-Saxon England. Quite who this person was we may never know, but we can say she was alive at the time St Hilda was establishing the monastery at Whitby!

    "Preliminary analysis of the finest brooch suggests it was made with Merovingian gold, indicating possible continental links. The other brooches are all thought to have originated in Kent and so it is clear the people buried near Loftus had access to the best craftsworkers in Anglo-Saxon England."

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    I am SO excited!!!!!!!!!
    The suspense while waiting for these photos to appear on my browser with my slow connection! The adrenalin!!!!!
    ARCHAEOLOGISTS REVEAL JEWELS OF AN ANGLO SAXON PRINCESS AT KIRKLEATHAM MUSEUM
    By Richard Moss 21/11/2007


    The finds include spectacular gold jewellery believed to date from the middle of the 7th Century. Courtesy Tees Archaeology

    A series of remarkable finds from the only known Anglo Saxon royal burial site in the North of England were unveiled to the public for the first time at Kirkleatham Museum, Redcar on Tuesday, November 20.

    The finds, which include spectacular gold jewellery, weapons and items of clothing, were unearthed at Loftus, Teeside by freelance archaeologist Steve Sherlock together with volunteers and members of Tees Archaeology at a 109-grave site believed to date to the 7th century.

    An aerial photograph, showing evidence of an Iron Age site, gave Steve the first clues to the treasure-filled Anglo Saxon site, which are traditionally only found in the south of England.

    "I knew the significance of the site straight away after being involved in excavating an Anglo Saxon cemetery at Norton, but I couldn't believe it - you don't find sites like this twice in your career,” said Steve.

    "And it's grown each year, the first year we found 30 graves, but I didn't expect to find any more, then in 2006 we found another 13 and this year has been even more spectacular, finding the fantastic plan of the site, actually showing a social order."


    The site included an unparalleled arrangement of graves with an entrance way to the south. Courtesy Tees Archaeology

    Excavations began in 2005 and continued under Steve's supervision in four and six-week stints every summer, in the end the team uncovered an area the size of half a football pitch.

    The human remains had not survived because of the acidic soils, but what remained was a range of high status jewellery, including glass beads, pottery, iron knives and belt buckles. Five of the graves had gold and silver brooches and a further burial had a seax, a type of Anglo-Saxon sword.

    The site included a low burial mound and an unparalleled arrangement of graves with an entrance way to the south. Among the finds are three spectacular gold brooches, one of which is belived to be "unparalleled" in Anglo-Saxon jewellery.

    “It’s a gold brooch with red garnet settings,” said Steve, “it must have been commissioned from the best craftsmen in Anglo Saxon England and I think it would have been the jewellery of an Anglo Saxon Princess.”

    Steve believes there must be a connection between his Princess and St Hilda, who founded an abbey on Whitby Headland in 657AD.

    “I date the brooch to around 650 AD and I think this person must have known St Hilda. Whitby Abbey is only ten miles from the site and if they are not from the same family then I think they must be from the same social system.”


    After working on the site every summer, the team uncovered an area the size of half a football pitch near Loftus. Courtesy Tees Archaeology

    What makes the find even more remarkable is that Steve wasn’t originally looking for Anglo Saxon remains but rather the Iron Age site that sits on top of it. Once the Iron Age remains had been recorded, the remarkable series of graves were uncovered undisturbed by man or plough, sitting a mere 25 cm into the ground.

    “It’s the most spectacular site I have ever worked on,” said Steve, “On one site I have an Iron Age settlement with the remains of houses and floor surfaces, and underneath it a high status Anglo Saxon cemetery – two fantastic sites rolled into one.”

    A full valuation by experts at the British Museum is in the pipeline but archaeologists are working in partnership with the local council who are committed to acquiring the collection and displaying it in Kirkleatham Museum.


    Kirkleatham Museum
    Kirkleatham, Redcar, TS10 5NW, Redcar and Cleveland Borough Council, England
    T: 01642 479500
    Open: April-September Tues-Sun 1000-1700 Bank holiday Mon Open October-March 1000-1600
    Closed: Mon except Bank Holidays. Christmas through to New Year.
    http://www.24hourmuseum.org.uk/nwh_gfx_en/ART52061.html

    Around 650...

    Why don't they put NAMES to this?!?! It's easy done:

    This Lady is either
    Queen Acha, daughter of King Eadwine of Deira, and wife of King AEthelfrith of Bernicia and (possible) mother of Kings Osweald and Oswiu,

    Queen Coenburga, daughter of King Ceorl of Mercia, wife of King Eadwine,

    Queen AEthelburga daughter of King AEthelbeorht of Kent and second wife of King Eadwine (she died 647!!!!!!!),

    Breguswyth wife of Heroeric (the son of King AEthelric the brother of King Eadwine) and mother of St Hild,

    Queen Cyneburga daughter of King Cynegils of Wessex and wife of King Osweald,

    Queen Eanflaed, daughter of King Eadwine and wife of King Oswiu,

    Queen Riemmelth (Rhiainfelth), daughter of King Royth (Rhoedd) of Rheged and wife of King Oswiu,

    The daughter of King Uid (Foith) who married King Eanfrith of Bernicia, OR

    St AEbba Abbess of Coldingham, and sister to Osweald and Oswiu!!!!!!!

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    Northern Echo article:
    Gold found in Anglo-Saxon cemetery
    By Claire Burbage
    http://www.thenorthernecho.co.uk/dis...n_cemetery.php
    Comment | Read Comments (1)
    ARCHAEOLOGISTS have uncovered a 1,400-year-old burial ground filled with gold jewellery and ancient artifacts at a secret location in the North-East, it was revealed last night.

    Experts hailed the find as one of the best examples of an Anglo- Saxon burial ground ever uncovered - and may even have been the final resting place of a king or queen.

    The 109-grave cemetery was discovered on land in Loftus, east Cleveland.

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    It is arranged in a rectangular pattern and dates from the middle of the 7th Century.

    The cemetery, bed burial and high status objects are considered to all indicate the people buried must have connections with Anglo-Saxon royalty.

    The finds were unveiled at Kirkleatham Museum, in Redcar, east Cleveland, yesterday, where it is hoped they will eventually go on permanent display.

    An aerial photograph, showing evidence of an Iron Age site, gave archaeologist Steve Sherlock the first clues to the buried treasure.

    His finds include gold and silver brooches that may have connections with the kings of Northumbria.

    The excavations, which began in 2005 and continued under Mr Sherlock's supervision with help from Tees Archaeology and local volunteers, working four to six weeks every summer, have covered an area the size of half a football pitch.

    "This is the only known Anglo-Saxon royal burial site in the North of England. It is the most dramatic find of Anglo-Saxon material for generations."
    Robin Daniels, archaeological officer

    Mr Sherlock said: "I knew the significance of the site straight away after being involved in excavating an Anglo-Saxon cemetery at Norton, but I couldn't believe it - you don't find sites like this twice in your career.

    "And it's grown each year. The first year we found 30 graves, but I didn't expect to find any more.

    Then last year, we found another 13 and this year has been even more spectacular, finding the fantastic plan of the site, actually showing a social order.

    "While human bone does not survive because of the acidic soils, a range of high status jewellery was found, including glass beads, pottery, iron knives and belt buckles. Five of the graves had gold and silver brooches and a further burial had a seax - a type of Anglo-Saxon knife.

    "One burial had been placed upon a bed with the lady dressed wearing three gold brooches, one of which is unparalleled in Anglo-Saxon England. Quite who this person was we may never know, but we can say she was alive at the time St Hilda was establishing the monastery at Whitby."

    The Teesside coroner needs to conduct an inquest to confirm the treasure definition and the finds will then be valued by a panel of experts from the British Museum.

    Robin Daniels, of Tees Archaeology, said: "It is the most dramatic find of Anglo Saxon material for generations.

    "I was stunned - it is not the kind of site you expect to find in this part of the world. There is nothing to indicate that we should have a royal cemetery near Loftus."

    Traditionally, Anglo-Saxon royalty were always buried in the South of England and it is thought the royals buried at the Loftus site could be linked to the Kentish Princess Ethelburga, who travelled north to marry Edwin, King of Northumbria.

    Redcar and Cleveland Borough Council's cabinet member for culture, leisure and tourism, Councillor Sheelagh Clarke, said: "It is a great thrill for all of us - for everyone who has been involved with it. It was so poignant to see the children's and babies' graves. It brought home how hard life was for people in that day in age. It is quite incredible how they came to be here, but that is a million dollar question - how did a royal family come to be in Loftus?"
    Posted by: yrmenlaf, Durham on 9:35pm Tue 20 Nov 07
    Could this be the royal cemetery associated with Whitby? If so, it is appropriate that its discovery is announced so near to St Eanflæd's day on Saturday!
    Could this be the royal cemetery associated with Whitby? If so, it is appropriate
    Most certainly.
    Whitby and Loftus are not too far apart:


    The museum where they'll keep it is a bit to the west:


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    I will be FURIOUS if this ends up down in the British Museum in Lunden! :
    Don't think that will happen in this case. When are the East Angles going to get their King Raedweald's stuff back, for that matter?

    More pics!!
    http://www.gazettelive.co.uk/news/te...4229-20139363/
    Fight to keep rare treasures on Teesside
    Nov 21 2007 by Mike Morgan, Evening Gazette

    THE BATTLE is on to keep a priceless Royal Anglo Saxon hoard of jewels and other precious items on Teesside.

    One of the North of England’s most remarkable finds from Anglo Saxon times has been painstakingly unearthed by local archaeologists at a formerly secret site in East Cleveland.

    Yesterday, as it was publicly revealed for the first time at Redcar’s Kirkleatham Museum, experts described it as the “find of a lifetime”.

    Similar finds nationally are worth millions of pounds and a full valuation is already under way.

    But officials including Sheelagh Clarke, Redcar and Cleveland Council’s Cabinet member for culture, leisure and tourism, are determined to keep the jewels at Kirkleatham Museum “no matter what the cost” via grants and appeals.

    “This is the find of a generation,” she said. “It’s been a once-in-a-lifetime experience for the team of archaeologists and I hope many future generations will be able to come to Teesside to see how spectacular they are.”

    More than 100 graves were discovered when an aerial photo, showing evidence of an Iron Age site, gave freelance archaeologist Steve Sherlock clues to the “buried treasure”.

    The amazing finds, including gold and silver brooches dating back to the 7th century, look certain to have connections with the ancient Kings of Northumbria.

    Steve, 53, formerly of Redcar, described it as “the find of a lifetime”.

    The excavations began in 2005 and continued under Steve's supervision with help from Tees Archaeology and local volunteers, working four to six weeks every summer. They have covered an area the size of half a football pitch near Loftus, discovering a cemetery of 109 burials.

    The items are thought to have been buried after 650AD at the time St Hilda was trying to establish a monastery at Hartlepool and later at Whitby.

    There is currently no evidence that the woman of very high status buried on farmland at the site, known as Street House, is her. The site is about a mile north of Loftus and has also been used by ancient Britons and Romans.

    Steve, an archaeologist since 1979, said: "I knew the significance of the site straightaway after being involved in excavating an Anglo Saxon cemetery at Norton. But I couldn't believe it - you don’t find sites like this twice in your career. The first year we found 30 graves. Then in 2006 we found another 13 and this year has been even more spectacular.

    “The most important person, a woman, was buried laid on a wooden bed with special iron fittings. There are only a dozen such burials in England. While human bone does not survive due to acidic soils, a range of high status jewellery was found, including glass beads, pottery, iron knives and belt buckles.

    “Five of the graves had gold and silver brooches and a further burial had a seax, a type of Anglo-Saxon sword.”

    The coroner will conduct an inquest to confirm the ‘treasure’ definition and the finds will be valued by a panel of experts from the British Museum.

    Tees Archaeology officer Robin Daniels said: “This is the only known Anglo Saxon Royal burial site in the North of England. It’s the most dramatic find of Anglo Saxon material for generations.”

    Steve added: “One lady was buried dressed wearing three gold brooches, one of which is unparalleled in Anglo-Saxon England.

    “Who this person was we may never know, but we can say she may have been Royal and was alive at the time St Hilda was establishing the monastery at Whitby.”

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    Multimedia stuff!!!!!!!!! 0003:

    And more photos! 0000::betm1301:

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/tees/content/ar..._feature.shtml
    Ancient Treasure found on Teesside.
    An Anglo Saxon Royal Burial site has been found on Teesside. It dates back to 650AD, a total of 109 burials have been found and some of the finds have been described as being of the same quality as Sutton Hoo.

    Title: A King's Hoard? The Royal Hoard (Broadband)
    The Royal Hoard (56K)
    Subject: Robin Daniels from Tees Archaeology takes us through the finds.

    Archaeologists have also found gold and silver brooches at the secret site near Loftus, which could be the the only known Anglo Saxon royal burial site in the North of England.

    Many of the finds have been sent to the British Museum for examination, but atre thought to date back to the mid-seventh century and may have connections with the kings of Northumbria.

    Pictures of the Loftus Finds >
    The excavations were started two years ago by freelance archaeologist Steve Sherlock, who became interested in the area, after seeing an aerial photograph, which seemed to show evidence of iron age workings.

    The excavations were started two years ago by freelance archaeologist Steve Sherlock. He came in to talk to talk to us at BBC Tees to tell us all about it.

    Steve Sherlock speaks about the find. >
    Help playing audio/video

    One of the brooches appears to be of Merovingian gold and many of the finds suggest the people buried here moved in the highest social circles and wore the finest kind of jewellery in Anglo-Saxon England.

    The Teesside coroner now needs to conduct an inquest into the find, before it can be officially classified a "treasure trove". In the meantime, some of the artefacts have had their first public showing at Kirkleatham Museum.

    last updated: 20/11/07
    The site near Loftus


    Geophysical survey of the site.


    Gold brooch found with one of the burials.


    Gold brooch found with one of the burials.


    Gold brooch found with one of the burials.


    Gold brooches found with one of the burials.


    7th Century beads.


    7th Century bead.


    This stone clearly shows marks where its has been used to sharpen iron instruments.


    Glass and beads found at the site.

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    Well researched Oswiu -- even from such a distance! The golden brooch (third above) looks as though it ought to be a device upon the floor of some sacred castle !

    All remarkable stuff and so exciting for all those involved, I can well imagine. Why even maybe, it should stay in the north; who gets to make that decision I wonder ?

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    This is absolutely amazing to me, to find relics like these. I know I have completely missed my life's calling by not dedicating myself to archaeology or some related field. Wonderful news!

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    This could be a new pilgrimage for anglo saxon heathens.

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