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Thread: Post a Random Fact About Germanics

  1. #31
    Senior Member Soten's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dr. Solar Wolff View Post
    There were many German speaking Americans in those days, particularly in Pennsylvania and New York. At this time there was a debate about a national language and the German speakers pushed for German. It was not to be and English was decided upon.
    Yeah, I'm related to some of those Pennsylvania Germans. I think the German or English as national language story is a bit exaggerated. Surely, the Germans wanted to continue with there language being taught in their own schools and so on in PA, but I don't think it ever had a shot as a national language. None of the top leaders spoke German and the entire South was English speaking and most of New England.

    Let me find a good fact now...

    The first German immigrants in America came seeking land and the promise of religious freedom. They had heard that both could be found in the newly chartered colony of Pennsylvania, which was governed by a Quaker, William Penn.

    Francis Daniel Pastorius, an agent for a land purchasing company in the city of Frankfurt am Main, organized the original party of settlers. It was a group largely made up of German Quakers and Mennonites from the Rhineland.

    Pastorius preceded the settlers to America, arriving in Philadelphia in mid-August, 1683. He negotiated with Penn for a tract of land northwest of Philadelphia on which to build a settlement, which was to become known as "Germantown." Six weeks later, on October 6, 1683, the ship Concord sailed into Philadelphia's harbor from Germany. On board were thirteen families.

    The German settlers felt an immediate kinship to their new home, since Pennsylvania's rolling hills and fertile plains resembled the terrain of the land they had left behind. Their glowing accounts of life in the New World soon prompted other German immigrants to follow their lead. Settlers representing a variety of Protestant religious groups began descending on Germantown. By 1689, the settlement had grown so large that it had to be incorporated.

    The spirit of the Germantown settlement was summed up by the words inscribed over the door of Pastorius' cottage. They promised "no words of welcome to the godless and profane." Germantown's citizens were pious, peaceful, industrious people, who quickly established southeastern Pennsylvania as a leading agricultural region.

    Over the centuries, the community has continued to cling to the language and culture of its native land. Descendants of the first German immigrants are called Pennsylvania Dutch - an Anglicization of the word "deutsche" meaning "German."
    Here are some examples of how the PA Dutch (used to) speak:

    “Throw Papa down the stairs his hat.” Explanation: Throw Papa’s hat down the stairs to him. (I don't care how old he is, don't you dare touch ole Papa!)

    “Go out and tie the dog loose and don’t forget to outen the light.”

    This expression uses convoluted grammar in addition to “Germanic” verbalizations. Here the verb “outen” means “to turn out”. The adjective and noun are used in reverse order from other forms of Standard English.

    “The owner says he’ll pay me ten dollars a day if I eat myself, but just five dollars if he eats me.”

    Explanation: No, there’s no cannibalism here! The worker will get ten dollars a day for providing his own meals, but five dollars a day if the owner has to provide the worker’s food. (Whew! I'm glad we cleared that one up!)

    “He’s a pretty good man yet, ain’t not?” Explanation: He’s a pretty good man (provider), isn’t he? (a tag question form)

    Use of Specialized Vocabulary

    Addition of specialized, but “local” vocabulary is also quite commonly done as demonstrated in these examples.

    “Shall I put the candy in a toot?” (A “toot” is a paper bag.)

    If you don’t speak “Pennsylvania Dutch” in one of its multiple forms, they just might say of you: “You don’t make yourself out so good. You talk so fancy like a body can’t understand you.”

    When talking about that fact that his father or grandfather is sick a child might say: “Pop ain’t so good; his eatin’s gone away and he don’t look so good in the face, either.”
    Personally, these in this next block don't sound so weird to me. All I see wrong with the first one is the use of "ain't". :

    Speaking about his son’s difficulties in school a father could be heard to express the following sentiments: “My son ain’t dumb. It ain’t that he can’t learn, it’s just that after he learns it, he forgets it.”

    In talking about someone who doesn’t read aloud well, at a meeting or in school for example, people might say something like: “When he gets up to read he gets befuddled.”

    Or how about this amusing little observation of another person’s speech: “Don’t talk so quick, it runs together too much when I think.”
    Pennsylvania Dutch Proverbs

    Some interesting Pennsylvania Dutch proverbs include these offerings:

    “Kissin’ wears out, cooking don’t”

    “No woman can be happy with less than seven to cook for”

    “A plump wife and a big barn never did any man harm”

    “He who has a secret dare not tell it to his wife”

    “Ve get too soon oldt, und too late schmart”
    I still here people say "outen the lights". Even I will put an "en" at the end of some verbs like in German, such as "I had boughten" for "I had bought". People have told me of some other things people from around here say that are odd but I don't remember them because it seemed pretty normal to me.

  2. #32
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    The black sun design has loose visual parallels in Migration Age Alemannic brooches (Zierscheiben), possibly a variation of the Roman swastika fibula, thought to have been worn on Frankish and Alemannic women's belts. Some Alemannic or Bavarian specimens incorporate a swastika symbol at the center. The number of rays in the brooches varies between five and twelve.


    Die Sonne scheint noch.

  3. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dagna View Post
    The black sun design
    I wonder, could anyone tell me when and how the design received that name? How authentic is the name? :

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    I think this goes for Norway too... Sometimes we have the sense that we're one thing and Europe another. The other day on a course I attended, the teacher was talking about the weather (just before class so to speak) and mentioned "it's no better in Europe" (cold even though it's May).

    I like. But I believe it was more like this before, this sense is dying.

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    Senior Member Leonhardt's Avatar
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    The hex signs decorate the barns in PA Dutch country.
    Hex signs are a form of Pennsylvania Dutch folk art, related to Fraktur, found in the Fancy Dutch tradition in Pennsylvania Dutch Country.[1] It is claimed by some to be of a talismanic nature, and by others to be purely decorative, or "Chust for nice" in the local dialect. Amish do not use hex signs.[2]
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hex_signs
    This is a link to a page of hex sign pictures.
    http://images.google.com/images?hl=e...h+Images&gbv=2

    My ancestors were "Pennsylvania Dutch".
    The Pennsylvania Dutch (perhaps more strictly Pennsylvania Deitsch, Pennsylvania Germans or Pennsylvania Deutsch) are the descendants of German immigrants who came to Pennsylvania prior to 1800.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pennsylvania_Dutch

    There are many other people in Pennsylvania who claim to be the descendants of Hessians.
    About the German Hessians who came to the United States to fight against the Americans and remained.
    http://www.trivia-library.com/a/unit...ica-part-2.htm

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    Senior Member Leonhardt's Avatar
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    A brief history of . . .Wisconsin Demographics
    In 1890, about one-half of Wisconsin's 519,199 immigrants were native of German.
    http://www.scils.rutgers.edu/~dalbel...ographics.html
    These days I think many people are mixed Germans.(and also British)

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    Senior Member Leonhardt's Avatar
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    Teufelsberg (German for Devil's Mountain) is a hill in Berlin, Germany, in former West Berlin. It rises about 80 meters above the surrounding Brandenburg plain, more precisely the north of Berlin's Grunewald forest.

    It is an artificial hill with a curious history: it was built by the Allies after the Second World War from the rubble of Berlin during the following twenty years as the city was rebuilt. One estimate for the amount of rubble is about 12 million cubic meters, or about 400,000 buildings. It is higher than the highest natural hill (the Kreuzberg) in the Berlin area.

    Teufelsberg's origin does not in itself make Teufelsberg unique, as there are many similar man-made rubble mounds in Germany and other war-torn cities of Europe. The curiousness begins with what is buried underneath the hill: a Nazi military-technical college designed by Albert Speer. The Allies tried using explosives to demolish the school, but it was so sturdy that covering it with debris turned out to be easier.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Teufelsberg

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    Senior Member Jute's Avatar
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    There are cats native to the northeast USA [living there when whites first arrived], that are the same genetically as cats native to Iceland.

    This is more proof that we settled in that part of America in the 900s-1000s AD. ["Vinland" cannot apply to the harsh climate of Newfoundland, so it must be more south]. But those settlements ended in tragedy. Our second attempt in the same region, in the 1600s, was more successfull.

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