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Thread: Germanic Jewelry and Grave Goods (from Die Goten by Felix Dahn)

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    Wonderful. let's continue this thread.

    Ivory buckle from the tomb of St. Caesarius of Arles, Notre Dame la Major. 6th c. Perhaps showing two soldiers attending Christ's tomb. While the buckle's style is Burgundian, the subject matter is based on the earlier Italo-Roman treatment, and the use of ivory is also Mediterranean. Reflects 6th-century fusion of Roman and Germanic culture.




    Tin-plated bronze buckle showing Daniel in the lions' den. Burgundian 7th c. (?). (Lausanne: Mus. cant. d'Arch.)



    Alemann round fibula from a princess' grave in Wittislingen. 7th c. A.D. (München: Prähist. Mus.) A 3.25" gold disk with inlaid garnet, filigree, and cloisonné. Four pairs of twined serpents with gaping mouths form a cross. Round fibula are probably derived from a late Roman design. Not only did the culture and law of the Alemann aristocracy survive Frankish hegemony, but ducal independence in the Frankish frontier zone actually increased under the late Merovingians. Bythe early 8th c. the dukes had become independent. Their vitality has been associated with their Christianization by Irish missionary monks, as manifested by the cross on this fibula.




    Frankish looped fibula from a princess' grave in Kölner Dom. First half 6th c. A.D. (Köln: Röm-germ. Mus.) 3 in. Gold with garnets and cloisonné, showing Lombard influence.




    The Xanten Brooch. Lower Rhine Frankish silver-gilt fibula. Design is a steppe motif, probably derived from the Goths. 6th c. A.D.




    Franco-Burgundian round fibula from a Charnay les Macon grave of 6-7th c. A.D. (St. Germain en Laye, Mus. d'Antiq.) A Frankish product, but with Burgundian influences.




    Frankish griffin fibulae. 7th c. (New York: Metropolitan Museum of Art). 2.5 in. It is possible that this design derives from the textiles being imported from Egypt.



    Silver repousé Eastern Vandal grave goods from Sakrau, Silesia, and from Nitra, Czechoslovakia.



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    Detail of gilded copper repoussé helmet plaque with a representation of the Lombard King Agilulf, late 6th c. A.D. (Firenza: Mus. Naz. del Bargello). The Lombard dukes were fairly independent, which enabled the Franks to intervene and make the Lombards tributary. It was only with King Agilulf (590-616 A.D.) that a firm unified leadership was established in the North that gained independence from the Franks. This plaque is the first known attempt in Germanic art to represent a king enthroned, and it manifests the Lombard adoption of Roman figurative art and models, with Byzantine influences. The Lombard leadership had been nominally Christian even before entry into Italy, and so they were ideologically Roman.




    Chased bronze griffin shield ornament from Ischlander Alz grave. Lombard, 7th c. A.D. (München: Prähist. Mus.). 3.25 in. Northern in style and in its figurative conception.




    Gilt caste bronze appliqué shield ornament, from a warrior's grave at Stabio. Lombard, 7th c. A.D. (Berne: Hist. Mus.). 4 in. Probably an Italian armorer drawing on a Roman model to supply the need of a Lombard aristocrat to ape the Roman life-style to legitimate his official power.




    Caste bronze shield ornament representing a lion. Lombard, 7th c. A.D. (Berne: Hist. Mus.). Reflects influence of Late Roman figurative realism. These bronze plaques provide some access to the cultural world of the Lombard aristocracy.




    The Cividale Disk (bracteate). A Lombard gold stamped disk from an Udin grave showing a warrior and interlaced animals. Ca. 600 A.D. (Cividale: Mus. Arch.) 1.8 in. Derives from holy warrior slaying the dragon theme in both Christian and pagan antiquity.



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    Gothic polychrome eagle-head belt buckle from South Russia. 4th century A.D. The eagle motif derives from East Asia and results from the participation of the forebears of the Goths in the Hunnic Empire.




    Ostrogothic fibula. Gold plates attached to a silver core and inlaid with garnets. 4th c. A.D. (New York: Metropolitan Museum). 6.25" The Gothic interest in fibula is adopted from Late Roman imperial emblems of rank at the imperial court.




    Eagle-headed fibulae from the Pietrossa Treasure, Roumania, first half 5th century. This hoard from the Danube valley is highly controversial. It seems to have been collected by an Ostrogoth in the first half of the 5th c., but contains some objects significantly older. The eagle motif is problably Hunnic and picked up by Goths serving within the Hunnic Empire. The heavy collars in the collection are pagan and Gothic, and the polychrome technique is early 5th-century Gothic. So the treasure reflects Roman, Gothic and Hunnic influences.




    Another image of the eagle-headed fibula from the Pietrossa Treasure (Bucharest: Acad. Inst. de Arch.) 10 in. , with garnet inlay and crystal spangles. This reflects Gothic polychrome technology of the early 5th c., but the design reflects Hunnic, Imperial, and pagan-Gothic influences.




    Ostrogothic looped eagle head fibula from a female grave at Desana, Italy. Ca. 500 A.D. (Turin: Mus. Vic.). Gold with enamel, garnet and emerald inlays. By wearing rich fibula, the top Ostrogothic aristocracy could gave tangible expression to its imperial service as the Roman court aristocracy had previously done.



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    Anglo-Saxon round fibula from the Kingtson Find. 7th c. A.D. (Liverpool Mus.) 3.25 in. Gold cloisonné with garnet and gemstone inlays. The round fibula is a late Roman motif.




    Vendel silver fibulae from Swedish graves, based on Late Roman models. Inlaid with impressed gold sheet and embellished with applied rosettes




    Vendel silver gilt fibula from Öland Island, ca. 400-450 A.D. (Stockholm: Statens Sjöhist. Mus.).




    Vendel sword hilt from Grave V, Snartemo Hägebostad, Vest Agder, Norway. Hilt is repoussé Early 6th c. A.D. The gold plate grips and silver gilt mount at the mouth of the scabbard are in Style I.




    Gilt bronze strap end. Vendel Style II. From a 7th-century grave in Uppland, Sweden. The design is a fantastic animal mask.



    Vendel zoomorphic interlaced metalwork. Booty from middle Sweden. Upper and right objects are from 7th century, and middle and lower objects are from the 8th c.



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    Germanic Grave Goods

    I came across a webpage showing some Frankish gravegoods today, those of Queen Arnegunde, wife of King Clotaire I:


    http://www.saint-denis.culture.fr/en/2_2_aregonde.htm
    I love looking at this sort of thing, so I thought I might start a thread, and ask that other members post links to similar masterpieces from our Golden Age!

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    Thank you everyone for this Topic. Being a Student of Archeology, these Topics fascinate me. Here my Contribution of Images:

    From Buda History Museum:

    Sarmatian and Germanic grave goods



    Sarmatian and Germanic artefacts



    Sarmatian and Germanic jewellery



    Germanic comb and fibulae



    Germanic bead necklace



    Germanic peoples' grave goods





    Germanic silver bowls of the Avar period



    Germanic silver gilt drinking vessels of the Avar period


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    Thank you for contributing to my thread. I have some more to add as well, I believe.



    This picture shows a reconstruction of the burial chamber from mound 1 - Sutton Hoo. The rare custom of ship-burial is known only from Suffolk and Sweden.




    After excavation of the Sutton Hoo burial mounds in Suffolk, the finds were studied and dated. Broken and crushed fragments were reassembled. One of the reassembled items was a helmet. It was decorated with figures similar to those found in Sweden and Germany.




    The bronze hanging bowl was found in a cemetery at Sutton Hoo, Suffolk in 2000. It contained a cremation and a comb and was resting on textiles. Close by was a pot containing cremated bone and four other cremations. Hanging bowls were rare objects and the owner was probably an important person. Possibly the other burial wanted to be near the owner of the bowl.



    Anglo-Saxon decorated pot found in the cemetery near West Stow, Suffolk. It contained the ashes of a dead Saxon. Saxons often placed cremated ashes in a pot with small personal possessions. Picture taken at West Stow, Suffolk - August 2006.




    The graves of the dead from long ago can teach us a lot about their customs and beliefs as well as provide evidence of what important to them and how they lived their lives. When archaeologist unearthed the burial chamber in mound 1 they were amazed at what they found. Treasures, weapons and sacred objects. English gold ornaments English gold ornaments and Bayxantime silver, were laid out in the centre of the ship. The treasure was removed and stored until the end of World War 2.



    In mound 17 a horse and a young man about 25 years old were buried side by side. He was dressed as a warrior with a shield and sword; the horse had a beautiful harness. The horse sacrifice was only made to warriors of very high standing in noble cemeteries. The discovery was made in 1991.




    Sword and Ceremonial 'whetstone' or 'sceptre', with a bronze stag at the top. It was found at Sutton Hoo and is now in the British museum. Picture taken summer 2006.




    Replica of the great gold buckle found at Sutton Hoo in Burial mound 1. The Archaeologists were amazed at the amount of treasure found.




    Typical grave goods of a warrior.




    Items found in a grave near West Stow, Suffolk.


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    Viking beads



    Viking beads


    Viking necklaces


    Viking board game pieces


    Scans from The Viking World by James Campbell

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