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Thread: Best Martial Art Against Multiple Attackers?

  1. #171
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    Quote Originally Posted by Karolvs View Post
    Martial arts training is not as effective as you think. Think Military styled training. In the Marines my drill instructor would call out anyone with marrtial arts training and take them out in under two seconds. Its all about the weak spots...eyes, knees, throat, etc. Me and my fellow Marines have put these tactics to the test, they work even against MMA pros, when you are fighting for your life, there is no better techniques
    I agree with your post. I am a former machine gunner/lance corporal with the infantery and 2 times bosnian veteran and thinking and acting "military" style is more effective then the average martial art lesson in your local youth centre. As said, it is all about the weak spots and you can take on everybody, even armed with guns and knives. As long as don't pull the trigger you have equal chances of course.

    I think Krav Maga is very suitable for learning what to do and how to act in real-life situations as long as you have the proper mind set for it. It has one rule: there are none. And that works perfectly in order to "find" the weak spots of your foe and taking advantage of them.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Leonhardt View Post
    The videos in the previous post showed how to not allow yourself to become surrounded, and not take punches from all sides. It is sometimes called staying outside of the circle.
    Try to not get grabbed, and dragged to the ground.
    Rolling techniques, and getting up from the ground quickly are also important.
    Indeed. And never, ever, go to the ground voluntarily no matter what the BJJ crowd says.

    Therefore it is rather "funny" to see the US Army's present FM 21-150, all that is missing is the models wearing speedos. Some people say it's that way since the Army does not want to get sued for some private killing some civilian in a bar brawl, so they teach them "safe" techniques to stay on the safe side. At least that crap is supposed to be good for morale or something.

  3. #173
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    Best Martial Arts.

    I guess everyone has their own opinion on what's best. No right or wrong answer here. My experiences are I have done boxing (2 years) and karate (brown belt) in the past and switched to WT or Wing Tsun. It is a style of self defence that is not a sport and is more oriented toward dealing with street style fights and multiple attackers. Basically we train to move in as soon as someone initiates an attack and keep going with fists, hands, knees, elbows, feet etc, until the opponent is neutralised. Preferred not to go to the ground but we also have ground fighting sessions just in case. I am a lot more confident with this as we do a lot of scenario training, people, screaming at you, confined spaces, lights off, people attacking from all directions etc. - gets the adrenalin going! Have been doing for nearly 4 years and loving it. Also works for women. Check out www.wingtsun.com.au

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    My problem with a lot of training that takes place is that it does not focus on transition to a weapon. You engage unarmed and then keep on engaging unarmed when you should reach for something more substantive than your empty hand. If you look at police training the focus is to get the assailant off focus and then go for CS, taser, baton or gun; you do not engage in a fistfight with all those goodies on your belt.

    I feel that many martial arts focus too much on the means and not enough on the ends. Fighting is about winning and not about techniques, and I would rather be able to deploy a collapsible baton as quickly as possible than having the perfect sidekick.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Stealth View Post
    I guess everyone has their own opinion on what's best. No right or wrong answer here. My experiences are I have done boxing (2 years) and karate (brown belt) in the past and switched to WT or Wing Tsun. It is a style of self defence that is not a sport and is more oriented toward dealing with street style fights and multiple attackers. Basically we train to move in as soon as someone initiates an attack and keep going with fists, hands, knees, elbows, feet etc, until the opponent is neutralised. Preferred not to go to the ground but we also have ground fighting sessions just in case. I am a lot more confident with this as we do a lot of scenario training, people, screaming at you, confined spaces, lights off, people attacking from all directions etc. - gets the adrenalin going! Have been doing for nearly 4 years and loving it. Also works for women. Check out www.wingtsun.com.au
    Its not a bad system Wing Tsun at least one German SWAT team uses it although I cant recall the name off the top of my head. Also US special forces use some parts of Wing Chun. Duncan Leung also trained some US special forces teams. His teachings are freely available and effective. I went to a seminar of his and would really not want to fight him.

    I did Wing Chun for about 3 years or was it 4? I also tried its patented version Wing Tsun and liked it. Currently I am all about internal martial arts. My favorite Xing Yi was drilled into elite Chinese units on more than one occasion, the latest being WW2. They incorporated some of it into modern Chinese military Sanda the classified system that works unlike that Wushu Sanda that gets beaten every time but looks nice.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Neophyte View Post
    My problem with a lot of training that takes place is that it does not focus on transition to a weapon. You engage unarmed and then keep on engaging unarmed when you should reach for something more substantive than your empty hand. If you look at police training the focus is to get the assailant off focus and then go for CS, taser, baton or gun; you do not engage in a fistfight with all those goodies on your belt.

    I feel that many martial arts focus too much on the means and not enough on the ends. Fighting is about winning and not about techniques, and I would rather be able to deploy a collapsible baton as quickly as possible than having the perfect sidekick.
    This old devils specialty seems to be weapon transition. He trained a lot of special forces back in the day.

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    I am a blue belt in BJJ, wrestled for about a decade in youth leagues on up into high school and trained Muay Thai for about 5 years. It is your basic "MMA" set up, although I never cross trained, simply trained in each respective discipline. With this in mind, I can say other than some basic hip throws/arm drags, wrestling and jiu-jitsu are pretty useless against multiple people. Muay Thai is much better in that regard.

    I have begun studying Aikido after having moved. For the real world, I will honestly say that I prefer Aikido to other the other martial arts I have studied. Can I throw someone down, bash their skull in, break their bones, or choke the life out of them? Absolutely. But that level of force is not always justifiable to a court. I have a family and real world responsibilities to be aware of. If I can incapacitate an attacker in the most efficient, non-lethal means possible, I will end up not only saving my skin but be relatively free of legal consequence.

    In Aikido, we routinely train for multiple attackers. Our randori consists of fending ourselves from a constant stream of strikes and grabs from multiple opponents. Despite being a grappling art, you never feel "tied-up" with opponents, nor do you necessarily need to go to the ground with them. It all flows and blends well and allows for ease of movement. Aikido is based on the samurai fighting style that was used on the battlefield. Yes, you may be squared off in one on one combat but at any moment someone may strike you with a katana or tanto from any angle, you need to be able to effectively deal with that scenario as well.

    I am lucky that my dojo focuses on the martial aspects of Aikido, as many schools focus on the -ki-, which is a more spiritual aspect (think throwing opponents through the air with a flick of your wrist). Our Aikido is very combat oriented.

    In a multiple attacker scenario, I would use a combination of Muay Thai (for quick, primarily defensive strikes) and Aikido (to incapacitate via throws and joint locks) and flee as quickly as possible.

    All that said, the best defense in any life-threatening self-defense situation is a gun. I am confident in my fighting abilities but guns are the great equalizer. If my grip is off slightly, the blade plunges into me. For the most part, a gun removes that room for error. Bang bang. The only issue with using that is ensuring, without a shadow of a doubt, that you had no other option.

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    Quote Originally Posted by wdrake View Post
    I am a blue belt in BJJ, wrestled for about a decade in youth leagues on up into high school and trained Muay Thai for about 5 years. It is your basic "MMA" set up, although I never cross trained, simply trained in each respective discipline. With this in mind, I can say other than some basic hip throws/arm drags, wrestling and jiu-jitsu are pretty useless against multiple people. Muay Thai is much better in that regard.

    I have begun studying Aikido after having moved. For the real world, I will honestly say that I prefer Aikido to other the other martial arts I have studied. Can I throw someone down, bash their skull in, break their bones, or choke the life out of them? Absolutely. But that level of force is not always justifiable to a court. I have a family and real world responsibilities to be aware of. If I can incapacitate an attacker in the most efficient, non-lethal means possible, I will end up not only saving my skin but be relatively free of legal consequence.

    In Aikido, we routinely train for multiple attackers. Our randori consists of fending ourselves from a constant stream of strikes and grabs from multiple opponents. Despite being a grappling art, you never feel "tied-up" with opponents, nor do you necessarily need to go to the ground with them. It all flows and blends well and allows for ease of movement. Aikido is based on the samurai fighting style that was used on the battlefield. Yes, you may be squared off in one on one combat but at any moment someone may strike you with a katana or tanto from any angle, you need to be able to effectively deal with that scenario as well.

    I am lucky that my dojo focuses on the martial aspects of Aikido, as many schools focus on the -ki-, which is a more spiritual aspect (think throwing opponents through the air with a flick of your wrist). Our Aikido is very combat oriented.

    In a multiple attacker scenario, I would use a combination of Muay Thai (for quick, primarily defensive strikes) and Aikido (to incapacitate via throws and joint locks) and flee as quickly as possible.

    All that said, the best defense in any life-threatening self-defense situation is a gun. I am confident in my fighting abilities but guns are the great equalizer. If my grip is off slightly, the blade plunges into me. For the most part, a gun removes that room for error. Bang bang. The only issue with using that is ensuring, without a shadow of a doubt, that you had no other option.
    Aikido done well is really something and Muay Thai is a respectable basic striking art. That mix should work well. What you train should be dependent on what you want to achieve. Aikido is a lot deeper than Muay Thai. You might like arts like Bagua the system used by imperial body guards back in the day. A good all around system.

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    Bagua application


    Bagua form


    As you can see from the form it is just full of applications for throwing and striking. I hope to study it one day.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Edgard View Post
    As you can see from the form it is just full of applications for throwing and striking. I hope to study it one day.
    He's letting his opponent's hands too close to his body. Remember that in studies done with police officers around 90 percent of them fail to spot a knife in their opponents' hands. So if your opponents opens a folder or an automatic knife or something like that, chances are that you will fail to notive it. Then letting their hands come that close will be the end of you.

    Compare that with what's practised in, say, Aikido. There you will find a strong emphasis on either controlling their hands or keeping them as far away from your body as possible.

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