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Thread: Philosophical Schools of Thought and Books That Most Influenced You?

  1. #121
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    For example..

    This of Hitler's..

    Adolf Hitler


    This of Nietzsche's..

    Would anyone care to learn something about the way in which ideals are manufactured? Does anyone have the nerve?…Well then, go ahead! There’s a chink through which you can peek into this murky shop. But wait just a moment, Mr. Foolhardy; your eyes must grow accustomed to the fickle light…all right, tell me what’s going on in there, audacious fellow; now I am the one who is listening.

    “I can’t see a thing, but I hear all the more. There’s a low, cautious whispering in every nook and corner. I have a notion these people are lying. All the sounds are sugary and soft. No doubt you were right; they are transmuting weakness into merit.”

    “Go on”

    “Impotence, which cannot retaliate, into kindness; pusillanimity into humility; submission before those one hates into obedience to One of whom they say that he has commanded this submission--they call him God. The inoffensiveness of the weak, his cowardice, his ineluctable standing and waiting at doors, are being given honorific titles such as patience; to be unable to avenge oneself is called to be unwilling to avenge oneself--even forgiveness (“for they know not what they do--we alone know what they do.”)
    Also there’s some talk of loving one’s enemy--accompanied by much sweat.”

    “Go on”

    “I’m sure they are quite miserable, all these whisperers and smalltime counterfeiters, even thought they huddle close together for warmth. But they tell me that this very misery is the sign of their election by God, that one beats the dogs one loves best, that this misery is perhaps also a preparation, a test, a kind of training, perhaps even more than that: something for which eventually they will be compensated with tremendous interest--in gold? No, in happiness. They call this bliss.”

    “Go on”

    “Now they tell me that not only are they better than the mighty of this earth, whose spittle they must lick ( not from fear--by no means--but because God commands us to honor our superiors), but they are even better off, or at least they will be better off someday. But I’ve had all I can stand. The smell is too much for me. This shop where they manufacture ideals seems to me to stink of lies.”

    “But just a moment. You haven’t told me anything about the greatest feat of these black magicians, who precipitate the white milk of loving-kindness out of every kind of blackness. Haven’t you noticed their most consummate sleight of hand, their boldest, finest, most brilliant trick? Just watch! These vermin, full of vindictive hatred, what are they brewing out of their of poisons? Have you ever heard vengeance and hatred mentioned? Would you ever guess, if you only listened to their words, that these are men bursting with hatred?”

    “I see what you mean. I’ll open my ears again--and stop my nose. Now I can make out what they seem to have been saying all along ‘We, the good ones, are also the just ones.’ They call the thing they seek not retribution but the triumph of justice; the thing they hate is not their enemy, by no means--they hate injustice, ungodliness; the thing they hope for and believe in is not vengeance, the sweet exultation of vengeance (‘sweeter than honey’ as Homer said) but ‘the triumph of God’ who is just, over the godless’; what remains to them to love on this earth is not their brothers in hatred, but what they call their ‘brother in love’-- all who are good and just.”

    “And what do they call that which comforts them in all their suffering--their phantasmagoria of future bliss?”

    “Do I hear correctly? They call it Judgment Day, the coming of their kingdom, the ‘Kingdom of God.’ Meanwhile they live in ‘faith,’ in ‘love,’ in ‘hope.’”

    “Stop! I’ve heard enough.”

    From The Birth of Tragedy & the Genealogy of Morals translated my Francis Golffing..pages 180-182
    And This of Campbell's..

    ...We must constantly die one way or another to the selfhood already achieved.

    MOYERS: Do you have a story that illustrates this?

    CAMPBELL: Well, the old English tale of Sir Gawain and the Green Knight is a famous one. One day a green giant came riding on a great green horse into King Arthur's dining hall. "I challenge anyone here," he cried, "to take this great battle-ax that I carry and cut off my head, and then, one year from today, meet me at the Green Chapel, where I shall cut off his head."
    The only knight in the hall who had the courage to accept this incongruous invitation was Gawain. He arose from the table, the Green Knight got off his horse, handed Gawain the ax, stuck out his neck, and Gawain with a single stroke chopped off his head. The Green Knight stood up, picked up his head, took back the ax, climbed onto his horse, and as he rode away called back to the astonished Gawain, "I'll see you in a year."
    That year everybody was very kind to Gawain. A fortnight or so before the term of the adventure, he rode off to search for the Green Chapel and keep faith with the giant Green Knight. As the date approached, with about three days to go, Gawain found himself before a hunter's cabin, where he asked the way to the Green Chapel. The hunter, a pleasant, genial fellow, met him at the door and replied, "Well, the Chapel is just down the way, a few hundred yards. Why not spend your next three days here with us? We'd love to have you. And when your time comes, your green friend is just down the way."
    So Gawain says okay. And the hunter that evening says to him, "Now, early tomorrow I'm going off hunting, but I'll be back in the evening, when we shall exchange our winnings of the day. I'll give you everything I get on the hunt, and you give me whatever will have come to you." They laugh, and that was fine with Gawain. So they all retire to bed.
    In the morning, early, the hunter rides off while Gawain is still asleep. Presently, in comes the hunter's extraordinarily beautiful wife, who tickles Gawain under the chin, and wakes him, and passionately invites him to a morning of love. Well, he is a knight of King Arthur's court, and to betray his host is the last thing such a knight can stoop to, so Gawain sternly resists. However, she is insistent and makes more and more of an issue of this thing, until finally she says to him, "Well then, let me give you just one kiss!" So she gives him one large smack. And that was that.
    That evening, the hunter arrives with a great haul of all kinds of small game, throws it on the floor, and Gawain gives him one large kiss. They laugh, and that, too, was that.
    The second morning, the wife again comes into the room, more passionate than ever, and the fruit of that encounter is two kisses. The hunter in the evening returns with about half as much game as before and receives two kisses, and again they laugh.
    On the third morning, the wife is glorious, and Gawain, a young man about to meet his death, has all he can do to keep his head and retain his knightly honor, with this last gift before him of the luxury of life. This time, he accepts three kisses. And when she has delivered these, she begs him, as a token of her love, to accept her garter. "It is charmed," she says, "and will protect you against every danger." So Gawain accepts the garter.
    And when the hunter returns with just one silly, smelly fox, which he tosses onto the floor, he receives in exchange three kisses from Gawain -- but no garter.
    Do we not see what the tests are of this young knight Gawain? They are the same as the first two of Buddha. One is of desire, lust. The other is of the fear of death. Gawain had proved courage enough in just keeping his faith with this adventure. However, the garter was just one temptation too many.
    So when Gawain is approaching the Green Chapel, he hears the Green Knight there, whetting the great ax-whiff, whiff, whiff, whiff. Gawain arrives, and the giant simply says to him, "Stretch your neck out here on this block." Gawain does so, and the Green Knight lifts the ax, but then pauses. "No, stretch it out -- a little more," he says. Gawain does so, and again the giant elevates the great ax. "A little more," he says once again. Gawain does the best he can and then whiffff -- only giving Gawain's neck one little scratch. Then the Green Knight, who is in fact the hunter himself transfigured, explains, "That's for the garter."
    This, they say, is the origin legend of the order of the Knights of the Garter.

    MOYERS: And the moral of the story?

    CAMPBELL: The moral, I suppose, would be that the first requirements for a heroic career are the knightly virtues of loyalty, temperance, and courage. The loyalty in this case is of two degrees or commitments: first, to the chosen adventure, but then, also, to the ideals of the order of knighthood. Now, this second commitment seems to put Gawain's way in opposition to the way of the Buddha, who when ordered by the Lord of Duty to perform the social duties proper to his caste, simply ignored the command, and that night achieved illumination as well as release from rebirth. Gawain is a European and, like Odysseus, who remained true to the earth and returned from the Island of the Sun to his marriage with Penelope, he has accepted, as the commitment of his life, not release from but loyalty to the values of life in this world. And yet, as we have just seen, whether following the middle way of the Buddha or the middle way of Gawain, the passage to fulfillment lies between the perils of desire and fear.
    A third position, closer than Gawain's to that of the Buddha, yet loyal still to the values of life on this earth, is that of Nietzsche, in Thus Spake Zarathustra. In a kind of parable, Nietzsche describes what he calls the three transformations of the spirit. The first is that of the camel, of childhood and youth. The camel gets down on his knees and says, "Put a load on me." This is the season for obedience, receiving instruction and the information your society requires of you in order to live a responsible life.
    But when the camel is well loaded, it struggles to its feet and runs out into the desert, where it is transformed into a lion -- the heavier the load that had been carried, the stronger the lion will be. Now, the task of the lion is to kill a dragon, and the name of the dragon is "Thou shalt." On every scale of this scaly beast, a "thou shalt" is imprinted: some from four thousand years ago; others from this morning's headlines. Whereas the camel, the child, had to submit to the "thou shalts," the lion, the youth, is to throw them off and come to his own realization.
    And so, when the dragon is thoroughly dead, with all its "thou shalts" overcome, the lion is transformed into a child moving out of its own nature, like a wheel impelled from its own hub. No more rules to obey. No more rules derived from the historical needs and tasks of the local society, but the pure impulse to living of a life in flower.

    The Power of Myth, Pages 188-191
    Later,
    -Lyfing

  2. #122
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scear View Post
    Unless you read MK in the original German, I find that it often comes across as so much gibberish.

    .Scear
    I struggle with German (I should get lessons) so I have no choice to read it in English, I find it makes perfect sense though.

  3. #123
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    Quote Originally Posted by Oski Von Skadi View Post
    My 4 kids are my biggest influence. Before they were born I was a nihilist and saw no reason to preserve anything whatsoever, not even myself. I was in the far-left mindset and everyone was an enemy and work seemed pointless and futile. My children's future is always on my mind now.

    I'm tired... ee20:
    Sleep will return!

    Mine, too. I have 3 - 2 teenagers and the youngest is nearly 11. The world is changing all the time, and their future is always in the forefront.

    I had many influences. People who have come and gone - and stayed - in my life, the music I listen to, the environment I live in (currently in the bush), but I think the most telling factor have always been the books I have read.

    When I was a child I read C.S. Lewis, history and myths have always been important to me. Celtic and Norse myths have given me an insatiable hunger to practise my Heathen path and learn more about my ancestors. Some of Burzum's literary works also struck a chord within me as well.

    I can't close this post, however, without mention of Tolkien - and of Lord of the Rings in particular.


    I was at a cross-roads in my life when I wanted to know more about spiritualism than what I was taught by the mainstream. I didn't fully understand what the books entailed at the time, but I believe that was the turning point to where I am now.
    Dick Dastardly: "MUTTLEY, DO SOMETHING!!!!"
    Muttley: "Hehehehehehehehehe"

    "And now, Harry, let us step out into the night and pursue that flighty temptress, adventure." - Albus Dumbledore, from Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince.

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    I think the biggest influence on our beliefs is truly our selves. We may get ideas from other sources and sure they leave an imprint on our souls, like my father, he always taught me things anyone would want and need to know. From gardening to how to make it through any struggle of life. My kids taught me what true happiness is, I see it in their eyes every morning. It leaves me wishing I could wake up so happy. My husband taught me to see the world through different eyes and how good Worcestershire sauce is.

    My own experiences tho, my own steps, brought me to where I am today. Now, we all just step together.
    "We've become a nation of strangers. There seems to be very little in common to bond us to our fellow Americans outside of our immediate families,some don't even have that to fall back on."

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    Houston Stewart Chamberlain
    “Providence has been pleased to give this one connected country to one united people, a people descended from the same ancestors, speaking the same language, professing the same religion, attached to the same principles of government, very similar in their manners and customs-Jon Jay, Federalist Papers

  6. #126
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    Well, there were many philosophies and books which influenced me in my life. Many I read, many I accepted and many I rejected again.

    In the end, it was mostly the Aristotle and the Neo-Scholastics, which formed my Weltanschauung and whats beyond the realm of the visible world.

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    Odin

    Nietzsche

    Jung

    Heraclitus

    Robert E Howard's Conan the Barbarian

    Thomas Jefferson

    Aristotle

    Socrates

    that is to name but a few. Most philosophy has at least something worth considering I suppose.

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    What has inspired my worldview more than anything else is my heritage as a Norwegian/Scandinavian, Germanic and European. This has alway been with me and spoken to me (I remember as a kid being very impressed by the Vikings, runes etc). I was not that politically/ideologically conscious until maybe 2009, though (although ecological awareness and some sort of instinctual contempt for the negative aspects of modernity has been with me for a longer time). But that was definitely my starting point.
    I think the later awakening when I intellectually reacted against multiculturalism, mass immigration, cultural-marxism and the decay of our culture simply had to come - it just needed the right triggers. My love for my heritage and roots were already there, and I've never been afraid of thinking out of the box and questioning conventional, mainstream "truths". Because of this, it just had to happen, it was a question of time...
    I've been inspired by a lot of different thinkers, sources etc, and I'm still discovering more, if not day by day, so at least regularly... I don't think I will come up with a list of persons or books here, since this would be quite limited, and wouldn't show the complete picture anyway.
    "Man evolved in cooperating groups united by common cultural and genetic ties, and it is only in such a setting that the individual can feel truly free, and truly protected. Men cannot live happily alone and without values or any sense of identity…" - Alain de Benoist
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ederico View Post
    I like the Will Durant book, I read the part on Nietzsche, I found it quite interesting.

    What is epistemology?
    Teaching about knowledge and the sources thereof. Knowledge as being justified belief. Schools of epistemology would be for example rationalism, empiricism, but other sources like intuition, revelation and tradition would also be thinkable. Interesting subject that strikes far further then knowledge as such, looking at human nature and the nature of being itself.

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