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Thread: Hvaml - The Sayings of Hr

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    Hvaml


    Hvaml
    The Words of Odin the High One

    Wisdom for Wanderers and Counsel to Guests

    1.
    At every door-way,
    ere one enters,
    one should spy round,
    one should pry round
    for uncertain is the witting
    that there be no foeman sitting,
    within, before one on the floor

    2.
    Hail, ye Givers! a guest is come;
    say! where shall he sit within?
    Much pressed is he who fain on the hearth
    would seek for warmth and weal.

    3.
    He hath need of fire, who now is come,
    numbed with cold to the knee;
    food and clothing the wanderer craves
    who has fared o'er the rimy fell.

    4.
    He craves for water, who comes for refreshment,
    drying and friendly bidding,
    marks of good will, fair fame if 'tis won,
    and welcome once and again.

    5.
    He hath need of his wits who wanders wide,
    aught simple will serve at home;
    but a gazing-stock is the fool who sits
    mid the wise, and nothing knows.

    6.
    Let no man glory in the greatness of his mind,
    but rather keep watch o'er his wits.
    Cautious and silent let him enter a dwelling;
    to the heedful comes seldom harm,
    for none can find a more faithful friend
    than the wealth of mother wit.

    7.
    Let the wary stranger who seeks refreshment
    keep silent with sharpened hearing;
    with his ears let him listen, and look with his eyes;
    thus each wise man spies out the way.

    8.
    Happy is he who wins for himself
    fair fame and kindly words;
    but uneasy is that which a man doth own
    while it lies in another's breast.

    9.
    Happy is he who hath in himself
    praise and wisdom in life;
    for oft doth a man ill counsel get
    when 'tis born in another's breast.

    10.
    A better burden can no man bear
    on the way than his mother wit;
    'tis the refuge of the poor, and richer it seems
    than wealth in a world untried.

    11.
    A better burden can no man bear
    on the way than his mother wit:
    and no worse provision can he carry with him
    than too deep a draught of ale.

    12.
    Less good than they say for the sons of men
    is the drinking oft of ale:
    for the more they drink, the less can they think
    and keep a watch o'er their wits.

    13.
    A bird of Unmindfulness flutters o'er ale feasts,
    wiling away men's wits:
    with the feathers of that fowl I was fettered once
    in the garths of Gunnlos below.

    14.
    Drunk was I then, I was over drunk
    in that crafty Jtun's court.
    But best is an ale feast when man is able
    to call back his wits at once.

    15.
    Silent and thoughtful and bold in strife
    the prince's bairn should be.
    Joyous and generous let each man show him
    until he shall suffer death.

    16.
    A coward believes he will ever live
    if he keep him safe from strife:
    but old age leaves him not long in peace
    though spears may spare his life.

    17.
    A fool will gape when he goes to a friend,
    and mumble only, or mope;
    but pass him the ale cup and all in a moment
    the mind of that man is shown.

    18.
    He knows alone who has wandered wide,
    and far has fared on the way,
    what manner of mind a man doth own
    who is wise of head and heart.

    19.
    Keep not the mead cup but drink thy measure;
    speak needful words or none:
    none shall upbraid thee for lack of breeding
    if soon thou seek'st thy rest.

    20.
    A greedy man, if he be not mindful,
    eats to his own life's hurt:
    oft the belly of the fool will bring him to scorn
    when he seeks the circle of the wise.

    21.
    Herds know the hour of their going home
    and turn them again from the grass;
    but never is found a foolish man
    who knows the measure of his maw.

    22.
    The miserable man and evil minded
    makes of all things mockery,
    and knows not that which he best should know,
    that he is not free from faults.

    23.
    The unwise man is awake all night,
    and ponders everything over;
    when morning comes he is weary in mind,
    and all is a burden as ever.

    24.
    The unwise man weens all who smile
    and flatter him are his friends,
    nor notes how oft they speak him ill
    when he sits in the circle of the wise.

    25.
    The unwise man weens all who smile
    and flatter him are his friends;
    but when he shall come into court he shall find
    there are few to defend his cause.

    26.
    The unwise man thinks all to know,
    while he sits in a sheltered nook;
    but he knows not one thing, what he shall answer,
    if men shall put him to proof.

    27.
    For the unwise man 'tis best to be mute
    when he come amid the crowd,
    for none is aware of his lack of wit
    if he wastes not too many words;
    for he who lacks wit shall never learn
    though his words flow ne'er so fast.

    28.
    Wise he is deemed who can question well,
    and also answer back:
    the sons of men can no secret make
    of the tidings told in their midst.

    29.
    Too many unstable words are spoken
    by him who ne'er holds his peace;
    the hasty tongue sings its own mishap
    if it be not bridled in.

    30.
    Let no man be held as a laughing-stock,
    though he come as guest for a meal:
    wise enough seem many while they sit dry-skinned
    and are not put to proof.

    31.
    A guest thinks him witty who mocks at a guest
    and runs from his wrath away;
    but none can be sure who jests at a meal
    that he makes not fun among foes.

    32.
    Oft, though their hearts lean towards one another,
    friends are divided at table;
    ever the source of strife 'twill be,
    that guest will anger guest.

    33.
    A man should take always his meals betimes
    unless he visit a friend,
    or he sits and mopes, and half famished seems,
    and can ask or answer nought.

    34.
    Long is the round to a false friend leading,
    e'en if he dwell on the way:
    but though far off fared, to a faithful friend
    straight are the roads and short.

    35.
    A guest must depart again on his way,
    nor stay in the same place ever;
    if he bide too long on another's bench
    the loved one soon becomes loathed.

    36.
    One's own house is best, though small it may be;
    each man is master at home;
    though he have but two goats and a bark-thatched hut
    'tis better than craving a boon.

    37.
    One's own house is best, though small it may be,
    each man is master at home;
    with a bleeding heart will he beg, who must,
    his meat at every meal.

    38.
    Let a man never stir on his road a step
    without his weapons of war;
    for unsure is the knowing when need shall arise
    of a spear on the way without.

    39.
    I found none so noble or free with his food,
    who was not gladdened with a gift,
    nor one who gave of his gifts such store
    but he loved reward, could he win it.

    40.
    Let no man stint him and suffer need
    of the wealth he has won in life;
    oft is saved for a foe what was meant for a friend,
    and much goes worse than one weens.

    41.
    With raiment and arms shall friends gladden each other,
    so has one proved oneself;
    for friends last longest, if fate be fair
    who give and give again.

    42.
    To his friend a man should bear him as friend,
    and gift for gift bestow,
    laughter for laughter let him exchange,
    but leasing pay for a lie.

    43.
    To his friend a man should bear him as friend,
    to him and a friend of his;
    but let him beware that he be not the friend
    of one who is friend to his foe.

    44.
    Hast thou a friend whom thou trustest well,
    from whom thou cravest good?
    Share thy mind with him, gifts exchange with him,
    fare to find him oft.

    45.
    But hast thou one whom thou trustest ill
    yet from whom thou cravest good?
    Thou shalt speak him fair, but falsely think,
    and leasing pay for a lie.

    46.
    Yet further of him whom thou trusted ill,
    and whose mind thou dost misdoubt;
    thou shalt laugh with him but withhold thy thought,
    for gift with like gift should be paid.

    47.
    Young was I once, I walked alone,
    and bewildered seemed in the way;
    then I found me another and rich I thought me,
    for man is the joy of man.

    48.
    Most blest is he who lives free and bold
    and nurses never a grief,
    for the fearful man is dismayed by aught,
    and the mean one mourns over giving.

    49.
    My garments once I gave in the field
    to two land-marks made as men;
    heroes they seemed when once they were clothed;
    'tis the naked who suffer shame!

    50.
    The pine tree wastes which is perched on the hill,
    nor bark nor needles shelter it;
    such is the man whom none doth love;
    for what should he longer live?

    51.
    Fiercer than fire among ill friends
    for five days love will burn;
    bun anon 'tis quenched, when the sixth day comes,
    and all friendship soon is spoiled.

    52.
    Not great things alone must one give to another,
    praise oft is earned for nought;
    with half a loaf and a tilted bowl
    I have found me many a friend.

    53.
    Little the sand if little the seas,
    little are minds of men,
    for ne'er in the world were all equally wise,
    'tis shared by the fools and the sage.

    54.
    Wise in measure let each man be;
    but let him not wax too wise;
    for never the happiest of men is he
    who knows much of many things.

    55.
    Wise in measure should each man be;
    but let him not wax too wise;
    seldom a heart will sing with joy
    if the owner be all too wise.

    56.
    Wise in measure should each man be,
    but ne'er let him wax too wise:
    who looks not forward to learn his fate
    unburdened heart will bear.

    57.
    Brand kindles from brand until it be burned,
    spark is kindled from spark,
    man unfolds him by speech with man,
    but grows over secret through silence.

    58.
    He must rise betimes who fain of another
    or life or wealth would win;
    scarce falls the prey to sleeping wolves,
    or to slumberers victory in strife.

    59.
    He must rise betimes who hath few to serve him,
    and see to his work himself;
    who sleeps at morning is hindered much,
    to the keen is wealth half-won.

    60.
    Of dry logs saved and roof-bark stored
    a man can know the measure,
    of fire-wood too which should last him out
    quarter and half years to come.

    61.
    Fed and washed should one ride to court
    though in garments none too new;
    thou shalt not shame thee for shoes or breeks,
    nor yet for a sorry steed.

    62.
    Like an eagle swooping over old ocean,
    snatching after his prey,
    so comes a man into court who finds
    there are few to defend his cause.

    63.
    Each man who is wise and would wise be called
    must ask and answer aright.
    Let one know thy secret, but never a second, --
    if three a thousand shall know.

    64.
    A wise counselled man will be mild in bearing
    and use his might in measure,
    lest when he come his fierce foes among
    he find others fiercer than he.

    65.
    Each man should be watchful and wary in speech,
    and slow to put faith in a friend.
    for the words which one to another speaks
    he may win reward of ill.

    66.
    At many a feast I was far too late,
    and much too soon at some;
    drunk was the ale or yet unserved:
    never hits he the joint who is hated.

    67.
    Here and there to a home I had haply been asked
    had I needed no meat at my meals,
    or were two hams left hanging in the house of that friend
    where I had partaken of one.

    68.
    Most dear is fire to the sons of men,
    most sweet the sight of the sun;
    good is health if one can but keep it,
    and to live a life without shame.

    69.
    Not reft of all is he who is ill,
    for some are blest in their bairns,
    some in their kin and some in their wealth,
    and some in working well.

    70.
    More blest are the living than the lifeless,
    'tis the living who come by the cow;
    I saw the hearth-fire burn in the rich man's hall
    and himself lying dead at the door.

    71.
    The lame can ride horse, the handless drive cattle,
    the deaf one can fight and prevail,
    'tis happier for the blind than for him on the bale-fire,
    but no man hath care for a corpse.

    72.
    Best have a son though he be late born
    and before him the father be dead:
    seldom are stones on the wayside raised
    save by kinsmen to kinsmen.

    73.
    Two are hosts against one, the tongue is the head's bane,
    'neath a rough hide a hand may be hid;
    he is glad at nightfall who knows of his lodging,
    short is the ship's berth,
    and changeful the autumn night,
    much veers the wind ere the fifth day
    and blows round yet more in a month.

    74.
    He that learns nought will never know
    how one is the fool of another,
    for if one be rich another is poor
    and for that should bear no blame.

    75.
    Cattle die and kinsmen die,
    thyself too soon must die,
    but one thing never, I ween, will die, --
    fair fame of one who has earned.

    76.
    Cattle die and kinsmen die,
    thyself too soon must die,
    but one thing never, I ween, will die, --
    the doom on each one dead.

    77.
    Full-stocked folds had the Fatling's sons,
    who bear now a beggar's staff:
    brief is wealth, as the winking of an eye,
    most faithless ever of friends.

    78.
    If haply a fool should find for himself
    wealth or a woman's love,
    pride waxes in him but wisdom never
    and onward he fares in his folly.

    79.
    All will prove true that thou askest of runes --
    those that are come from the gods,
    which the high Powers wrought, and which Odin painted:
    then silence is surely best.

    Maxims for All Men

    80.
    Praise day at even, a wife when dead,
    a weapon when tried, a maid when married,
    ice when 'tis crossed, and ale when 'tis drunk.

    81.
    Hew wood in wind, sail the seas in a breeze,
    woo a maid in the dark, -- for day's eyes are many, --
    work a ship for its gliding, a shield for its shelter,
    a sword for its striking, a maid for her kiss;

    82.
    Drink ale by the fire, but slide on the ice;
    buy a steed when 'tis lanky, a sword when 'tis rusty;
    feed thy horse neath a roof, and thy hound in the yard.

    83.
    The speech of a maiden should no man trust
    nor the words which a woman says;
    for their hearts were shaped on a whirling wheel
    and falsehood fixed in their breasts.

    84.
    Breaking bow, or flaring flame,
    ravening wolf, or croaking raven,
    routing swine, or rootless tree,
    waxing wave, or seething cauldron,

    85.
    flying arrows, or falling billow,
    ice of a nighttime, coiling adder,
    woman's bed-talk, or broken blade,
    play of bears or a prince's child,

    86.
    sickly calf or self-willed thrall,
    witch's flattery, new-slain foe,
    brother's slayer, though seen on the highway,
    half burned house, or horse too swift --
    be never so trustful as these to trust.

    87.
    Let none put faith in the first sown fruit
    nor yet in his son too soon;
    whim rules the child, and weather the field,
    each is open to chance.

    88.
    Like the love of women whose thoughts are lies
    is the driving un-roughshod o'er slippery ice
    of a two year old, ill-tamed and gay;
    or in a wild wind steering a helmless ship,
    or the lame catching reindeer in the rime-thawed fell.

    Lessons for Lovers

    89.
    Now plainly I speak, since both I have seen;
    unfaithful is man to maid;
    we speak them fairest when thoughts are falsest
    and wile the wisest of hearts.

    90.
    -- Let him speak soft words and offer wealth
    who longs for a woman's love,
    praise the shape of the shining maid --
    he wins who thus doth woo.

    91.
    -- Never a whit should one blame another
    whom love hath brought into bonds:
    oft a witching form will fetch the wise
    which holds not the heart of fools.

    92.
    Never a whit should one blame another
    for a folly which many befalls;
    the might of love makes sons of men
    into fools who once were wise.

    93.
    The mind knows alone what is nearest the heart
    and sees where the soul is turned:
    no sickness seems to the wise so sore
    as in nought to know content.

    Odin's Love Quests

    94.
    This once I felt when I sat without
    in the reeds, and looked for my love;
    body and soul of me was that sweet maiden
    yet never I won her as wife.

    95.
    Billing's daughter I found on her bed,
    fairer than sunlight sleeping,
    and the sweets of lordship seemed to me nought,
    save I lived with that lovely form.

    96.
    "Yet nearer evening come thou, Odin,
    if thou wilt woo a maiden:
    all were undone save two knew alone
    such a secret deed of shame."

    97.
    So away I turned from my wise intent,
    and deemed my joy assured,
    for all her liking and all her love
    I weened that I yet should win.

    98.
    When I came ere long the war troop bold
    were watching and waking all:
    with burning brands and torches borne
    they showed me my sorrowful way.

    99.
    Yet nearer morning I went, once more, --
    the housefolk slept in the hall,
    but soon I found a barking dog
    tied fast to that fair maid's couch.

    100.
    Many a sweet maid when one knows her mind
    is fickle found towards men:
    I proved it well when that prudent lass
    I sought to lead astray:
    shrewd maid, she sought me with every insult
    and I won therewith no wife.

    Odin's Quest after the Song Mead

    101.
    In thy home be joyous and generous to guests
    discreet shalt thou be in thy bearing,
    mindful and talkative, wouldst thou gain wisdom,
    oft making me mention of good.
    He is "Simpleton" named who has nought to say,
    for such is the fashion of fools.

    102.
    I sought that old Jtun, now safe am I back,
    little served my silence there;
    but whispering many soft speeches I won
    my desire in Suttung's halls.

    103.
    I bored me a road there with Rati's tusk
    and made room to pass through the rock;
    while the ways of the Jtuns stretched over and under,
    I dared my life for a draught.

    104.
    'Twas Gunnlod who gave me on a golden throne
    a draught of the glorious mead,
    but with poor reward did I pay her back
    for her true and troubled heart.

    105.
    In a wily disguise I worked my will;
    little is lacking to the wise,
    for the Soul-stirrer now, sweet Mead of Song,
    is brought to men's earthly abode.

    106.
    I misdoubt me if ever again I had come
    from the realms of the Jtun race,
    had I not served me of Gunnlod, sweet woman,
    her whom I held in mine arms.

    107.
    Came forth, next day, the dread Frost Giants,
    and entered the High One's Hall:
    they asked -- was the Baleworker back mid the Powers,
    or had Suttung slain him below?

    108.
    A ring-oath Odin I trow had taken --
    how shall one trust his troth?
    'twas he who stole the mead from Suttung,
    and Gunnlod caused to weep.

    The Counseling of the Stray-Singer

    109.
    'Tis time to speak from the Sage's Seat;
    hard by the Well of Weird
    I saw and was silent, I saw and pondered,
    I listened to the speech of men.

    110.
    Of runes they spoke, and the reading of runes
    was little withheld from their lips:
    at the High One's hall, in the High One's hall,
    I thus heard the High One say: --

    111.
    I counsel thee, Stray-Singer, accept my counsels,
    they will be thy boon if thou obey'st them,
    they will work thy weal if thou win'st them:
    rise never at nighttime, except thou art spying
    or seekest a spot without.

    112.
    I counsel thee, Stray-Singer, accept my counsels,
    they will be thy boon if thou obey'st them,
    they will work thy weal if thou win'st them:
    thou shalt never sleep in the arms of a sorceress,
    lest she should lock thy limbs;

    113.
    So shall she charm that thou shalt not heed
    the council, or words of the king,
    nor care for thy food, or the joys of mankind,
    but fall into sorrowful sleep.

    114.
    I counsel thee, Stray-Singer, accept my counsels,
    they will be thy boon if thou obey'st them,
    they will work thy weal if thou win'st them:
    seek not ever to draw to thyself
    in love-whispering another's wife.

    115.
    I counsel thee, Stray-Singer, accept my counsels,
    they will be thy boon if thou obey'st them,
    they will work thy weal if thou win'st them:
    should thou long to fare over fell and firth
    provide thee well with food.

    116.
    I counsel thee, Stray-Singer, accept my counsels,
    they will be thy boon if thou obey'st them,
    they will work thy weal if thou win'st them:
    tell not ever an evil man
    if misfortunes thee befall,
    from such ill friend thou needst never seek
    return for thy trustful mind.

    117.
    Wounded to death, have I seen a man
    by the words of an evil woman;
    a lying tongue had bereft him of life,
    and all without reason of right.

    118.
    I counsel thee, Stray-Singer, accept my counsels,
    they will be thy boon if thou obey'st them,
    they will work thy weal if thou win'st them:
    hast thou a friend whom thou trustest well,
    fare thou to find him oft;
    for with brushwood grows and with grasses high
    the path where no foot doth pass.

    119.
    I counsel thee, Stray-Singer, accept my counsels,
    they will be thy boon if thou obey'st them,
    they will work thy weal if thou win'st them:
    in sweet converse call the righteous to thy side,
    learn a healing song while thou livest.

    120.
    I counsel thee, Stray-Singer, accept my counsels,
    they will be thy boon if thou obey'st them,
    they will work thy weal if thou win'st them:
    be never the first with friend of thine
    to break the bond of fellowship;
    care shall gnaw thy heart if thou canst not tell
    all thy mind to another.

    121.
    I counsel thee, Stray-Singer, accept my counsels,
    they will be thy boon if thou obey'st them,
    they will work thy weal if thou win'st them:
    never in speech with a foolish knave
    shouldst thou waste a single word.

    122.
    From the lips of such thou needst not look
    for reward of thine own good will;
    but a righteous man by praise will render thee
    firm in favour and love.

    123.
    There is mingling in friendship when man can utter
    all his whole mind to another;
    there is nought so vile as a fickle tongue;
    no friend is he who but flatters.

    124.
    I counsel thee, Stray-Singer, accept my counsels,
    they will be thy boon if thou obey'st them,
    they will work thy weal if thou win'st them:
    oft the worst lays the best one low.

    125.
    I counsel thee, Stray-Singer, accept my counsels,
    they will be thy boon if thou obey'st them,
    they will work thy weal if thou win'st them:
    be not a shoemaker nor yet a shaft maker
    save for thyself alone:
    let the shoe be misshapen, or crooked the shaft,
    and a curse on thy head will be called.

    126.
    I counsel thee, Stray-Singer, accept my counsels,
    they will be thy boon if thou obey'st them,
    they will work thy weal if thou win'st them:
    when in peril thou seest thee, confess thee in peril,
    nor ever give peace to thy foes.

    127.
    I counsel thee, Stray-Singer, accept my counsels,
    they will be thy boon if thou obey'st them,
    they will work thy weal if thou win'st them:
    rejoice not ever at tidings of ill,
    but glad let thy soul be in good.

    128.
    I counsel thee, Stray-Singer, accept my counsels,
    they will be thy boon if thou obey'st them,
    they will work thy weal if thou win'st them:
    look not up in battle, when men are as beasts,
    lest the wights bewitch thee with spells.

    129.
    I counsel thee, Stray-Singer, accept my counsels,
    they will be thy boon if thou obey'st them,
    they will work thy weal if thou win'st them:
    wouldst thou win joy of a gentle maiden,
    and lure to whispering of love,
    thou shalt make fair promise, and let it be fast, --
    none will scorn their weal who can win it.

    130.
    I counsel thee, Stray-Singer, accept my counsels,
    they will be thy boon if thou obey'st them,
    they will work thy weal if thou win'st them:
    I pray thee be wary, yet not too wary,
    be wariest of all with ale,
    with another's wife, and a third thing eke,
    that knaves outwit thee never.

    131.
    I counsel thee, Stray-Singer, accept my counsels,
    they will be thy boon if thou obey'st them,
    they will work thy weal if thou win'st them:
    hold not in scorn, nor mock in thy halls
    a guest or wandering wight.

    132.
    They know but unsurely who sit within
    what manner of man is come:
    none is found so good, but some fault attends him,
    or so ill but he serves for somewhat.

    133.
    I counsel thee, Stray-Singer, accept my counsels,
    they will be thy boon if thou obey'st them,
    they will work thy weal if thou win'st them:
    hold never in scorn the hoary singer;
    oft the counsel of the old is good;
    come words of wisdom from the withered lips
    of him left to hang among hides,
    to rock with the rennets
    and swing with the skins.

    134.
    I counsel thee, Stray-Singer, accept my counsels,
    they will be thy boon if thou obey'st them,
    they will work thy weal if thou win'st them:
    growl not at guests, nor drive them from the gate
    but show thyself gentle to the poor.

    135.
    Mighty is the bar to be moved away
    for the entering in of all.
    Shower thy wealth, or men shall wish thee
    every ill in thy limbs.

    136.
    I counsel thee, Stray-Singer, accept my counsels,
    they will be thy boon if thou obey'st them,
    they will work thy weal if thou win'st them:
    when ale thou quaffest, call upon earth's might --
    'tis earth drinks in the floods.
    Earth prevails o'er drink, but fire o'er sickness,
    the oak o'er binding, the earcorn o'er witchcraft,
    the rye spur o'er rupture, the moon o'er rages,
    herb o'er cattle plagues, runes o'er harm.

    Odin's Quest after the Runes

    137.
    I trow I hung on that windy Tree
    nine whole days and nights,
    stabbed with a spear, offered to Odin,
    myself to mine own self given,
    high on that Tree of which none hath heard
    from what roots it rises to heaven.

    138.
    None refreshed me ever with food or drink,
    I peered right down in the deep;
    crying aloud I lifted the Runes
    then back I fell from thence.

    139.
    Nine mighty songs I learned from the great
    son of Bale-thorn, Bestla's sire;
    I drank a measure of the wondrous Mead,
    with the Soulstirrer's drops I was showered.

    140.
    Ere long I bare fruit, and throve full well,
    I grew and waxed in wisdom;
    word following word, I found me words,
    deed following deed, I wrought deeds.

    141.
    Hidden Runes shalt thou seek and interpreted signs,
    many symbols of might and power,
    by the great Singer painted, by the high Powers fashioned,
    graved by the Utterer of gods.

    142.
    For gods graved Odin, for elves graved Dan,
    Dvalin the Dallier for dwarfs,
    All-wise for Jtuns, and I, of myself,
    graved some for the sons of men.

    143.
    Dost know how to write, dost know how to read,
    dost know how to paint, dost know how to prove,
    dost know how to ask, dost know how to offer,
    dost know how to send, dost know how to spend?

    144.
    Better ask for too little than offer too much,
    like the gift should be the boon;
    better not to send than to overspend.
    ........
    Thus Odin graved ere the world began;
    Then he rose from the deep, and came again.

    The Song of Spells

    145.
    Those songs I know, which nor sons of men
    nor queen in a king's court knows;
    the first is Help which will bring thee help
    in all woes and in sorrow and strife.

    146.
    A second I know, which the son of men
    must sing, who would heal the sick.

    147.
    A third I know: if sore need should come
    of a spell to stay my foes;
    when I sing that song, which shall blunt their swords,
    nor their weapons nor staves can wound.

    148.
    A fourth I know: if men make fast
    in chains the joints of my limbs,
    when I sing that song which shall set me free,
    spring the fetters from hands and feet.

    149.
    A fifth I know: when I see, by foes shot,
    speeding a shaft through the host,
    flies it never so strongly I still can stay it,
    if I get but a glimpse of its flight.

    150.
    A sixth I know: when some thane would harm me
    in runes on a moist tree's root,
    on his head alone shall light the ills
    of the curse that he called upon mine.

    151.
    A seventh I know: if I see a hall
    high o'er the bench-mates blazing,
    flame it ne'er so fiercely I still can save it, --
    I know how to sing that song.

    152.
    An eighth I know: which all can sing
    for their weal if they learn it well;
    where hate shall wax 'mid the warrior sons,
    I can calm it soon with that song.

    153.
    A ninth I know: when need befalls me
    to save my vessel afloat,
    I hush the wind on the stormy wave,
    and soothe all the sea to rest.

    154.
    A tenth I know: when at night the witches
    ride and sport in the air,
    such spells I weave that they wander home
    out of skins and wits bewildered.

    155.
    An eleventh I know: if haply I lead
    my old comrades out to war,
    I sing 'neath the shields, and they fare forth mightily
    safe into battle,
    safe out of battle,
    and safe return from the strife.

    156.
    A twelfth I know: if I see in a tree
    a corpse from a halter hanging,
    such spells I write, and paint in runes,
    that the being descends and speaks.

    157.
    A thirteenth I know: if the new-born son
    of a warrior I sprinkle with water,
    that youth will not fail when he fares to war,
    never slain shall he bow before sword.

    158.
    A fourteenth I know: if I needs must number
    the Powers to the people of men,
    I know all the nature of gods and of elves
    which none can know untaught.

    159.
    A fifteenth I know, which Folk-stirrer sang,
    the dwarf, at the gates of Dawn;
    he sang strength to the gods, and skill to the elves,
    and wisdom to Odin who utters.

    160.
    A sixteenth I know: when all sweetness and love
    I would win from some artful wench,
    her heart I turn, and the whole mind change
    of that fair-armed lady I love.

    161.
    A seventeenth I know: so that e'en the shy maiden
    is slow to shun my love.

    162.
    These songs, Stray-Singer, which man's son knows not,
    long shalt thou lack in life,
    though thy weal if thou win'st them, thy boon if thou obey'st them
    thy good if haply thou gain'st them.

    163.
    An eighteenth I know: which I ne'er shall tell
    to maiden or wife of man
    save alone to my sister, or haply to her
    who folds me fast in her arms;
    most safe are secrets known to but one-
    the songs are sung to an end.

    164.
    Now the sayings of the High One are uttered in the hall
    for the weal of men, for the woe of Jtuns,
    Hail, thou who hast spoken! Hail, thou that knowest!
    Hail, ye that have hearkened! Use, thou who hast learned!





    Translated by Olive Bray
    Lk brn leika best.

  2. #2
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    In Danish/p dansk.

    Hvaml , Den Hjes Tale.

    1.
    Naar frem du vil g,
    skal frst Du spejde
    ved alle Dre,
    ved hver en Udgang,
    thi uvist er at vide,
    hvor Uvenner sidde
    hos ved Hus.

    2.
    Hil de Givende!
    En Gst er kommen ind.
    Hvor skal han sidde?
    Hast har dn,
    som for Dr
    skal friste sin Lykkes Lune.

    3.
    Ild behver
    den, som ind er kommen
    og er kold paa Kn.
    Til Mad og Klder
    trnger den Mand,
    som har faret vide paa Fjld.

    4.
    Vand behver den,
    som til Davre kommer,
    Hndklde, Hilsen
    og venligt Sind,
    om han kan det vinde,
    Ord og hfligt re.

    5.
    Til Vid trnger,
    hvo vide flakker;
    hjemme er Alting let.
    jnene vendes mod den
    som intet kan
    og sidder blandt snilde.

    6.
    Af sin rdsnare Klgt
    skal ingen sig rose,
    heller vre forsigtig i Sind.
    Naar tavs og klog Mand
    til Hjemsgrd kommer,
    sker ham intet ondt,
    thi ypperligere Ven
    har Mand aldrig
    end meget Mandevid.

    7.
    Forsigtig Gst
    som til Mltid gr,
    tier hel tavs,
    lytter med ren,
    skuer med jne;
    sdan spejder den snilde.

    8.
    Den er sl,
    som vd at vinde
    Lov og liflig Tale.
    Ej vindes det let,
    som Mand skal eje
    i andens Bryst.

    9.
    Den er sl,
    som selv har Vid
    og Lov, medens han lever,
    thi ilde Rd
    faar man ofte
    af andens Bryst.

    10.
    Bedre Byrde
    brer ej Mand paa Vej
    end meget Mandevid.
    Bedre end Formue
    det tykkes paa fremmed Sted.
    Det er den Fattiges Frelse.

    11.
    Bedre Byrde
    brer ej Mand paa Vej
    end meget Mandevid.
    Vrre Rejsekost
    brer ej Vandrer paa Vej
    end idel ldrikken.

    12.
    Ej er l s godt,
    som det agtes at vre,
    fr Slgternes Snner;
    jo mr man drikker,
    des mindre man vd
    til Sind og Sandser.

    13.
    Glemsels Hejre det er,
    som svver over l;
    den stjler Mndenes Sind.
    Med den Fugls Fjedre
    blev jeg fngslet
    i Gunlds Gaard.

    14.
    Drukken jeg blev,
    altfor drukken
    hos den vise Fjalar.
    Bedst er ved l,
    at atter man fr
    Sind og Sandser tilbage.

    15.
    Tavs og sindig
    vre Fyrstens Sn
    og kk i kamp.
    Glad og frejdig
    skal hver Mand findes
    indtil Ddens Dag.

    16.
    Ukk Mand
    tror evig at leve
    nr han flygter for Fare.
    lde giver ham
    aldrig Fred,
    om end Spyd ham den sknker.

    17.
    Tben glor,
    nr han kommer som Gst,
    mumler i Skg og skuler.
    Men aldrig ssnart
    han faar sig en Slurk,
    ses alt, hvad der bor i hans Bryst.

    18.
    Ene dn vd,
    som vandrer vide
    og fr langt om Lande,
    hvilke Tanker
    hver Mand gemmer,
    som er snild i Sind.

    19.
    Ej skal man hnge ved Kruset,
    men drikke Mjd til Mde,
    tale tilpas eller tie.
    Ingen lgger dig
    dt til Last,
    at Du gr snart at sove.

    20.
    Grdig Mand,
    som Maal ej ndser,
    der sig Ulykker til.
    Ofte volder Maven,
    at Tben udls,
    nr han mdes med vise Mnd.

    21.
    Hjorde vide,
    nr hjem de skulle,
    og g da af Grs,
    men uvis Mand
    kender aldrig
    sin Maves Ml.

    22.
    Tosset Mand
    med tbeligt Sind
    ler ad Alting.
    Det vd han ikke,
    som han trngte at vide,
    at han ej er uden Lyde.

    23.
    Usnild Mand vger
    hver en Nat
    og ngstes for Alting.
    Da han er mdig,
    nr Morgenen kommer,
    og Sorgen er der end.

    24.
    Usnild Mand
    tror sig Ven med alle,
    som smile sdt.
    Ej han det sknner,
    om med Spot man ham laster,
    nr han sidder blandt snilde.

    25.
    Usnild Mand
    tror sig Ven med alle,
    som smile sdt,
    men han mrker,
    nr han mder paa Thinge,
    at f forsvare hans Sag.

    26.
    Usnild Mand
    tror alt at vide,
    naar han kan sig fjle i Fare
    Ikke han vd,
    hvad han skal sige,
    naar Fjender ham friste.

    27.
    Usnild Mand
    som mdes med andre,
    ham er det tjenligt at tie.
    Ingen vd
    at han intet kan,
    nr ikke han mler formeget.
    (Hvo intet vd,
    vd heller ej,
    om han mler formeget.)

    28.
    Vs tykkes sig den,
    som vd at sprge
    og s at svare.
    Ej kan Drskaben
    dlges af Mnd;
    saa vide den vandrer iblandt dem.

    29.
    Hvo aldrig tier,
    taler tilvisse
    ofte tbelige Ord.
    Den hurtige Tunge,
    som ikke tmmes,
    snakker sig ofte Ulykke til.

    30.
    Ej skal man skue
    med forskende je
    p den, der kommer som Gst.
    Ofte tykkes sig vs,
    hvo udspurgt bliver
    og fr sidde trskindet og tryg.

    31.
    Vs tykkes sig den,
    som flygter sin Vej,
    nr han en Gst har gkket.
    En Dre er den Mand,
    som ved Mltid lr,
    om end Gsterne ere gramme i Hu.

    32.
    Ofte ere Mnd
    ejegode Venner
    og klamres dog ved Kruset.
    Altid sdan
    Trtte yppes,
    og Gst hidses mod Gst.

    33.
    Tidligt Mltid
    skal man ofte tage,
    naar ej man til Kendinger kommer;
    ellers man sidder
    og mber af Sult
    og er trg til at tale.

    34.
    Afsides bor
    Den onde Ven,
    om end ved Vejen han bygger,
    men til den gode Ven
    Genveje fre,
    om end langt borte han bor.

    35.
    G man skal;
    ej Gst skal man vre
    altid p det ene sted;
    kr bliver led,
    nr lnge han sidder
    i en andens Hus.

    36.
    Bo er bedst,
    sknt lidet det er;
    enhver er Herre hjemme.
    Om to Geder man har
    og en vidjetkt Hytte,
    det er dog bedre end Bn.

    37.
    Bo er bedst,
    sknt lidet det er;
    enhver er Herre hjemme.
    Blodigt er Hjertet,
    nr bede man skal
    om Mad til hvert Mltid.

    38.
    I Marken skal ingen
    Mand fra sine Vben
    en Fod g frem,
    thi uvist er at vide,
    om p Vej derude
    man vil savne sit Spyd.

    39.
    Ej fandt jeg s gavmild
    og gstfri Mand,
    at ej han blev glad ved Gave,
    eller s rundhndet
    med sin Rigdom,
    at ej mod Tak og Gengld han tog.

    40.
    Samler en Mand
    Skatte i Hus,
    da vide han dem vel at nytte.
    Ofte spares for Uven,
    hvad man undte sin Ven.
    Meget gr vrre, end det ventes.

    41.
    Med Vben og Klder
    skulle Venner glde hinanden,
    med det ypperste, de eje.
    De, som Gaver lnne,
    ere lngst Venner,
    nr alt vender sig vel.

    42.
    Ven af sin Ven
    skal en Mand vre
    og genglde Gave med Gave;
    Latter skal Mnd
    med Latter glde,
    ls Tale med Lgn.

    43.
    Ven af sin Ven
    skal en Mand vre
    - Af ham og hans Ven,
    men ingen Mand
    skal sin Uvens
    Vens Ven vre.

    44.
    Vd du - om du har en Ven,
    som vel du tror,
    og vil du godt af ham vinde,
    da skal du blande Sind med ham
    og skifte Gaver
    og ofte g til hans Grd.

    45.
    Men har du en anden,
    som du ilde tror,
    og vil du godt af ham vinde,
    da skal du fagert til ham tale
    men falsk tnke
    og glde ls Tale med Lgn.

    46.
    Endnu t om den,
    som du ilde tror,
    og p hvis Sind du ej stoler;
    le skal du med ham
    og listig tale;
    Ln vre Gave lig.

    47.
    Ung var jeg fordum;
    ene jeg rejste;
    da blev jeg vild p Vejen.
    Rig jeg mig tyktes,
    da en anden jeg traf.
    Mand er Mands Gammen.

    48.
    Milde, kkke
    Mnd leve bedst;
    sjlden Sorg de f.
    Men usnild Mand
    ngstes for alt;
    skvt til Gaver han ser.

    49.
    Klderne mine
    gav jeg paa Marken
    til tvende Trmnd.
    Helte de tyktes,
    da Skrud de havde.
    men man spotter den ngne Svend.

    50.
    Granen visner,
    som gror p Torpet;
    den varmes ej af Bark eller Blad.
    Slig er den Mand,
    som Mnd ej ynde.
    Hvi skal han lnge leve?

    51.
    Hedere en Ild
    brnder hos onde Venner
    Fred i fem Dage,
    men den slukkes,
    nr den sjette kommer,
    og alt er ude.

    52.
    Store Gaver
    skal ej man give;
    ofte fanger man Lov for lidet.
    Med en halv Lev
    og et hldende Bger
    fik jeg en Flle.

    53.
    Hvor der er lidet Sand,
    ere Serne smaa.
    Sm ere Mndendes Sind.
    Ej blev alle
    ns i Klgt.
    Der er Vismnd og Drer i Verden.

    54.
    Vs til Mde
    skal hver Mand vre;
    aldrig han vre for vs.
    De Mnd leve
    det fagreste Liv,
    som vide meget.

    55.
    Vs til Mde
    skal hver Mand vre;
    aldrig han vre for vs,
    thi vs Mands Sind
    bliver sjlden glad,
    nr altfor vs han er.

    56.
    Vs til Mde
    skal hver Mand vre;
    aldrig han vre for vs.
    Sin Skbne skal ingen
    forud skue;
    da har han sorgfriest Sind.

    57.
    Brand brnder af Brand,
    til brndt den er;
    Ild tndes af Ild.
    Mand ved Tale
    kendes af Mand,
    men Skumleren skuler.

    58.
    rle skal opst,
    hvo anden Mands
    Liv eller Ejendom nsker.
    Sjlden fr liggende
    Ulv sig et Lrben
    eller sovende Mand Sejr.

    59.
    rle skal opst,
    hvo der har Arbejdere f
    og g at se til sin Gerning.
    Meget forsinkes,
    hvo om Morgenen sover,
    Den halve Rigdom er Raskhed.

    60.
    Trre Planker
    og Bark til Tkning -
    om sligt vide Mnd Besked -,
    om hvormeget Brndsel
    der bruges i Bo
    til hver Tid og Time.

    61.
    Toet og Mt
    ride Mand til Thinge,
    om end han ej er smykket.
    Sine Sko og Broge
    skamme sig ingen ved,
    ej heller ved Hesten,
    om end den ikke er god.

    62.
    rnen hnger
    med Hoved og snapper,
    nr den ser den ldgamle S;
    s gr den Mand,
    som mdes med mange
    og har f til at tale for sig.

    63.
    Sprge og svare
    skal den snilde,
    som nsker at kaldes klog.
    Ene skal man vide, -
    ej med en anden;
    alle vide, hvad tre vide.

    64.
    Den snilde Mand
    forst at vise
    sin Magt til Mde;
    nr han kommer blandt kkke,
    let han kender,
    at ingen er raskest af alle.

    65.
    Forsigtig og p Vagt
    skal hver Mand vre,
    varsom til Venner at tro.
    For de Ord,
    som til en anden man sagde,
    ofte man Bod mtte bde.

    66.
    Meget for tidlig
    kom jeg p mangt et Sted
    og for sildig p somme.
    llet var drukket
    eller ikke lavet;
    ukr kommer aldrig tilpas.

    67.
    Hist og her
    blev til Hjem jeg buden,
    hvis ej Mad til Mltid var ndig,
    eller to Skinker hang
    hos min trofaste Ven,
    nr jeg n havde dt.

    68.
    Ild er det bedste
    for Menneskers Brn
    og Solens Skin,
    nr Helsen eg Helbred
    en Mand kan have
    og leve uden Last.

    69.
    Ej er man hlt elendig,
    fordi man Helsen ej har.
    Somme gldes ved Snner,
    somme ved Frnder,
    somme ved Rigdom.
    somme ved deres Dd.

    70.
    Bedre er det at leve
    end dd at ligge;
    kveger Mand fr sig vel Ko.
    Ild s jeg rase
    hos den rige Mand,
    men udenfor Dren var Dden.

    71.
    Halt rider p Hest,
    narmet driver Hjord,
    dv er dygtig i Kamp.
    Blind har det bedre
    end den, som er brndt.
    Et Lig er til liden Nytte.

    72.
    En Sn er bedre,
    om end sent han fdes,
    naar Faderens Liv er ledet.
    Sjlden Bavtastene
    ved Vejen st,
    nr ej Frnde dem rejser for Frnde.

    73.
    To ere i n Hr;
    Tunge er Hoveds Bane;
    i hver en Kjortel
    en Hnd jeg venter.

    74.
    Til Nat sig glder,
    hvo der har Rejsekost nok.
    Ustadig er Hstnatten.
    I fem Dage Vret
    ofte sig vender;
    end mer i en Mned.

    75.
    Ej vd den
    som intet vd,
    at mangen er en andens Abe.
    n Mand er rig,
    en anden fattig,
    men derfor br han ej dadles.

    76.
    Ejendom dr,
    Frnder d,
    selv man dr tilsidst.
    Eftermlet
    aldrig dr,
    nr det vel er vundet.

    77.
    Ejendom dr,
    Frnder d,
    selv man dr tilsidst.
    t jeg vd,
    som aldrig dr:
    Dom over hver en Dd

    78.
    Fulde Stalde
    saa jeg hos Fitjungs Snner;
    nu tog de til Tiggerstav.
    Ejendom er
    som jets Blink,
    den vankelmodigste Ven.

    79.
    Nr usnild Mand
    Ejendom vinder
    eller Kvindes Krlighed,
    da voxer hans Hovmod,
    men aldrig hans Vid;
    hans Drskab dygtig vil trives.

    80.
    Vil ret du ham prve,
    s sprg ham om Runer,
    som Guderne kende,
    som Guderne gjorde
    og Taleren tegned;
    Da tykkes det bedst, om han tier.

    81.
    Ved Kvld skal Dag du rose,
    Kone, nr hun er brndt,
    Glavind, nr det er prvet,
    M, nr hun er givet,
    Is, nr du er kommet over,
    l, nr det er drukket.

    82,
    I Vind skal Ved du hugge,
    i Vr ro p S,
    i Mrke med M tale -
    mange ere Dagens jne.
    Skib skal bruges til Fart
    og Skjold til Vrn,
    Klinge til Hug
    og M til at kysse.

    83.
    Ved Ild skal l man drikke
    og p Is skride,
    kbe mager Mr
    og rusten Klinge,
    fede Hesten hjemme
    og Hunden p Grden.

    84.
    Ms Ord
    skal Mand ej tro,
    ej heller hvad Kvinden kvder,
    thi p hvirvlende Hjul
    blev deres Hjerter skabte,
    og Vgelsind bor i deres Bryst.

    85.
    Bragene Bue,
    brndende Lue,
    gabende Ulv,
    galende Krage,
    gryntene Svin,
    rodls Gran,
    voksende Blge,
    boblende Kedel,

    86.
    flyvende Spyd,
    faldende Blge,
    n Nats Is,
    ringlagt Orm,
    Bruds Ord i Seng
    eller brustent Svrd,
    Bjrns Leg
    eller Konges Barn,

    87.
    syg Kalv,
    selvrdig Trl,
    Vlves Smiger,
    nyfldet Val,
    (klar Himmel,
    leende Herre,
    Hundehinken
    og Hores Grd,)

    88.
    tidlig st Ager
    skal ingen Mand tro,
    og ej for snart sin Sn.
    Vr rder for Ager
    og Vid for Snnen;
    tvivlsomt det er med de to.

    89.
    Sin Broders Bane,
    om p Vej man ham mder,
    halvbrndt Hus,
    hurtig Hest
    - Hest er unyttig
    nr n Fod er brudt -
    ej vre Mand s tryg,
    at han alt dette tror.

    90.
    S er Kvinders Fred,
    som at age p Glatis
    med uskrpet Hest,
    en munter tora,
    der ikke er tmmet,
    som i Storm at sejle
    i rorlst Skib,
    som nr en halt skal fange
    en Ren p det glatte Fjld.

    91.
    Nu vil Sandhed jeg kvde,
    thi jeg Knnene kender;
    ustadig er Mand mod M.
    Fagrest vi tale,
    nr falskest vi tnke;
    sligt drer de snildes Sind.

    92.
    Fagert skal man mle
    og meget byde,
    nr man Kvindes Elskov nsker,
    den lyde Ms
    Sknhed love;
    den fr, som frier.

    93.
    Ingen Mand
    dadle en anden,
    fordi Elskov han nsker.
    Ynde lokker
    ofte den vise,
    men Dren ndser den ej.

    94.
    Aldrig man dadle
    som Fejl hos en anden,
    hvad der hndes s mangen en Mand.
    Den mgtige Attr
    gr ofte til Tber
    de snilde blandt Mndenes Snner.

    95.
    Det vd kun sjlen,
    som ved Hjertet sidder -
    Sjl kender ene til Sindet;
    ingen Sot er vrre
    for den vise Mand
    end uden Lyst at leve.

    96.
    Sligt jeg prved,
    da i Siv jeg sad
    og efter min Elskov lngtes.
    Som eget Hjerte
    var mig den yndige M,
    og dog jeg end ej hende ejer.

    97.
    Billings solklare
    M jeg s
    i Sengen sove.
    Eneste Fryd
    for Fyrste det mig tyktes
    med den lyse M at leve.

    98.
    "Sent mod Aften
    skal, Odin! Du komme,
    nr med M Du vil mle.
    Helt ilde det er,
    nr ej ene to
    vide en sdan Synd."

    99.
    Bort jeg da gik,
    glad ved min Elskov,
    opgav den Vellyst, jeg vented.
    Vist jeg tnkte,
    at jeg vilde vinde
    al hendes Elskov og Tro.

    100.
    Da atter jeg kom,
    da vare alle
    de kkke Kmper vgne;
    brndende Lys
    og Fakler de bare;
    det var mig en vanskelig Vej.

    101.
    rle om Morgenen,
    da atter jeg var kommen,
    l Salfolket i Svn.
    da s jeg en Hund,
    som bunden stod
    ved den lyse Kvindes Leje.

    102.
    Fler end n M,
    nr ret du vil forske,
    er utro mod Elskere.
    Det jeg lrte,
    da den listige
    M jeg til Falskhed forfrte.
    Al mulig Spot
    mig voldte den snilde M,
    og ej jeg vandt hendes Elskov.

    103.
    Hjemme skal Mand vre glad
    og munter med sin Gst
    og flink i sin Frd,
    veltalende, meget vidende;
    om vs han vil vre,
    skal tidt om det gode han tale.
    En Erketbe hedder,
    hvo om intet kan tale.
    Derp kender man Dren.

    104.
    Den ldgamle Jtte jeg sgte;
    nu atter jeg vender tilbage.
    At tie var til ringe Tarv;
    mange Ord
    mlte jeg mig til Gavn
    i Suttungs Sale.

    105.
    Gunld mig gav
    paa den gyldne Stol
    en Drik af den dyre Mjd.
    Drlig Ln
    jeg lod hende have
    for hendes hulde Hu,
    for hendes heftige Elskov.

    106.
    Rates Mund
    arbejde mtte
    og Gruset gnave.
    Over og under
    gik Jtternes Veje;
    vel mtte jeg Livet vove.

    107.
    Vel vandt jeg Drikken,
    og vel jeg den nd;
    vis finder Vej til alt.
    Thi er Odrrer
    nu kommen op
    til Slgternes Hjem p Jorden.

    108.
    Endnu jeg tvivler,
    om atter jeg var kommen
    ud af Jtternes Hjem,
    hvis ej Gunld jeg nd,
    den gode Kvinde,
    hvis Arm mig favned i Elskov.

    109.
    Den flgende Dag
    Rimthurser fore
    at sprge nyt om den hje
    i den hjes Hal;
    om Blvrk de spurgte,
    om til Guders Bolig han var kommen,
    eller om Suttung havde ham slt.

    110.
    Sin Ed p Ringen
    har Odin indfrit.
    Hvor skal man tro p hans Troskab.
    Suttung han sveg
    for den dyre Drik
    og lod Gunld grde.

    111.
    Tid er det at tale
    paa Talerstol
    ved Urds Brnd.
    Jeg s, og jeg tav,
    jeg s, og jeg tnkte,
    jeg lytted til, hvad Mndende mlte.
    Om Runer jeg hrte dem tale
    og om Gudernes Rdslagning;
    ej tav de om Runers Ristning,
    ej tav de om Runers Rden
    i den hjes Hal.
    I den hjes Hal
    hrte jeg sige slunde:

    112.
    Jeg rder dig, Lodfavne!
    og Rd du tage;
    du nyder, om du nemmer;
    til dit Gavn jeg dem giver:
    St ej op om Natten,
    nr ej spejde du skal
    eller g ud i et rind.

    113.
    Jeg rder dig, Lodfavne!
    og Rd du tage;
    du nyder, om du nemmer;
    til dit Gavn jeg dem giver:
    Ej skal du sove
    i sejdkyndig
    Kvindes Favn,
    ej i hendes Arme hvile.

    114.
    Let hun volder,
    at lidet du agter
    Thing eller Fyrstes Tale.
    Ej du gldes ved Mad
    eller Mnds Gammen
    og gr sorgfuld at sove.

    115.
    Jeg rder dig, Lodfavne!
    og Rd du tage;
    du nyder, om du nemmer;
    til dit Gavn jeg dem giver:
    Aldrig du lokke
    en andens Hustru
    til lnlig Leflen.

    116.
    Jeg rder dig, Lodfavne!
    og Rd du tage;
    du nyder, om du nemmer;
    til dit Gavn jeg dem giver:
    Om p Fjld eller Fjord
    dig lyster at fare,
    s srg for Fde p Farten.

    117.
    Aldrig du lade
    den onde Mand
    dine Ulykker vide,
    thi af den onde Mand
    fr du aldrig
    Tak for din Tiltro.

    118.
    Jeg s den onde
    Kvindes Ord
    bide Manden tilblods;
    den falske Tunge
    voldte hans Fald,
    og ej var Beskyldningen sand.

    119.
    Vd du; om Ven du ejer,
    som vel du tror,
    sg da ofte hans Selskab,
    thi hjt Grs
    og Ris vil gro
    p den Vej, som ingen vandrer.

    120.
    Jeg rder dig, Lodfavne!
    og Rd du tage;
    du nyder, om du nemmer;
    til dit Gavn jeg dem giver:
    Lok den gode Mand
    til Gammenstale;
    lr vindende Ord, mens du lever.

    121.
    Aldrig du br
    vre frst til at bryde
    Venskab med din Ven.
    Sorg der dit Hjerte,
    nr ingen du kan
    betro dine Tanker.

    122.
    Jeg rder dig, Lodfavne!
    og Rd du tage;
    du nyder, om du nemmer;
    til dit Gavn jeg dem giver:
    Aldrig skal du
    skifte Ord
    med tbelige Tosser,

    123.
    thi af ond Mand
    kan du aldrig
    f Gengld for det gode,
    men den gode Mand
    kan dig gre
    afholdt af alle ved sin Ros.

    124.
    Der er Venskabet godt,
    hvor hver siger
    al sin Tanke til n.
    Alt er bedre
    end utro Venskab;
    ej er den Ven, som altid
    taler til Vilje.

    125.
    Jeg rder dig, Lodfavne!
    og Rd du tage;
    du nyder, om du nemmer;
    til dit Gavn jeg dem giver:
    Ej med trende Ord
    skal du trttes med den slettere Mand;
    ofte bier den bedre,
    nr den slettere slr.

    126.
    Kan Sko du lave
    og skfte Spyd,
    da srg frst for dig selv.
    Passer Skoen ilde,
    og er Skaftet skvt,
    da volder det dig Vnde.

    127.
    Jeg rder dig, Lodfavne!
    og Rd du tage;
    du nyder, om du nemmer;
    til dit Gavn jeg dem giver:
    Nr ondt du fornemmer,
    s tag det for ondt,
    og giv ej dine Fjender Fred.

    128.
    Jeg rder dig, Lodfavne!
    og Rd du tage;
    du nyder, om du nemmer;
    til dit Gavn jeg dem giver:
    Gld dig aldrig
    ved det onde,
    men gld dig ved det gode.

    129.
    Jeg rder dig, Lodfavne!
    og Rd du tage;
    du nyder, om du nemmer;
    til dit Gavn jeg dem giver:
    Ej i Kamp
    du op skal se
    - let til Svin
    blive Mndenes Snner -,
    at ej Troldom skal tage dit Mod.

    130.
    Agter du at tale
    med god Kvinde om Elskov
    og f Gammen deraf,
    da skal du godt love
    og Lftet holde;
    ej kedes man ved god Gave.

    131.
    Varsom byder jeg dig vre,
    men ej for varsom.
    Vogt dig mest for l
    og for anden Mands Hustru;
    vogt dig for det tredje
    for Tyves Rnker.

    132.
    Til Hn og Latter
    aldrig du have
    Gst eller gangende Mand.
    De, som inde sidde,
    vide ofte ej,
    af hvad Kr de ere, som komme.

    133.
    Lyder og Dyder
    bre de ddeliges Snner
    blandede i Bryst.
    Ingen er s god,
    at han ej har Lyde,
    eller s ussel, at til intet han duer.

    134.
    Ad den grhrdedes Ord
    skal du aldrig le;
    ofte er det godt, som de gamle sige.
    Ofte kommer af runken Mund
    klgtige Ord,
    om end han hnger med Ham
    og har rynket Hud
    og slentrer blandt Slaver.

    135.
    Jeg rder dig, Lodfavne!
    og Rd du tage;
    du nyder, om du nemmer;
    til dit Gavn jeg dem giver:
    Far ej op mod Gsten;
    jag ham ej p Dr.
    Yd de fattige Forsog,
    og alt godt vil de dig nske.

    136.
    Strk er den Stang,
    som svinge skal
    og bne Dren for alle:
    Men und dem en Gave,
    at ej dine Lemmer
    alt ondt de skal nske.

    137.
    Jeg rder dig, Lodfavne!
    og Rd du tage;
    du nyder, om du nemmer;
    til dit Gavn jeg dem giver:
    Hvor l du drikker,
    dr vlg dig Jordsmon,
    thi Jord virker mod Rus
    og Ild mod Sot,
    Eg til Affring,
    Ax mod Troldom
    og Hal mod Hustvist.
    Mod Harme skal man pkalde Mnen;
    Bider er god mod Bidsot,
    Runer mod ondt nske,
    og Vang skal drikke Vde.

    138.
    Jeg vd, at jeg hang
    i Vind p Tret
    hele ni Ntter,
    Sret af Spyd,
    sknket til Odin,
    selv til mig selv,
    oppe i Tret,
    hvorom ingen vd,
    af hvad Rod det sig rejser.

    139.
    Ej Brd de mig rakte,
    ej Horn de mig bd.
    Nedad jeg spejded
    og Runer jeg nemmed,
    rbende jeg nemmed;
    s faldt jeg ned.

    140.
    Ni mgtige Sange
    lrte jeg af den bermte Sn
    af Blthorn, Bestlas Fader,
    og en Drik jeg nd
    af den dyre Mjd,
    som af Odrrer stes.

    141.
    Da monne jeg vokse
    og vorde vs,
    tage til og trives.
    Ord frte fra Ord
    til andre Ord;
    Dd frte fra Dd
    til anden Dd.

    142.
    Runer vil du finde,
    tolkende Runer,
    hel store Stave,
    som den mgtige Taler tegned,
    som de hellige Guder gjorde
    og den ypperste As risted,

    143.
    Odin hos Aser
    og Din hos Alfer,
    Dvalin hos Dvrge,
    svid hos Jtter;
    selv risted jeg somme.

    144.
    Forstr du at Riste?
    Forstr du at rde?
    Forstr du at lre?
    Forstr du at prve?
    Forstr du at bede?
    Forstr du at blote?
    Forstr du at sende?
    Forstr du at de?

    145.
    Bedre ej at bede
    end formeget at offre.
    Altid vil Gave Gengld.
    Bedre ej at sende
    end formeget at de.
    S ristede Thund
    fr Slgternes Tider.
    Der rejste han sig op,
    hvorhen han atter kom.

    146.
    Jeg kender Sange,
    som Fyrstens Hustru ej kender
    og ingen Mands tling.
    n Hjlp der er;
    den kan dig hjlpe
    i Strid og Smerter
    og alle Sorger.

    147.
    Det kan jeg for det andet,
    som Mndenes Snner m kende,
    nr de vil leve som Lger.

    148.
    Det kan jeg for det tredje,
    nr jeg meget trnger
    at vrge mig mod vrede Fjender;
    jeg dver de skarpe
    Svrdes Egge;
    da bider ej Vben og Rnker.

    149.
    Det kan jeg for det fjerde,
    nr man fngsler
    mine Lemmer med Lnker;
    da galdrer jeg s,
    at bort jeg kan gange;
    da brister Fddernes Bnd,
    og ej Hndjernet holder.

    150.
    Det kan jeg for det femte:
    ser jeg den fjendtlige Pil
    i Fylkningen fare,
    s stdt den ej flyver,
    at jeg jo den standser,
    nr med mit Syn jeg den sr.

    151.
    Det kan jeg for det sjette:
    den Mand som mig srer
    med rdder af den vilde Vkst,
    og hver en Mand,
    som vkker min Harm,
    skal fange mer Men end jeg.

    152.
    Det kan jeg for det syvende:
    ser jeg om Mndene brnde
    den hje Hal,
    ej den brnder s vildt,
    at jeg jo kan bjerge.
    S kan jeg trylle med Sang.

    153.
    Det kan jeg for det ottende,
    som for alle
    er nyttigt at nemme;
    nr Had vokser
    mellem den vldiges Snner,
    kan jeg stille det straks.

    154.
    Det kan jeg for det niende,
    nr Nd mig tvinger
    at bjerge min Bd p Blge:
    Vinden jeg lgger
    da p Vove
    og stiller det hele Hav.

    155.
    Det kan jeg for det tiende,
    nr Troldtj jeg ser
    i luften lege:
    da jeg volder,
    at de vildsomme fare
    ud af deres Ham,
    ud af deres Hu.

    156.
    Det kan jeg for det ellevte,
    nr drage jeg skal
    med Venner til Valen:
    jeg synger under Skjolde,
    og strke de fare
    uskadte til Kamp,
    uskadte af Kamp;
    Altid vende de uskadte Hjem.

    157.
    Det kan jeg for det tolvte,
    nr jeg hjt i Tr
    ser dd Mand dingle:
    sdan jeg rister
    og tegner Runer,
    at Manden gr hen
    og mler med mig.

    158.
    Det kan jeg for det trettende,
    nr jeg den unge Dreng
    med Vand skal vde:
    ej mon han falde,
    om i Fylking han kommer;
    ej segner den Mand for Svrd.

    159.
    Det kan jeg for det fjortende,
    nr jeg for Folkets Skare
    Gudernes Navne skal nvne:
    jeg vd om alle
    Aser og Alfer;
    ej kender den uvise sligt.

    160.
    Det kan jeg for det femtende,
    som Dvrgen Thjodrrer
    gol for Dellings Dre:
    Kraft gol han for Aser,
    Held for Alfer
    og Visdom for den vldige Gud.

    161.
    Det kan jeg for det sekstende,
    nr jeg den snilde Ms
    Hjerte og Elskov vil eje:
    jeg tryller hvidarmet
    Kvindes Tanke
    og vender hele hendes Hu.

    162.
    Det kan jeg for det syttende,
    at sent mig forlader
    den yndige Ungm.
    Lnge vil du end,
    Lodfavne! disse
    Sange savne;
    dog vre de til Held, om du dem har,
    til Nytte, om du dem nemmer,
    til Tarv, om du dem tager.

    163.
    Det kan jeg for det attende,
    som jeg aldrig rber
    for M eller Mands Kone
    - alt er bedre,
    nr kun n det vd -
    s sluttes Sangene -,
    uden for hende ene,
    som i Arm mig favner
    eller min Sster er.

    164.
    Nu er den hjes Taler sungne
    i den hjes Hal,
    til Tarv for Menneskenes Snner.
    Hil den, som kvad dem!
    Hil den, som kan dem!
    Nyde, hvo nemmed!
    Hil den, som lytted!

  3. #3
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    Hvaml - The Sayings of Hr

    Hvaml - The Sayings of Hr

    The numbers are in reference to stanzas
    in Hollander Translation

    1

    The man who stands at a strange threshold,
    Should be cautious before he cross it,
    Glance this way and that:
    Who knows beforehand what foes may sit
    Awaiting him in the hall?

    2

    Greetings to the host,
    The guest has arrived,
    In which seat shall he sit?
    Rash is he who at unknown doors
    Relies on his good luck,

    3

    Fire is needed by the newcomer
    Whose knees are frozen numb;
    Meat and clean linen a man needs
    Who has fared across the fells,

    4

    Water, too, that he may wash before eating,
    Handcloth's and a hearty welcome,
    Courteous words, then courteous silence
    That he may tell his tale,

    5

    Who travels widely needs his wits about him,
    The stupid should stay at home:
    The ignorant man is often laughed at
    When he sits at meat with the sage,

    6

    Of his knowledge a man should never boast,

    Rather be sparing of speech
    When to his house a wiser comes:
    Seldom do those who are silent Make mistakes;
    mother wit Is ever a faithful friend,

    7

    A guest should be courteous
    When he comes to the table
    And sit in wary silence,
    His ears attentive,
    his eyes alert:
    So he protects himself,

    8

    Fortunate is he who is favored in his lifetime
    With praise and words of wisdom:
    Evil counsel is often given
    By those of evil heart,

    9

    Blessed is he who in his own lifetime
    Is awarded praise and wit,
    For ill counsel is often given
    By mortal men to each other,

    10

    Better gear than good sense
    A traveler cannot carry,
    Better than riches for a wretched man,
    Far from his own home,

    11

    Better gear than good sense
    A traveler cannot carry,
    A more tedious burden than too much drink
    A traveler cannot carry,

    12

    Less good than belief would have it
    Is mead for the sons of men:
    A man knows less the more he drinks,
    Becomes a befuddled fool,

    13

    I forget is the name men give the heron
    Who hovers over the feast:
    Fettered I was in his feathers that night,
    When a guest in Gunnlod's court

    14

    Drunk I got, dead drunk,
    When Fjalar the wise was with me:
    Best is the banquet one looks back on after,
    And remembers all that happened,

    15

    Silence becomes the Son of a prince,
    To be silent but brave in battle:
    It befits a man to be merry and glad
    Until the day of his death,

    16

    The coward believes he will live forever
    If he holds back in the battle,
    But in old age he shall have no peace
    Though spears have spared his limbs

    17

    When he meets friends, the fool gapes,
    Is shy and sheepish at first,
    Then he sips his mead and immediately
    All know what an oaf he is,

    18

    He who has seen and suffered much,
    And knows the ways of the world,
    Who has traveled', can tell what spirit
    Governs the men he meets,

    19

    Drink your mead, but in moderation,
    Talk sense or be silent:
    No man is called discourteous who goes
    To bed at an early hour

    20

    A gluttonous man who guzzles away
    Brings sorrow on himself:
    At the table of the wise he is taunted often,
    Mocked for his bloated belly,

    21

    The herd knows its homing time,
    And leaves the grazing ground:
    But the glutton never knows how much
    His belly is able to hold,

    22

    An ill tempered, unhappy man
    Ridicules all he hears,
    Makes fun of others, refusing always
    To see the faults in himself

    23

    Foolish is he who frets at night,
    And lies awake to worry'
    A weary man when morning comes,
    He finds all as bad as before,

    24

    The fool thinks that those who laugh
    At him are all his friends,
    Unaware when he sits with wiser men
    How ill they speak of him.

    25

    The fool thinks that those who laugh
    At him are all his friends:
    When he comes to the Thing and calls for support,
    Few spokesmen he finds

    26

    The fool who fancies he is full of wisdom
    While he sits by his hearth at home.
    Quickly finds when questioned by others .
    That he knows nothing at all.

    27

    The ignorant booby had best be silent
    When he moves among other men,
    No one will know what a nit-wit he is
    Until he begins to talk;
    No one knows less what a nit-wit he is
    Than the man who talks too much.

    28

    To ask well, to answer rightly,
    Are the marks of a wise man:
    Men must speak of men's deeds,
    What happens may not be hidden.

    29

    Wise is he not who is never silent,
    Mouthing meaningless words:
    A glib tongue that goes on chattering
    Sings to its own harm.

    30

    A man among friends should not mock another:
    Many believe the man
    Who is not questioned to know much
    And so he escapes their scorn.

    31

    The wise guest has his way of dealing
    With those who taunt him at table:
    He smiles through the meal,
    not seeming to hear
    The twaddle talked by his foes

    32

    The fastest friends may fall out
    When they sit at the banquet-board:
    It is, and shall be, a shameful thing
    When guest quarrels with guest,

    33

    An early meal a man should take
    Before he visits friends,
    Lest, when he gets there,
    he go hungry,
    Afraid to ask for food.

    34

    To a false friend the footpath winds
    Though his house be on the highway.
    To a sure friend there is a short cut,
    Though he live a long way off.

    35

    The tactful guest will take his leave Early,
    not linger long:
    He starts to stink who outstays his welcome
    In a hall that is not his own.

    36

    A small hut of one's own is better,
    A man is his master at home:
    A couple of goats and a corded roof
    Still are better than begging.

    37

    A small hut of one's own is better,
    A man is his master at home:
    His heart bleeds in the beggar who must
    Ask at each meal for meat.

    38

    A wayfarer should not walk unarmed,
    But have his weapons to hand:
    He knows not when he may need a spear,
    Or what menace meet on the road.

    39

    No man is so generous he will jib at accepting
    A gift in return for a gift,
    No man so rich that it really gives him
    Pain to be repaid.

    40

    Once he has won wealth enough,
    A man should not crave for more:
    What he saves for friends, foes may take;
    Hopes are often liars.

    41

    With presents friends should please each other,
    With a shield or a costly coat:
    Mutual giving makes for friendship
    So long as life goes well,

    42

    A man should be loyal through life to friends,
    And return gift for gift,
    Laugh when they laugh,
    but with lies repay
    A false foe who lies.

    43

    A man should be loyal through life to friends,
    To them and to friends of theirs,
    But never shall a man make offer
    Of friendship to his foes.

    44

    If you find a friend you fully trust
    And wish for his good-will,
    exchange thoughts,
    exchange gifts,
    Go often to his house.

    45

    If you deal with another you don't trust
    But wish for his good-will,
    Be fair in speech but false in thought
    And give him lie for lie.

    46

    Even with one you ill-trust
    And doubt what he means to do,
    False words with fair smiles
    May get you the gift you desire.

    47

    Young and alone on a long road,
    Once I lost my way:
    Rich I felt when I found a another;
    Man rejoices in man.

    48

    The generous and bold have the best lives,
    Are seldom beset by cares,
    But the base man sees bogies everywhere
    And the miser pines for presents.

    49

    Two wooden stakes stood on the plain,
    on them I hung my clothes:
    Draped in linen, they looked well born,
    But, naked, I was a nobody

    50

    The young fir that falls and rots
    Having neither needles nor bark,
    So is the fate of the friendless man:
    Why should he live long?

    51

    Hotter than fire among false hearts burns
    Friendship for five days,
    But suddenly slackens when the sixth dawns:
    Feeble their friendship then.

    52

    A kind word need not cost much,
    The price of praise can be cheap:
    With half a loaf and an empty cup
    I found myself a friend,

    53

    Little a sand-grain, little a dew drop,
    Little the minds of men:
    All men are not equal in wisdom,
    The half-wise are everywhere

    54

    It is best for man to be middle-wise,
    Not over cunning and clever:
    The learned man whose lore is deep
    Is seldom happy at heart.

    55

    It is best for man to be middle-wise,
    Not over cunning and clever:
    The fairest life is led by those
    Who are deft at all they do.

    56

    It is best for man to be middle-wise,
    Not over cunning and clever:
    No man is able to know his future,
    So let him sleep in peace.

    57

    Brand Kindles Till they broun out,
    Flame is quickened by flame:
    One man from another is known by his speech
    The simpleton by his silence.
    58

    Early shall he rise who has designs
    On anothers land or life:
    His prey escapes the prone wolf,
    The sleeper is seldom victorious.

    59

    Early shall he rise who rules few servants,
    And set to work at once:
    Much is lost by the late sleeper,
    Wealth is won by the swift,

    60

    A man should know how many logs
    And strips of bark from the birch
    To stock in autumn, that he may have enough
    Wood for his winter fires.

    61

    Washed and fed,
    one may fare to the Thing:
    Though one's clothes be the worse for Wear,
    None need be ashamed of his shoes or hose,
    Nor of the horse he owns,
    Although no thoroughbred.

    62

    As the eagle who comes to the ocean shore,
    Sniffs and hangs her head,
    Dumfounded is he who finds at the Thing
    No supporters to plead his case.

    63

    It is safe to tell a secret to one,
    Risky to tell it to two,
    To tell it to three is thoughtless folly,
    Everyone else will know.

    64

    Moderate at council should a man be,
    Not brutal and over bearing:
    Among the bold the bully will find
    Others as bold as he.

    65

    Often words uttered to another
    Have reaped an ill harvest:

    66

    Too early to many homes I came,
    Too late, it seemed, to some;
    The ale was finished or else un-brewed,

    The unpopular cannot please.

    67

    Some would invite me to visit their homes,
    But none thought I Had eaten a whole joint,
    Just before with a friend who had two.

    68

    These things are thought the best:
    Fire, the sight of the sun,
    Good health with the gift to keep it,
    And a life that avoids vice.

    69

    Not all sick men are utterly wretched:
    Some are blessed with sons,
    Some with friends,
    some with riches,
    Some with worthy works.

    70

    It is always better to be alive,
    The living can keep a cow.
    Fire, I saw, warming a wealthy man,
    With a cold corpse at his door.

    71

    The halt can manage a horse,
    the handless a flock,
    The deaf be a doughty fighter,
    To be blind is better than to burn on a pyre:
    There is nothing the dead can do.

    72

    A son is a blessing, though born late
    To a father no longer alive:
    Stones would seldom stand by the highway
    If sons did not set them there.

    73

    Two beat one, the tongue is head's bane,
    Pockets of fur hide fists.

    74

    He welcomes the night who has enough provisions
    Short are the sails of a ship,
    Dangerous the dark in autumn,
    The wind may veer within five days,
    And many times in a month.

    75

    The half wit does not know that gold
    Makes apes of many men:
    One is rich, one is poor
    There is no blame in that.

    76

    Cattle die, kindred die,
    Every man is mortal:
    But the good name never dies
    Of one who has done well

    77

    Cattle die, kindred die,
    Every man is mortal:
    But I know one thing that never dies,
    The glory of the great dead

    78

    Fields and flocks had Fitjung's sons,
    Who now carry begging bowls:
    Wealth may vanish in the wink of an eye,
    Gold is the falsest of friends.

    79

    In the fool who acquires cattle and lands,
    Or wins a woman's love,
    His wisdom wanes with his waxing pride,
    He sinks from sense to conceit.

    80

    Now is answered what you ask of the runes,
    Graven by the gods,
    Made by the All Father,
    Sent by the powerful sage:
    lt. is best for man to remain silent.

    81

    For these things give thanks at nightfall:
    The day gone, a guttered torch,
    A sword tested, the troth of a maid,
    Ice crossed, ale drunk.

    82

    Hew wood in wind-time,
    in fine weather sail,
    Tell in the night-time tales to house-girls,
    For too many eyes are open by day:
    From a ship expect speed, from a shield, cover,
    Keenness from a sword,
    but a kiss from a girl.

    83

    Drink ale by the hearth, over ice glide,
    Buy a stained sword, buy a starving mare
    To fatten at home: and fatten the watch-dog.

    84

    No man should trust a maiden's words,
    Nor what a woman speaks:
    Spun on a wheel were women's hearts,
    In their breasts was implanted caprice,

    85

    A snapping bow, a burning flame,
    A grinning wolf, a grunting boar,
    A raucous crow, a rootless tree,
    A breaking wave, a boiling kettle,

    86

    A flying arrow, an ebbing tide,
    A coiled adder, the ice of a night,
    A bride's bed talk, a broad sword,
    A bear's play, a prince' s children,

    87

    A witch' s welcome, the wit of a slave,
    A sick calf, a corpse still fresh,

    88

    A brother's killer encountered upon
    The highway a house half-burned,
    A racing stallion who has wrenched a leg,
    Are never safe: let no man trust them.

    89

    Trust not an acre early sown,
    Nor praise a son too soon:
    Weather rules the acre, wit the son,
    Both are exposed to peril,

    90

    To love a woman whose ways are false
    Is like sledding over slippery ice
    With unshod horses out of control,
    Badly trained two-year-olds,
    Or drifting rudderless on a rough sea,
    Or catching a reindeer with a crippled hand
    On a thawing hillside: think not to do it.

    91

    Naked I may speak now for I know both:
    Men are treacherous too
    Fairest we speak when falsest we think:
    many a maid is deceived.

    92

    Gallantly shall he speak and gifts bring
    Who wishes for woman's love:
    praise the features of the fair girl,
    Who courts well will conquer.

    93

    Never reproach another for his love:
    It happens often enough
    That beauty ensnares with desire the wise
    While the foolish remain unmoved.

    94

    Never reproach the plight of another,
    For it happens to many men:
    Strong desire may stupefy heroes,
    Dull the wits of the wise

    95

    The mind alone knows what is near the heart,
    Each is his own judge:
    The worst sickness for a wise man
    Is to crave what he cannot enjoy.

    96

    So I learned when I sat in the reeds,
    Hoping to have my desire:
    Lovely was the flesh of that fair girl,
    But nothing I hoped for happened.

    97

    I saw on a bed Billing's daughter,
    Sun white, asleep:
    No greater delight I longed for then
    Than to lie in her lovely arms.

    98

    "Come" Odhinn, after nightfall
    If you wish for a meeting with me:
    All would be lost if anyone saw us
    And learned that we were lovers."

    99

    Afire with longing"; I left her then,
    Deceived by her soft words:

    I thought my wooing had won the maid,
    That I would have my way.

    100

    After nightfall I hurried back,
    But the warriors were all awake,
    Lights were burning, blazing torches:
    So false proved the path

    101

    Towards daybreak back I came
    The guards were sound asleep:
    I found then that the fair woman
    Had tied a ***** to her bed.

    102

    Many a girl when one gets to know her
    Proves to be fickle and false:
    That treacherous maiden taught me a lesson,
    The crafty woman covered me with shame";
    That was all I got from her.

    103

    Let a man with his guests be glad and merry,
    Modest a man should be";
    But talk well if he intends to be wise
    And expects praise from men:
    Fimbul fambi is the fool called ";
    Unable to open his mouth.

    104

    Fruitless my errand, had I been silent
    When I came to Suttung's courts:
    With spirited words I spoke to my profit
    In the hall of the aged giant.

    105

    Rati had gnawed a narrow passage,
    Chewed a channel through stone,
    A path around the roads of giants:
    I was like to lose my head

    106

    Gunnlod sat me in the golden seat,
    Poured me precious mead:
    Ill reward she had from me for that,
    For her proud and passionate heart,
    Her brooding foreboding spirit.
    107
    What I won from her I have well used:
    I have waxed in wisdom since I came back,
    bringing to Asgard Odrerir,
    the sacred draught.

    108

    Hardly would I have come home alive
    From the garth of the grim troll,
    Had Gunnlod not helped me, the good woman,
    Who wrapped her arms around me.

    109

    The following day the Frost Giants came,
    Walked into Har's hall To ask for Har's advice:
    Had Bolverk they asked, come back to his friends,
    Or had he been slain by Suttung?

    110

    Odhinn, they said, swore an oath on his ring:
    Who from now on will trust him?
    By fraud at the feast he befuddled Suttung
    And brought grief to Gunnlod.

    111

    It is time to sing in the seat of the wise,
    Of what at Urd's Well I saw in silence,
    saw and thought on.
    Long I listened to men
    Runes heard spoken, (counsels revealed.)
    At Har's hall, In Har's hall:
    There I heard this.

    112

    Loddfafnir, listen to my counsel:
    You will fare well if you follow it,
    It will help you much if you heed it.
    Never rise at night unless you need to spy
    Or to ease yourself in the outhouse.

    113

    Shun a woman, wise in magic,
    Her bed and her embraces:

    114

    If she cast a spell, you will care no longer
    To meet and speak with men,
    Desire no food, desire no pleasure,
    In sorrow fall asleep.

    115

    Never seduce anothers wife,
    Never make her your mistress.

    116

    If you must journey to mountains and firths,
    Take food and fodder with you.

    117

    Never open your heart to an evil man
    When fortune does not favour you:
    From an evil man, if you make him your friend,
    You will get evil for good.

    118

    I saw a warrior wounded fatally
    By the words of an evil woman
    Her cunning tongue caused his death,
    Though what she alleged was a lie.

    119

    If you know a friend you can fully trust,
    Go often to his house
    Grass and brambles grow quickly
    Upon the untrodden track.

    120

    With a good man it is good to talk,
    Make him your fast friend:
    But waste no words on a witless oaf,
    Nor sit with a senseless ape.

    121

    Cherish those near you, never be
    The first to break with a friend:
    Care eats him who can no longer
    Open his heart to another.

    122

    An evil man, if you make him your friend,
    Will give you evil for good:

    123

    A good man, if you make him your friend";
    Will praise you in every place,

    124

    Affection is mutual when men can open
    All their heart to each other:
    He whose words are always fair
    Is untrue and not to be trusted.

    125

    Bandy no speech with a bad man:
    Often the better is beaten
    In a word fight by the worse.

    126

    Be not a cobbler nor a carver of shafts,
    Except it be for yourself:
    If a shoe fit ill or a shaft be crooked";
    The maker gets curses and kicks.

    127

    If aware that another is wicked, say so:
    Make no truce or treaty with foes.

    128

    Never share in the shamefully gotten,
    But allow yourself what is lawful.

    129

    Never lift your eyes and look up in battle,
    Lest the heroes enchant you,
    who can change warriors
    Suddenly into hogs,

    130

    With a good woman, if you wish to enjoy
    Her words and her good will,
    Pledge her fairly and be faithful to it:
    Enjoy the good you are given,

    131

    Be not over wary, but wary enough,
    First, of the foaming ale,
    Second, of a woman wed to another,
    Third, of the tricks of thieves.

    132

    Mock not the traveler met On the road,
    Nor maliciously laugh at the guest:

    133

    The sitters in the hall seldom know
    The kin of the new-comer:
    The best man is marred by faults,
    The worst is not without worth.

    134

    Never laugh at the old when they offer counsel,
    Often their words are wise:
    From shriveled skin, from scraggy things

    That hand among the hides
    And move amid the guts,
    Clear words often come.

    135
    Scoff not at guests nor to the gate chase them,
    But relieve the lonely and wretched,

    136

    Heavy the beam above the door;
    Hang a horse-shoe On it
    Against ill-luck, lest it should suddenly
    Crash and crush your guests.

    137

    Medicines exist against many evils:
    Earth against drunkenness, heather against worms
    Oak against costiveness, corn against sorcery,
    Spurred rye against rupture, runes against bales
    The moon against feuds, fire against sickness,
    Earth makes harmless the floods.
    138

    Wounded I hung on a wind-swept gallows
    For nine long nights,
    Pierced by a spear, pledged to Odhinn,
    Offered, myself to myself
    The wisest know not from whence spring
    The roots of that ancient rood

    139

    They gave me no bread,
    They gave me no mead,
    I looked down;
    with a loud cry
    I took up runes;
    from that tree I fell.

    140

    Nine lays of power
    I learned from the famous Bolthor, Bestla' s father:
    He poured me a draught of precious mead,
    Mixed with magic Odrerir.

    141

    Waxed and throve well;
    Word from word gave words to me,
    Deed from deed gave deeds to me,

    142

    Runes you will find, and readable staves,
    Very strong staves,
    Very stout staves,
    Staves that Bolthor stained,
    Made by mighty powers,
    Graven by the prophetic god,


    143

    For the gods by Odhinn, for the elves by Dain,
    By Dvalin, too, for the dwarves,
    By Asvid for the hateful giants,
    And some I carved myself:
    Thund, before man was made, scratched them,
    Who rose first, fell thereafter

    144

    Know how to cut them, know how to read them,
    Know how to stain them, know how to prove them,
    Know how to evoke them, know how to score them,
    Know how to send them"; know how to send them,

    145

    Better not to ask than to over-pledge
    As a gift that demands a gift";
    Better not to send than to slay too many,

    146

    The first charm I know is unknown to rulers
    Or any of human kind;
    Help it is named,
    for help it can give In hours of sorrow and anguish.

    147

    I know a second that the sons of men
    Must learn who wish to be leeches.

    148

    I know a third: in the thick of battle,
    If my need be great enough,
    It will blunt the edges of enemy swords,
    Their weapons will make no wounds.

    149

    I know a fourth:
    it will free me quickly
    If foes should bind me fast
    With strong chains, a chant that makes Fetters spring from the feet,
    Bonds burst from the hands.

    150

    I know a fifth: no flying arrow,
    Aimed to bring harm to men,
    Flies too fast for my fingers to catch it
    And hold it in mid-air.

    151

    I know a sixth:
    it will save me if a man
    Cut runes on a sapling' s Roots
    With intent to harm; it turns the spell;
    The hater is harmed, not me.

    152

    I know a seventh:
    If I see the hall
    Ablaze around my bench mates,
    Though hot the flames, they shall feel nothing,
    If I choose to chant the spell.

    153

    I know an eighth:
    that all are glad of,
    Most useful to men:
    If hate fester in the heart of a warrior,
    It will soon calm and cure him.

    154

    I know a ninth:
    when need I have
    To shelter my ship on the flood,
    The wind it calms, the waves it smoothes
    And puts the sea to sleep,

    155

    I know a tenth:
    if troublesome ghosts
    Ride the rafters aloft,
    I can work it so they wander astray,
    Unable to find their forms,
    Unable to find their homes.

    156

    I know an eleventh:
    when I lead to battle Old comrades in-arms,
    I have only to chant it behind my shield,
    And unwounded they go to war,
    Unwounded they come from war,
    Unscathed wherever they are.

    157

    I know a twelfth:
    If a tree bear
    A man hanged in a halter,
    I can carve and stain strong runes
    That will cause the corpse to speak,
    Reply to whatever I ask.

    158

    I know a thirteenth
    if I throw a cup Of water over a warrior,
    He shall not fall in the fiercest battle,
    Nor sink beneath the sword,

    159

    I know a fourteenth, that few know:
    If I tell a troop of warriors
    About the high ones, elves and gods,
    I can name them one by one.
    (Few can the nit-wit name.)

    160

    I know a fifteenth,
    that first Thjodrerir
    Sang before Delling's doors,
    Giving power to gods, prowess to elves,
    Fore-sight to Hroptatyr Odhinn,

    161

    I know a sixteenth:
    if I see a girl
    With whom it would please me to play,
    I can turn her thoughts, can touch the heart
    Of any white armed woman.

    162

    I know a seventeenth:
    if I sing it,
    the young Girl will be slow to forsake me.

    163
    To learn to sing them, Loddfafnir,
    Will take you a long time,
    Though helpful they are if you understand them,
    Useful if you use them,
    Needful if you need them.

    164

    I know an eighteenth that I never tell
    To maiden or wife of man,
    A secret I hide from all
    Except the love who lies in my arms,
    Or else my own sister.

    165

    The Wise One has spoken words in the hall,
    Needful for men to know,
    Unneedful for trolls to know:
    Hail to the speaker,
    Hail to the knower,
    Joy to him who has understood,
    Delight to those who have listened.


  4. #4
    Member Eikinskjaldi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sigurd View Post
    Hvaml - The Sayings of Hr


    85

    A snapping bow, a burning flame,
    A grinning wolf, a grunting boar,
    A raucous crow, a rootless tree,
    A breaking wave, a boiling kettle,

    86

    A flying arrow, an ebbing tide,
    A coiled adder, the ice of a night,
    A bride's bed talk, a broad sword,
    A bear's play, a prince' s children,

    87

    A witch' s welcome, the wit of a slave,
    A sick calf, a corpse still fresh,

    88

    A brother's killer encountered upon
    The highway a house half-burned,
    A racing stallion who has wrenched a leg,
    Are never safe: let no man trust them.



    These are some of my favorite stanzas from the Hovamol.

    The Henry Adams Bellows translation (1923) reads:

    85. In a breaking bow or a burning flame,

    A ravening wolf or a croaking raven,

    In a grunting boar, a tree with roots broken,

    In billowy seas or a bubbling kettle,

    86. In a flying arrow or falling waters,

    In ice new formed or the serpent's folds,

    In a bride's bed-speech or a broken sword,

    In the sport of bears or in sons of kings,

    87. In a calf that is sick or a stubborn thrall,

    A flattering witch or a foe new slain.

    88. In a brother's slayer, if thou meet him abroad,

    In a half-burned house, in a horse full swift-

    One leg is hurt and the horse is useless-

    None had ever such faith as to trust in them all.

  5. #5
    Radical Traditionalist :hverungur:'s Avatar
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    I prefer James Hjuka Coulters translation of Havamal best myself. Edred Wodanson has a nice book out there too.
    E-mail: odalist@gmail.com
    AOL IM: Blood Und Soil

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    Member Eikinskjaldi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by :hverungur: View Post
    I prefer James Hjuka Coulters translation of Havamal best myself. Edred Wodanson has a nice book out there too.
    Do you own the Coulter translation? If you do, would be so kind as to post stanzas number 85 to 88 so that I may compare it to the other two here?

    Regards, Eikinskjaldi.

  7. #7
    Radical Traditionalist :hverungur:'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eikinskjaldi
    Do you own the Coulter translation? If you do, would be so kind as to post stanzas number 85 to 88 so that I may compare it to the other two here?

    Regards, Eikinskjaldi.
    No problem:
    [85]A Brittle bow, a burning flame
    A yawning wolf, a grunting sow
    A cackling crow, a boiling kettle
    A rising wave, a rootless tree
    [86]A flying arrow, an ebbing tide
    New ice, a coiled adder
    A womans bed talk, a broken sword
    Bears at play, the children of kings
    [87]A sick calf
    A slave who has declared himself free
    A witches pleasant speech
    A recently slain warrior
    [88]Your brothers killer-
    Regardless if you meet him upon the road
    The half-burned home, a quick horse-
    He's worthless should be break a leg:
    In all of these things
    Let no one place his trust!
    Enjoy
    E-mail: odalist@gmail.com
    AOL IM: Blood Und Soil

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