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Thread: Ethnic German Groupings

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    Ethnic German Groupings

    Note that many of these groups have since migrated elsewhere. This list simply gives the region with which they are associated, and does not include the Germans from countries with German as an official national language, which are:
    In general, it also omits some collective terms in common use defined by political border changes where this is antithetical to the current structure. Such terms include:
    Roughly grouped:




    In the Americas, one can divide the groups by current nation of residence:
    …or by ethnic or religious criteria:
    In Africa, Oceania, and East Asia
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ethnic_German

    Interesting. I had no idea some of these groups existed. :

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    Quote Originally Posted by Fallen Angel View Post
    Interesting. I had no idea some of these groups existed. :
    Aye, the Bambrzy are new to me, though it seems debateable whether or not to call them 'Germans' as they themselves seem to have renounced that (unless of course, this was political expediency!!!), and are around half Polish anyway, it seems. Here's the info:

    Bambrzy
    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Fountain of Bamberka in a married woman's dress on Old Market in Poznań


    Girls wearing unmarried women's dresses during a Corpus Christi procession in Poznań-Jeżyce, a borough of Poznań

    Bambrzy (Poznańskie Bambry, German: Posener Bamberger) are the Poles of German origin, the descendants of Germans who moved from the area of Bamberg (Upper Franconia, Germany) to villages surrounding Poznań, Poland. The said villages had been destroyed during the Great Northern War and the subsequent epidemic of cholera.

    The following villages were populated with Bamberg settlers:

    1719 in Luboń
    1730 in Dębiec, Jeżyce, Winiary and Bonin
    1746 - 1747 in Rataje and Wilda
    1750 - 1753 in Jeżyce and Górczyn

    The condition for settlement was, according to the order of King August II of 1710, all newly-arrived foreign settlers in Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth had to be Catholic. In total, approximately 450 to 500 men and women came to Poland.


    In fact the dress of "Bamberka" is from the area of Czarnków, but it looks very similarThe Polonisation of this group was a voluntary act and happened very quickly. The settlers refused to build their own churches, prayed with Poles, and their children learned the Polish language. There were also many mixed marriages with Poles living there. At the end of the 19th century, during the Kulturkampf period, all Catholics in villages inhabitated by Bambrzy chose Polish nationality during Prussian and German censuses. In the late 19th century, the meaning of the word "Bamber" (singular form) became wider - it started to denote all people living in those villages, regardless of their ethnic or cultural background.

    Many of them were soldiers of the Polish army fighting in Great Poland Uprising. During the German occupation of Poland most of them, just as most Poles, were persecuted for their Polishness. After WWII, for some time, they were suspected of collaboration with the Germans.

    The advent of democracy in Poland in 1989 saw the beginning of a renaissance of the Bamber culture. The best-known aspect of this culture are the rich female dresses.

    If anyone reads Polski, here's the site of TOWARZYSTWO BAMBRÓW POZNAŃSKICH (Comradeship of Posen Bambers):
    http://www.bambrzy.poznan.pl/

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    Quote Originally Posted by Fallen Angel View Post
    Interesting. I had no idea some of these groups existed. :
    You may like this thread

    http://forums.skadi.net/showthread.php?t=1373
    "Cuando la Patria está en peligro, todo está permitido excepto no defenderla"
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    I don't know if you'd like to add this, but when I was living in Ohio there was alot of "German-American" communities(there were some people of Danish descent who were included into these communities), and the Amish of course, these groups were very similar to the Pennsylvania Dutch.


    My personal experience with these communities is largly with my mothers family, her family was from Stuttgart, later moved to Switzerland, then to the Rhineland then to America, in America they mixed with the Austrian Viehdorfer's, then the South German Kuehn's, the Kuehn lineage was Yankee Doodled into Keen, and they mixed with some English lines that had small Irish heritage, then lines with Swedish and Rhinelandic Palatinate German. My maternal family still has preserved some "Germanic" traditions during the holidays, but they're a bit Christianized to my dislike and the ceremonies used to be conducted in German until our last German fluent family member died, hopefully I can be the solution to the problem and revive the German linguistics in the ceremonies during the holidays. Their family largely identifies with the Stuttgart lineage more than anything else, it's frequently mentioned during any gatherings/social occasions. The sad thing is my paternal family, the bulk of their heritage is from North England and the Rhineland and Bavaria, yet they became highly Yankee Doodled and lost touch with the ancestors, being around my maternal family is what inspired me to take up my ancestral studies and I've uncovered much lost/forgotten information pertaining to my paternal line. The only non-Germanic lines in my family would be the few Irish lines, and I mean very very few, I think it's 8 out of the 103 established lineages, and 1 Celtic-Spanish line from my grandmothers family. Hopefully after I get my autosomal DNA results concluded I can find more lineages to add to the list, I assume they're going to be largely Germanic since I've been able to trace all the lineages to the European homelands and as previously mentioned the majority was from North and Eastern England, Germany, Switzerland, Austria, Sweden, and Benelux.

    The Amish I'd consider American Germanic since they are mainly composed of people who's ancestors were from Germany, Switzerland, and Benelux, however I've seen a few Amish lines with British ancestry, but it's largely English, so I guess they'd be considered Germanic too.

    That's just my two cents, sorry if I was a bit long winded, I tend to get going on a topic and then get side tracked. Have a good one.

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