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Thread: How Young Is Too Young for Birth Control?

  1. #11
    Senior Member Freydis's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Next World View Post
    That's your personal statement. Teens aren't given all or no responsibility with the issue. Personally, I care more about my right to deal with a headache without having to call my mom first to check if it's okay than I do about dealing with the prospect of pregnancy. If someone doesn't know by a certain age whether or not it is safe for them to take asprin, are they really qualified to have sex?
    Aspirin can seriously eff up a teenager's body. My mother says that I should not have it until I am 21. So I respect her choice and listen to her.
    A headache can be dealt with simply by waiting rather than taking a pill.

    I've not encountered this rule before. By that age, one is responsible enough to be accountable for one's own actions.

    I don't know who we are to say that, and I wasn't saying that. Who are we to say that parents don't have the right to know what's going on with their children?
    I do not want my parents knowing my entire life. I'm sorry, but it's not their life, it's mine. To want to know everything is to be too controlling.

    Personally, I think that the laws aren't really matched properly. If someone isn't able to be trusted with having sex, why are they trusted with taking care of their medical records?
    What is it to be "trusted with having sex"? I think medical records are less significant than having sex anyways.

    I suppose it's like how in the US, 18 year olds can register for the draft and vote, but they cannot drink (I know it's for medical/developmental reasons).
    The drinking age is stupid. Does it mean I'm stupid and diseased because I've drank alcohol occasionally since I was 12 and on a more regular (monthly) basis from 16, and then basically regularly now (age 18, probably around weekly)? Alcohol is not the worst thing.

    Or how in most states, a 16 year old can have sex with a 17 year old, but not a 19 year old.
    Generally the law is not what occurs in practise.

    Generally, I just don't like laws based off of age, but if they're going to do it, they might as well try to make it somewhat sensible.
    So it would be fine then, for me to have gone off with a (hypothetical) man ten years my senior when I was 17? Most of the time common sense prevails.

    I just don't think it's right that a school won't give a kid asprin because their parents won't pick up the phone, but they'll let them get birth control (or an abortion or a pregnancy test) without anybody knowing about it.
    Aspirin is more dangerous than birth control, but I think the minimum age at which one could start to take birth control be 16 years. But remember that birth control is not just to prevent pregnancy, it does other things also.

    I think the birth control is a bigger deal, personally, considering it messes with your hormones, is taken on a consisent basis, and can cause potentially fatal problems for people with blood/heart issues that teenagers usually aren't aware they have or even healthy people.
    Like I said, the age should be around 16 years when one can take birth control. However, I don't think it is a "bigger deal". It does not "mess with the hormones" so much as increase the level of one (or two). It is taken on a consistent basis for a reason... nothing will happen just taking it randomly. How many problems out of the millions of women who have taken birth control are there really? Same thing with aspirin, I guess.

    Here in the US, most teenagers are on their parents' insurance. If my mother's insurance was billed $565 dollars with a $5 co-pay, I think she might like to know what the hell the doctor and I decided to do and about what. And I'd think, considering that she pays for the insurance, it might be nice to tell her something, however vague it is.
    What exactly is this "insurance" and how does it work? It doesn't sound very good if you must pay so much every time you go to the doctor. I just go and wait and then see the doctor. Then I leave. *shrug* Maybe this system should go to the US also.

    But if your mother cares more about her money than she does about you, she's not a good mother, I'm sorry to say, especially on medical affairs.

    Unappealing to the independent young adult, I'm sure, but most people's parents do care about them and would rather keep them safe than keep them within their moral constraints,
    especially in our modern world, especially in the teen years.
    It's unappealing to me that my parents know everything I'm doing. It's not necessary. I don't ask them everything they're doing.

    My parents knowing something after the fact will do nothing to keep me "safe" from whatever I have done.
    People turn to poison as quick as lager turns to piss

  2. #12
    Senior Member Next World's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Freydis View Post
    Aspirin can seriously eff up a teenager's body. My mother says that I should not have it until I am 21. So I respect her choice and listen to her.
    A headache can be dealt with simply by waiting rather than taking a pill.
    Sex can also eff up a teenager’s body, or life. If your mother said that you should not have it until you were 21, would you respect “her choice” and listen to her in that case?

    The worst reported effects of aspirin are ulcers and gastrointestinal bleeding. This might sound major, but most people experience the latter on a somewhat regular basis without knowing it, especially people who consume “modern” food. Aspirin usually only causes these effects in people who have certain conditions or related tendencies. If you didn’t know it and you had one of these conditions, it wouldn’t be that hard to make up for whatever may or may not have happened. What’s more, aspirin is usually not consumed on a regular basis, except in the cases of older people. Teenagers going to the nurse’s office are looking to have at most one dose every few months. The effects of aspirin can be countered or prevented by consuming licorice or peppers. The effects of birth control can’t be countered by simply eating.

    Preventing pregnancy can be achieved with simply waiting rather than taking a pill.

    Oh blah blah blah, but some people might not want to wait! I don’t give a crap, I don’t want to wait to get over a bitch nasty headache, and I’m sure the people who take aspirin for cardiovascular help don’t just want to “wait” for clots to thin. I’m going to deal with the horrible possibility that I might get a small ulcer from taking an aspirin every couple months, if other girls want to deal with whatever resulting issues they may get from taking birth control daily, that’s fine, but I still don’t view it as a worthy investment. If they get Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome from it (which does happen) or start coughing up blood as a result (which does happen), I’m not going to feel sympathy for them. And I don’t expect anyone who supports birth control to feel sympathy for me if I shit blood when I take an aspirin (I’ve yet to have a problem.).

    By that age, one is responsible enough to be accountable for one's own actions.
    One would assume, as you obviously did, but plenty of 15 year olds are not responsible enough to be accountable for any of their own actions above the most basic.

    I do not want my parents knowing my entire life. I'm sorry, but it's not their life, it's mine. To want to know everything is to be too controlling.
    In your opinion. I didn’t say you had to tell your parents a damn thing. The point is, that if you are on a parent’s insurance, or living in their home, or in some other way, very dependent upon them in a physical sense, they should have the right to know that you are taking a drug of some sort on a regular basis. I’m not saying one should tell their parents who they have sex with or how often, or even if they are on birth control because they are sexually active. Most people I know who take birth control have told their parents, some of their mothers have even reminded them to take it, one of my friends switched brands because her mother read a lot of bad reports about the one she was on. Like I said, most parents care more about keeping their kids healthy than within their moral constraints.

    Generally the law is not what occurs in practice.
    Why shouldn’t laws be adjusted so that they do match either the most basic morality of the majority, or so that unnecessary laws are removed, then?

    So it would be fine then, for me to have gone off with a (hypothetical) man ten years my senior when I was 17? Most of the time common sense prevails.
    What do you mean “common sense”? You’re basing your view of the subject off of your personal morality. I’m 17; my last boyfriend is old enough to have a son who is in grade school. Does that mean that I am lacking in “common sense”? I don’t think it does, considering that I was responsible enough not to get pregnant off of, or even have sex with, him. I don’t think it does, considering that he’s a human being, just like people my age are, and we were able to have a deep and somewhat meaningful relationship. I think it would have been fine for you to have gone off with a man ten years your senior when you were 17, provided that you were both emotionally and mentally capable of acknowledging your own personal senses of right and wrong and acting upon them.

    There’s no reason a girl should be allowed to get an abortion legally when she can’t even have sex legally, though. The laws don’t match. That’s the point.

    Aspirin is more dangerous than birth control, but I think the minimum age at which one could start to take birth control be 16 years. But remember that birth control is not just to prevent pregnancy, it does other things also.
    Aspirin is more dangerous? What great Canadian medical source do you have to show that? As far as I’m concerned, as well as every doctor and sensible human being I’ve ever spoken to is concerned, that’s a load of bullshit. Sixteen should be the minimum age to start taking birth control, but only if it is also the age of consent. If the age of consent is lower, birth control should be available to younger people.

    I wonder how women managed to survive their “horrible” menstrual cramps before the pill was invented. What’s more, I wonder how teenage girls dealt with whatever lack of confidence they had over their minimally sized breasts before they started taking birth control to plump them up. It’d be nice if doctors prescribed a healthy lifestyle to deal with cramps, rather than birth control. The majority of girls I’ve met who take the pill because they have bad cramps could stand to drink more water, consume a more balanced and organic diet, and go out for a jog now and then. It’s a good thing those girls are so turned off by the thought of pregnancy; they probably wouldn’t have too fun of a time with childbirth.

    Like I said, the age should be around 16 years when one can take birth control. However, I don't think it is a "bigger deal". It does not "mess with the hormones" so much as increase the level of one (or two). It is taken on a consistent basis for a reason... nothing will happen just taking it randomly. How many problems out of the millions of women who have taken birth control are there really? Same thing with aspirin, I guess.
    For a while, the FDA was getting over 500 adverse effect complaints per month for a single brand of birth control. A different brand received over a thousand reports per month. It is estimated that the FDA only receives reports for between 1% and 10% of adverse effects. In less than one year, 46 women received major injuries or died as an adverse effect of a single brand of birth control. One woman who was using “the patch” version of birth control, as opposed to an oral contraceptive, had a stroke as a result and became paralyzed after less than two weeks of using it (two weeks of patch dosage is about equal to a month of pill usage, while most estrogen is passed through waste, not all of it is). Adverse effects of estrogen use include blood clots in the legs or lungs as well as heart attack and stroke. The brand that is allegedly rated the “safest” (is of course, also one of the least effective) only claims to receive reports of adverse effects for %.006 of their sales. Convincing your body that it is pregnant when it is not? Not healthy. I thought that was common sense.

    Another problem associated with birth control is polycystic ovarian syndrome. If your body doesn’t respond to birth control how it is anticipated, it will not say, “Oh, I’m pregnant, no more period.”, it will say, “Oh, I’m making way too much estrogen... I should slow it down.”. Then, you really won’t need to take birth control. POS has the same effects as steroids (excessive hair growth, halted period, so on). It takes women anywhere from 2 to 20 years to get over, if they ever do. I’ve met a lot of women who have gotten this problem from birth control. It’s one of the things my doctor specializes in. Not everyone’s body responds to hormones how the majority do, and each body isn’t necessarily going to respond the same way each time.

    I think the strange part of even needing to argue this can be put in one small sentence; birth control has killed people, and aspirin has not. The more interesting piece of the puzzle is that aspirin has even been used to save the lives of people having heart attacks–some of them very well may have had blood clots as a result of their birth control. Kind of funny. Ha ha ha.

    But really, why would anyone argue that the effect of a hormone-based pill taken on a daily basis is less harmful than that of aspirin, which is intended to be used seldomly? Can you even compare the two? Sure. People who take aspirin on a daily basis for cardiovascular (and now even colon, I believe) health still have less negative reprocuctions on average than those who take birth control on a daily basis for any reason.


    What exactly is this "insurance" and how does it work? It doesn't sound very good if you must pay so much every time you go to the doctor. I just go and wait and then see the doctor. Then I leave. *shrug* Maybe this system should go to the US also.
    We pay $5 each time we go to the doctor. Personally, I don’t think it’s that big of a deal. My health is worth more to me than two candy bars. The insurance company gets charged for the balance. Part of the money my mother makes each year goes to her insurance plan. Hers is very fair because she is a state employee. When I go to the doctor’s office, everyone who puts in each year to the insurance company’s money gets pulled and a percentage of it is used to pay for my visit. I do my part to keep the cost of insurance low by staying healthy and only getting procedures I deem necessary. That’s another thing with making birth control free for kids–somebody is paying for it. I don’t want to pay for a twelve year old’s birth control, nor do I want to pay for a smoker’s lung transplant. And that’s why your country’s lame system really doesn’t work out. Your “free” healthcare isn’t actually free. The money needs to come from somewhere. And most of the hardworking taxpayers of my country don’t want to pay for the surgeries, medications, and doctor’s visits of people who live unhealthy lifestyles by choice. As far as I know–we get what we pay for, and you do too.

    But if your mother cares more about her money than she does about you, she's not a good mother, I'm sorry to say, especially on medical affairs.
    Uh. She’s not only an excellent mother, but a good member of the community. The one downfall of our insurance system is that a few people don’t check their routine statements. If we have a note that says I got a $700 procedure on such and such a date, I should be able to clarify for my mother that it is something I actually did. If I don’t verify that what is marked is what I underwent, then the insurance company might get charged for something that didn’t happen, and insurance rates would go up. It’s one of those little acts of personal responsibility that most citizens choose to undertake. My old French teacher’s daughter once got a report for a $3,000 procedure. She had gotten a broken bone realigned for $600. Madame had no idea how much would be charged for that kind of procedure, there wasn’t a co-pay on it. She called the insurance company to check what the bill was for. Turns out they had been billed for a post-breast cancer implantation job that neither of them had gotten.

    My mom asks me to verify the procedures I have done, and I do it gladly. Just the same as I let her know that yes, I did buy $150 worth of books from Amazon, and yes, I did sell something on e-bay, which explains the piddley charge of a few cents on her credit card statement.

    My mother doesn’t give a crap about what I buy. She just wants to know that we, or the insurance company, are being charged the right amount for it. I guess it’s horrible when people don’t like getting ripped off, huh. She does care about my health, though. That’s why I tell her when I have concerns, or if I think I need a procedure or pills.


    My parents knowing something after the fact will do nothing to keep me "safe" from whatever I have done.
    Ever think your parents might know something you don’t? A lot of older women take birth control, too. If I were a mother, I wouldn’t want my daughter using “the patch”, because it’s almost twice as likely to cause problems as the pill. If she absolutely insisted upon being sexually active, I would do my best to help her find the best contraceptive method for her. Like you said, one pill won’t do much; over time it can be the difference between life and death, though. I’m sorry other people don’t think they can trust their parents or consult with them as educated friends. I thought that most people who were adult enough to be having sex were adult enough to discuss matters of health and life with their parents.




    I don’t know, maybe I just don’t understand because I don’t take the pill. Or maybe I don’t understand because I know my mother loves me and cares more about my welfare more than whether or not I do exactly what she wants.
    Polygamy: it might not be for you, but what right do you have to keep it from me?

  3. #13
    Senior Member Freydis's Avatar
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    Next World, I'll respond to you later when I have time to read through a wall of text. But in the meantime, I'll go back to having my body implode and no blood flow whatsoever through my body as my mother didn't love me enough to tell me not to take birth control to regulate my hormonal cycle.

    PS: I don't see anyone discussing their sex life with their parents. That's just completely awkward.

    <3 freydis.
    People turn to poison as quick as lager turns to piss

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