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Thread: Revival of Anglo-Saxon Language

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Angelcynn Beorn View Post
    Is this what you're talking about?
    http://www.refstar.ru/data/r/id.5227_1.html
    It's mentioned in the bibliography down at the bottom, but this text in particular is something else - similar style, though.

    The one I have is:
    Rastorgueva T.A. ‘A History of English’, Moscow, 1983, 347p.
    Mine's a light paperback, nice and tattered and faded, in pink.

    I've just done a little search on Yandex.ru, and Oh No! There's a fancy new modern edition! :eek:

    Poor young post Soviet Russian kids... Russia's just not Russia when it's not good old days style Russia!

  2. #12
    Senior Member Soten's Avatar
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    Does enough of the Anglo-Saxon language survive that we would be able to "revive" it? By this I mean could it be used as a conversational language and spoken language? Would I be able to describe in Anglo-Saxon all my experiences and the things I saw while out walking my dog just as easily as describing some ancient battle?


    I'm sure more basic uses of the language survive but from my own experience I've only ever seen Beowulf-type sagas and so forth in Anglo-Saxon.

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    Senior Member æþeling's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by Soten
    Does enough of the Anglo-Saxon language survive that we would be able to "revive" it? By this I mean could it be used as a conversational language and spoken language? Would I be able to describe in Anglo-Saxon all my experiences and the things I saw while out walking my dog just as easily as describing some ancient battle?
    I would say the answer to that is yes, Old English has the richest vernacular literature outside of the ancient Greek and Latin languages. I don't think it would be impossible to communicate using just Old English
    Wita sceal geþyldig, ne sceal no to hatheort ne to hrædwyrde, ne to wac wiga ne to wanhydig, ne to forht ne to fægen, ne to feohgifre ne næfre gielpes to georn, ær he geare cunne. Beorn sceal gebidan, þonne he beot spriceð, oþþæt collenferð cunne gearwe hwider hreþra gehygd hweorfan wille.

    http://www.odinic-rite.org/index2.html
    http://www.steadfasttrust.org.uk/

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    Senior Member Soten's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by æþeling View Post
    I would say the answer to that is yes, Old English has the richest vernacular literature outside of the ancient Greek and Latin languages. I don't think it would be impossible to communicate using just Old English
    Well, in that case sign me up! Haha, I've always wanted to learn anyway, especially after taking such an interest in Tolkien's work.

    I should finish my German studies first though... Speaking of which, what language still in existence today would be most helpful to learn if you later wanted to learn Old English? German might be helpful in some ways but is Icelandic even more similar?

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    Senior Member Angelcynn Beorn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Soten View Post
    Well, in that case sign me up! Haha, I've always wanted to learn anyway, especially after taking such an interest in Tolkien's work.

    I should finish my German studies first though... Speaking of which, what language still in existence today would be most helpful to learn if you later wanted to learn Old English? German might be helpful in some ways but is Icelandic even more similar?
    At a guess - and i'm no language expert - i would say Frisian is probably your best bet. It's still considered the most closely related language to English today, and has escaped many of the Latinisms and French influences that have effected English.
    I am Ripper... Tearer... Slasher... Gouger.
    I am the Teeth in the Darkness, the Talons in the Night.
    Mine is Strength... and Lust... and Power!
    I AM BEOWULF!

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    Senior Member sophia's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Angelcynn Beorn View Post
    At a guess - and i'm no language expert - i would say Frisian is probably your best bet. It's still considered the most closely related language to English today, and has escaped many of the Latinisms and French influences that have effected English.
    I am really tempted to learn one of the rarer Frisian dialects. I am just not sure how to go about it (except perhaps spending a year or two on the continent - or one of the islands).
    A* I’m a dreadful reactionary, Mrs. Helena. I don’t like this progress one bit.
    H* Like Nana.
    A* Yes, like Nana. Does Nana have a prayer book?
    H* A big fat one.
    A* And are there prayers in it for various occurrences in life? Against storms? Against illness?
    H* Against temptation, against floods -
    A* But not against progress, I suppose?
    H* > I think not.
    A* That’s a shame.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Soten View Post
    Speaking of which, what language still in existence today would be most helpful to learn if you later wanted to learn Old English?
    THe hardest bit about Old English is the case system, and the various verb stems.
    From this more morphological or structural point of view, I wouldn't actually recommend a modern Germanic language, strange and paradoxical as it may sound! All have experienced decay of endings. None retain a fully working case system.

    Therefore, I'd recommend an Indo European language that hasn't been to Romanised, or picked up too many peculiar phonetic traits (Indian and Armenian out!). Obviously learning one dead language to help you learn another is not an option, so if you want a fairly conservative type of IE language, so that you can see how these structural peculiarities work in real life, I'd suggest spending some time in a Slavonic or Baltic country. The South Slavs have picked up some odd stuff in their wanderings, and Bulgarian is as decayed and shot to pieces morphologically as modern English is. The westernmost Slavonic languages are full of Germanisms, and have nasty consonants, Polish even having awful nasal vowels. Russian or Latvian or Lithuanian, then. Balts all understand Russian and speak English, mind...

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    Senior Member Angelcynn Beorn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Oswiu View Post
    THe hardest bit about Old English is the case system, and the various verb stems.
    From this more morphological or structural point of view, I wouldn't actually recommend a modern Germanic language, strange and paradoxical as it may sound! All have experienced decay of endings. None retain a fully working case system.

    Therefore, I'd recommend an Indo European language that hasn't been to Romanised, or picked up too many peculiar phonetic traits (Indian and Armenian out!). Obviously learning one dead language to help you learn another is not an option, so if you want a fairly conservative type of IE language, so that you can see how these structural peculiarities work in real life, I'd suggest spending some time in a Slavonic or Baltic country. The South Slavs have picked up some odd stuff in their wanderings, and Bulgarian is as decayed and shot to pieces morphologically as modern English is. The westernmost Slavonic languages are full of Germanisms, and have nasty consonants, Polish even having awful nasal vowels. Russian or Latvian or Lithuanian, then. Balts all understand Russian and speak English, mind...
    I was actually considering learning Russian for a while myself. But the thought of learning a completely new alphabet, and trying to get the 'flow' of the language right is actually quite daunting.

    Whenever i listen to Russians speak i often get the impression of somebody playing a tape backwards for some reason. :p
    I am Ripper... Tearer... Slasher... Gouger.
    I am the Teeth in the Darkness, the Talons in the Night.
    Mine is Strength... and Lust... and Power!
    I AM BEOWULF!

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    Quote Originally Posted by æþeling View Post
    Old English deserves at least the same recognition as Latin or Greek in English universities and maybe colleges.
    Generally, indigenous and other (Celto-)Germanic culture needs more recognition in universities here in the UK. Surely it cannot be that there is a mere two universities who offer a course on Germanic studies, 3 who do any form of Scandinavian studies, 1 who does Scottish studies, 7 who do Celtic studies ... comparing to 16 who do Hispanic studies and 9 who teach Arabic language (not to forget the 8 [9 before Aberdeen dropped it] who do Gender Studies a.k.a. Academic Feminism)?!

    Even Anthropology has been truncated to a mere ethnology course, including in fact any culture that is extra-NW-European. Even back home in Völkerkunde which would be the equivalent, you learn a great deal of indigenous culture alongside foreign culture.

    It just shows you once more where this country is going, and what the "intellectual elite" is supposed to know about...

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sigurd View Post
    Generally, indigenous and other (Celto-)Germanic culture needs more recognition in universities here in the UK.
    Very true. If I'm not mistaken, the Prussian dialect's resurgence had its roots in gaining such recognition.

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