View Poll Results: Have you ever considered immigration?

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    73 79.35%
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Thread: Have You Ever Considered Immigration?

  1. #91
    Senior Member RoyBatty's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Heinrich Harrer View Post
    Still, if you immigrate into another non-germanic nation as an individual, you will just be assimilated and incorporated into their people.
    As an "individual" then perhaps yes, in particular this applies to countries like the USA where the system is quite successful at assimilating immigrants and hooking them on Americanism. (Not sure what this abstract Americanism really is or that the immigrants know exactly what it is either but it usually involves a lot of posing with the flag, a few pretty words about freedom & liberty, their interpretation of "The American Dream", chasing money etc etc)

    There are countless examples on the Internet when one reads through the blogs / homepages & biographies of recent immigrants to the US and to what lengths they go to become more American than American.

    It's somewhat different for immigrants into countries such as the UK. Imo you don't really assimilate here. You either remain an outsider or you integrate into a local ghetto of your countrymen / women who also moved there. Case in point & examples in London:

    - Sikhs in Southall
    - Various Asians / Indian Subcontinent in Hounslow area
    - Bangladeshis in Tower Hamlets
    - Jews in Golders Green
    - Blacks / Caribs in SE London
    - White South Africans in SW London
    - Japanese in North London
    - South Koreans in New Malden area
    - Polacks.... by virtue of their numbers they have ghettos everywhere, not even the paytoilets are safe from infestation by them (yes they actually move in and sleep there at night)

    Jews certainly don't assimilate or lose their cultural identity wherever they move to.

    Germans in Southern Africa usually retain their German identity.

    So imo I think it very much depends on a number of factors whether one will really be assimilated outside your Heimat or not.

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  3. #92
    Senior Member velvet's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bernhard
    But the Indo-Europeans who migrated to southern Scandinavia and northern Germany to become the first Germanics came from elsewhere as well.
    But they moved as a "nation" into a formerly uninhabitable area, which was though connected through land with the initial settlement area, so it's not really "migration", only expansion.

    Quote Originally Posted by Bernhard
    And from this Germanic Urheimat they also spread towards other areas which were populated by Celts or other tribes and later on to places inhabited by Romans, Slavs and Balts.
    When they find timberframe houses from a time when there was no Roman empire nor Roman people, when they find wheels and ploughs that are even older, and considering that the Slavs are a way younger people than Germanics, I fairly dare to doubt that. It was rather vice versa, the Slavs ate away Germanic territory, and did so in already historic times. Tacitus' map of Germania didnt have Slavs anywhere near.

    For the Celts the same, their ethnogenesis is much later too than the Germanic one, and they seem to be a much more mobile tribe then, though I think that conflicts with them, specially in the SW-European areas, were rather nonexistent and settlements could even exist side by side for a long time, maybe only changing with the Roman empire being able to conquer the dominantly Celtic areas (of later France, Belgium, SW Germany and the British Isles), but failed to do so for the dominantly Germanic areas (the Romans even built a wall to keep us out ), where the seperation was reinforced.

    Quote Originally Posted by Bernhard
    It took place in Europe, yes, but one can also migrate without leaving Europe.
    Sure, but I still think that our people are way longer here than other, later groups

    Quote Originally Posted by Bernhard
    I agree with you. Our ancestors migrated by conquest or settling as farmers. But would it be alright then if Arabs and other present day immigrants did it the same way as our ancestors did? Of course not. And that's what I mean by saying that it's not the claim that our ancestors were immigrants as well that is problematic, but the reasoning behind it, which is the human rights kind of argument that we should grant other ethnicities the same rights as we grant ourselves. From our point of view, it doesn't matter whether our ancestors were immigrants our not, thus making it invalid as an argument to justify immigration of Arabs into our lands.
    Indeed!
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    und endet meine Frist, weiss ich dass du noch da bist
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  4. #93
    Ein echter Deutscher "Friend of Germanics"
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    Considered it since everyone except my parents is in Germany and i feel no particular attachment to this country. At this point i would only do it if i could buy citizenship and was not too worried about money.

    On the other hand, i think some on here are making it sound easier than it is to emigrate to Europe. I believe if you want to move to the UK from outside Europe they will look at your education (PH.d good), age (younger the better), and bank account (bigger the better).

    I lived in Scotland for a time which is obviously a first world english speaking country. I did get homesick for the states where you can get in your car and drive forever, shotgun rack in the window, and everything is big and 24/7. I think some americans would also have trouble wrapping their heads around the concept of an ASBO, which we dont have here.

  5. #94
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    Quote Originally Posted by velvet View Post
    But they moved as a "nation" into a formerly uninhabitable area, which was though connected through land with the initial settlement area, so it's not really "migration", only expansion.
    Well, expansion is just migration of a part of the people without loosing touch with their homeland so it includes migration as well. But what really matters is whether this area to which they moved was really uninhabited or not. Since you say it's uninhabitable I reckon you're referring to the people who migrated to this part of Europe after the last ice age? I was mostly focusing on the Indo-Europeans, but you're right, the pre-Indo-Europeans are our ancestors as well, so this makes the question a lot more difficult. In the broader sense, all our ancestors were immigrants, but only our indo-european ancestors (and thus our cultural ancestors) were immigrants in the sense that they migrated into already inhabited areas, albeit that these were far less inhabited than they are now. The exact impact it had on non-indo-european societies is unknown; archaeologists used to think they subjected the natives by force, but as far as I know this view isn't shared by everyone anymore.
    At least we can say that in the end we come from elsewhere as well and part of our ancestors settled uninhabited land, but another part of our ancestors were later immigrants who eventually merged with the natives to form what we today know as Germanic. But after the Germanic homeland had been established they migrated to neighbouring areas, from which we surely know that they were inhabited by other people.

    Quote Originally Posted by velvet View Post
    When they find timberframe houses from a time when there was no Roman empire nor Roman people, when they find wheels and ploughs that are even older, and considering that the Slavs are a way younger people than Germanics, I fairly dare to doubt that. It was rather vice versa, the Slavs ate away Germanic territory, and did so in already historic times. Tacitus' map of Germania didnt have Slavs anywhere near.

    For the Celts the same, their ethnogenesis is much later too than the Germanic one, and they seem to be a much more mobile tribe then, though I think that conflicts with them, specially in the SW-European areas, were rather nonexistent and settlements could even exist side by side for a long time, maybe only changing with the Roman empire being able to conquer the dominantly Celtic areas (of later France, Belgium, SW Germany and the British Isles), but failed to do so for the dominantly Germanic areas (the Romans even built a wall to keep us out ), where the seperation was reinforced.
    Southern Germany and the south of the Netherlands and Flanders were Celtic; this we know among others because of names of rivers and other landmarks. The east has had a dynamic history. It has been inhabited by east-germanics, but most of them eventually moved to the south and to the west, creating an opportunity for the Slavs to settle there. Later on Germanics (although a different tribe, the Germans) settled the east again, which was populated by Slavs at the time. They also settled land which became Germanic for the first time, namely East Prussia. There is no doubt that to the baltic Prussians the Germans were alien invaders and immigrants. The same goes for the west, where Germanics settled in the Roman empire (with the Franks being a good example of guest workers, the empire needed them to protect the border) and eventually expanded and conquered huge parts of it.
    So yes, large parts of the current Germanic homeland had once been Celtic, Roman, Slavic (even though it was Germanic before that) or even pre-Indo-European. Entire human history is characterized by migrations of people. I remember something about a Germanic tradition that every 9 years a part of the tribe had to leave and find their home elsewhere. But of course the further you go back in time, the smaller the chance that they stumbled upon other people while migrating, but it still happened very often. Think of the Cimbrians in northern Italy for example.

    About the ethnogenesis of the Celts, I think it's hard to say "who was first". The oldest sources from antiquity thought the Germanics to be part of the Celts actually, but of course this doesn't say anything.

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  7. #95
    Senior Member Uwe Jens Lornsen's Avatar
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    Yes, just across the border to Denmark
    in the 1990s when everything had been still "native" .

    Available money had been the reason to stay in Germany,
    and I did not hate my country and countrymen that much,
    like I do since the fugee-flood in year 2015.
    Mk 10:18 What do you call me a good master, no-one is good .

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  9. #96
    Senior Member Rodskarl Dubhgall's Avatar
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    The question is one of "emigration". Anyway, I had the wanderlust until being responsible for wife and children at home. I came to value community as I did before teenage years. I have lived in enough places to feel ambivalent about removal. I would only do it for love and not necessarily for money, unless it was for love--not the love of money.
    https://forums.skadi.net/image.php?type=sigpic&userid=45371&datel  ine=1529458786

  10. #97
    Senior Member Finnish Swede's Avatar
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    Yes I have....

    * Australia & NZ
    * USA & Canada
    * Norway (west coast)

    Still today whole word ''immigrate'' has so bad sound.
    And I would never do it, if I would not/could not feel welcomed on that country.

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  12. #98
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    Quote Originally Posted by Finnish Swede View Post
    Yes I have....

    * Australia & NZ
    * USA & Canada
    * Norway (west coast)

    Still today whole word ''immigrate'' has so bad sound.
    And I would never do it, if I would not/could not feel welcomed on that country.
    I'm sure that you would be welcome in any part of your list.

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  14. #99
    Senior Member SaxonCeorl's Avatar
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    Yes, UK and Australia. UK would be more difficult due to work visa rules; Australia would probably be a bit easier. But then, I'm afraid of all those scary critters they apparently have there!

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  16. #100
    Senior Member Finnish Swede's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hammish View Post
    I'm sure that you would be welcome in any part of your list.
    Oh. At least in Norway (I have been there couple of times ). Plus no any special visas would be needed.

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