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Thread: Questions about "kobolds" and their origins

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    Questions about "kobolds" and their origins

    I am interested in reading more about kobolds and their "origins".

    I know that in the pre-historic tribes of the balck forest there were rituals surrounding the "creation" of a kobold. What I know of it is that a child would be born, and kept in a cave with no human contact until (maybe) it's 5th birthday. At which point it would be taken from the cave at night and sacrificed, by being stabbed through the heart twice. Once with a bronze spear and again with an iron spear. The body would then be burned. The kobold's spirt would reside in the burned bones.

    I am looking for books or websites that discuss this ritual. ANy suggestions would be helpful

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    Re: Questions about kobolds and the origins of

    fasaniating were these kobolds picked out from groups of new born orphans or slaves? I'd like to learn more
    "A star is extinguished, another will begin to shine - thus it is written in the Book of Nature" - Guido von list, 'Der Ubesiegbare'

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    Re: Questions about kobolds and the origins of

    Here's a bit more info:

    "Hinzelmann is the name of the most famous German Kobolds. He allegedly haunted the castle of Hudemühlen from the years 1584-1588. Hinzelmann especially loved children, and would frequently take the form of a child to play with other children. He was very mischevious, but he was kind to those who respected him, and often gave them gifts...
    Also: "Hinzelmann" is a german folktale written down by the brothers Grimm. It says...that he haunted the castle Hudemühlen in Northern Germany...and did a lot of work in the household. He mentioned that he originally came from the Black Wood. He was very friendly and helpful, as long as he was respected and as long as he got warm milk and food every morning. Nobody ever saw him, they only heard his voice, a child's voice, and one occasion, some people saw a little hand. At that time he was in the castle, people sometimes saw a strangely-clad child, dressed in old-fashioned red velvet, playing with the other children, but it would disappear as soon as they talked to him. The master of that castle persuaded Hinzelmann to let him touch his face, and he felt only bone. Hinzelmann would become very angry, when somebody accused him of being a demon or some devilish creature, he pointed out that he was a Christian boy. One day, the cook persuaded Hinzelmann to show himself to her, and he told her, she would have to take two buckets of water and come to the cellar at night. She did, and when she entered the cellar, she saw a hole in the ground, and in it lay the body of a four-year-old child, stabbed by two swords and all bloody. She fainted, so Hinzelmann then poured the water over her to wake her up again. Hinzelmann left Hudemuehlen after four years had passed and left three things there: a straw hat, a small, hollow cross and a leather glova embroidered with pearls. He told the Lord that as long as these three things be kept together, the family would prosper. If the were separated, the family line would die. Eventually the lord gave the tokens away, I don't know what has become of the family."
    (from http://www.frowl.org/gods/gods.html#hin)

    "Hinzelmann (sometimes called Luring) was a kobold, especially notable for a specific historical account, hailing from northern Germany. According to legend, he was a household spirit of ambivalent nature, similar to Robin Goodfellow, who could provide good luck and perform household tasks, but become malicious if not appeased.

    Hinzelmann was said often to take the form of a child in red velvet, if he had to take any form whatsoever, but his true form (as he showed to a maid once, who instantly passed out) was that of a small child, around four years of age, stabbed and slashed with two swords. Hinzelmann was best known for haunting the castle Hudemühlen, after being discovered in 1584. He haunted it for two years, at first shyly, but then he started conversing and jesting openly with all inhabitants of the house (including the master)."
    (from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hinzelmann)

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    Re: Questions about kobolds and the origins of

    Horray Neil Gaiman. I was about to post that link but you beat me to it.
    kobold \KOH-bold\, noun:
    �In German folklore, a haunting spirit, gnome, or goblin.

    Witch, kobold, sprite. . . and imp of every kind.
    -- A. J. Symington

    This world and the other, too, are always present to his mind, and there in the corner is the little black kobold of a doubt making mouths at him.
    -- James Russell Lowell, Among My Books

    The Kobolds were a species of gnomes, who haunted the dark and solitary places, and were often seen in the mines.
    -- Sir Walter Scott, Letters on Demonology and Witchcraft

    Cobalt, the metal, "the goblin of the mines," was named by those who had to work it after the kobold, since it caused them so much trouble, the ore being arsenical.
    dictionary.com
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    Re: Questions about kobolds and the origins of

    In many german areas where Paganism is still in it's habits partly or totally, we make "Waldgeister" out of Wood or make them into dead or diseased trees.
    Waldgeister means translated Forestspirits.
    They were traditionally made to protect from Trolls and Kobolds. My Family makes them too, everyone of my family has them in the garden.

    They can look like this:








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