Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: The Sacred Plants of our Ancestors

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Last Online
    Saturday, April 21st, 2007 @ 11:09 PM
    Gender
    Politics
    Radical Traditionalist
    Religion
    Pagan
    Posts
    13
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    0
    Thanked in
    0 Posts

    Thumbs Up The Sacred Plants of our Ancestors

    By Christian Rätsch

    The religious experiences of our Germanic-Celtic ancestors were significantly influenced by the considered and responsible use of consciousness-expanding plants. Because these plants made contact with the goddesses, gods, and divinatory beings possible, and revealed the secrets of the universe, they were held in esteem and worshiped as sacred objects. The plants bestowed the people who ingested them visions of a joyful world in which everything was right. The brutal Christianization of Europe robbed Europeans of their sacred knowledge of how to use these plants in meaningful ways. The plants were demonized by the Church and mystical experience was forbidden (Cf. Müller-Ebeling 1991). Today, European culture still suffers from the gaping wound that was ripped open by Christianization. Modern man is uprooted, culturally divided, and lost in a demystified universe that seems meaningless. He has forgotten the beneficial use of sacred plants and suffers from the uncontrolled abuse of alcohol, tobacco, barbiturates, and other substances. Perhaps the time has come to honor our ancestors and to once more place our trust in the protection of sacred plants.
    [/FONT]
    The Way the Plants are Used Determines Their Effect

    The earth provides humans with everything they need. It offers them plants that nourish, heal, stimulate, or intoxicate. Certain plants can be used raw, others must be prepared. Often the preparation of a plant is complicated and demands knowledge, experience, and technology. Many plants are suited only as food when they are prepared by cooking or juicing. Some commonly eaten plants can be fatally toxic if prepared in the wrong manner. Someone who eats raw potatoes, for example, will be ingesting a very dangerous poison. But those who know how to prepare potatoes will not poison themselves.

    This holds even truer with medicinal plants than with plants used for food. In the hands of an inexperienced person, foxglove (Digitalis purpurea) is a terrible, deadly poison, but in the hands of experienced doctors and herbalists, digitalis preparation have already saved the lives of thousands of people suffering from heart problems. Nearly every medicinal plant can be medicinal or poisonous—sometimes fatally so—depending on the dosage. To be able to use medicinal plants in a wise and truly healing way demands superior expertise concerning application, dosage, and the spectrum of effects. If medicinal plants are used incorrectly, they can do more harm than good (Storl 1986). The same is true for intoxicating or psychedelic plants that expand consciousness. To use these naturally intoxicating plants in a wise and beneficial manner demands the most precise knowledge of preparation and dosage, as well as thorough experience so that the desired effect occurs at the right place and at the right time (Zinberg 1984).

    Evidence for the wise use of intoxicating and psychedelic plants has been established as early as the Neolithic period. The disastrous abuse of plant drugs is a manifestation of recent centuries. The sacred or ritual use of such plant drugs has existed in nearly all cultures throughout the history of the human race (McKenna 1992). The inherent powers, which expanded consciousness and triggered mystical experiences, caused them to be seen as “plants of the gods,” “plant teachers,” and “magical plants” (Rätsch 1988; Schultes and Hofmann 1979).

    In the Rig Veda, the most ancient written source of the religion of the Aryans and the Indo-European tribes who settled in the Indus Valley, hundreds of songs are sung about the mystical and wondrous effects of the sacrificial drink soma. The soma ritual was quite simple, but all the more potent as a result. It was said that under the guidance of the divine soma drink the creation of the universe could be relived in a mystical way and one could understand oneself as a part of the whole. For this the people gathered together in a circle, lit an altar fire, and sacrificed soma to the gods by ingesting the drink. The body was considered to be the Vedic temple, which was filled and illuminated by the gods incarnated in the draught. In addition to grain and milk, the beer-like drink contained the juice of the soma plants (which still have not yet been botanically identified). In post-Vedic times, the soma drink was brewed with hashish or other Cannabis products. It was considered a drink of inspiration. The intoxicated artists referred to in the Vedic hymns attest to the mystical experience of cosmic consciousness (Wasson 1968).

    The soma drink of the Aryans corresponds to many intoxicating sacrificial drinks of the Indo-European peoples (Huber 1929; Wohlberg 1990). The Zoroastrian Persians (the ancient Parsi) knew the drink haoma, which was brewed with ephedra (Ephedra sp.) rue (Peganum harmala), and pomegranate (Punicum grantum) (Flattery and Schwartz 1989). The ancient Greeks drank ambrosia, nectar, and kykeon—the initiation drink of the Elusinian mysteries (Wasson et al. 1984). The Thracians became intoxicated on oat beer and wine in which mushrooms had been soaked. The Celts worshipped a magical cauldron that contained the mead of poetry (Maurizio 1933). All of these heathen sacrificial drinks were brewed with the addition of plant drugs (hemp, mushrooms, opium, nightshade plants, etc.), the uses of which are currently subject to laws and regulations. Why were the intoxicating plants of our Indo-European ancestors sacred, and why are they demonized and illegal today? Apparently people back then knew better than they do now how to handle—that is, how to beneficially make use of—consciousness-expanding drugs.

    Like many archaic peoples and tribal cultures, our Celtic-Germanic ancestors recognized, cultivated, and integrated the basic human need for intoxication and mystical experience into their lives in a meaningful way (Siegel 1989; Weil 1986). They knew about the divine origins of intoxicating plants and drinks: “Mead itself, which dropped down like heavenly dew from the world tree, was, for the Germanic peoples, the symbol of the drink of the gods” (Delorez 1963: 23).

    Our ancestors recognized the cosmic significance of this means of intoxication. It was to open the human being to the fairy world, to raise the rainbow bridge to Valhalla, the fortress of the gods, and offer them sanctuary in a clear, magical, and mystical universe. For this reason the secrets of the sacred plants were guarded by wise women, seeresses, prophets, magicians, priests, and Druids. Sacred drinks were not drunk like the nightly beer in front of the television, but rather as part of communal rituals on special occasions in an extraordinary environment, in order to glimpse into the beyond—to see the gods (Rätsch 1990).

    In the folklore of northern Germany, the belief
    arose that witches drank beer at their gatherings.
    (“Witches’ Supper,” woodcut by Ulrich Molitoris, 1489)

    During the libational ceremonies of the Germanic peoples, the sacred beverage (mead or beer) that had been brewed specifically for the festival was passed around to the circle of participants in large drinking horns decorated with mythical motifs. The priest or chieftain took the horn and drank to the gods, offered some of the liquid to the earth, and sprinkled a few drops to the heavens. He thanked Wotan [Odin], the god of ecstasy and the lord of magical drinks. He called to the ancestors and the heroes who founded the culture of the humans, and wished his tribe peace, well being, and health. Then he passed the horn along. The next round he toasted again to the gods, to friends, or to special ancestors, and passed the horn again, further and further around the circle, until it was empty. As soon as it was, a refilled horn was brought, passed around the circle, and drained—until all the participants in the circle were communally and concurrently intoxicated and the gods descended among the humans (Gaeßner 1941).

    Sacred plants were not only used to flavour the sacrificial drink; they were also used in divination and rune oracles. In late Antiquity the figure of the Germanic seeress (called in Old Norse a seiðkona or völva), was already known for her wondrous abilities throughout Europe and beyond its borders (one was even active in Egypt!). These seeresses—of whom Albruna and Weleda are two famous examples—fell into a prophetic trance with the help of such magical substances and shamanic techniques (Delorez). Sacred plants were used in medicine to exorcise harmful spirits, that is, to heal insanity and madness. Other plants were used to increase the fertility of humans, animals, and fields. Love potions were not reprehensible, but instead something sacred, for they could help to spur forth creation.
    Henbane and True Beer
    Black henbane (Hyoscyamus niger) contains various tropane alkaloids that can lead to extreme changes in consciousness (euphoria, hallucination, trance, delirium). These powerful characteristics have been recognized by all peoples and thus henbane has been considered a “plant of the gods” since very early times (Heiser 1987). Today henbane—known in the German vernacular as Prophetenkraut (prophet’s herb), Zauberkraut (magic herb), or Nifelkraut (fog herb)—is one of the rare, and therefore protected plants of Europe. It is more commonly found in the warmer Mediterranean-type climates of countries such as Greece, Portugal, and Spain. In Germany and Denmark it rarely ever appears anymore. It is still occasionally found in Norway. It prefers loamy, nitrogen-rich soil in remote areas, and is often located growing near cultic sites and in the vicinity of convent ruins. Because of its scarcity, the Germanic peoples cultivated henbane in gardens (Höfler 1990). Famous henbane gardens were grown in places whose current names still attest to their former status: Pilsensee (henbane lake), in the regions of Bilsengarten (henbane garden) and Bilstein (henbane stone), and in the Czech city of Pilsen (henbane).[2] The pre-Indo-European natives of the Alps knew of henbane. They placed the small, strongly intoxicating henbane seeds in the urns of their deceased tribal brothers and sisters (Graichen 1988: 69). Henbane was also well known to the Celts. They called it Belinuntia or Beleño, names which indicate it was sacred to Bel, the god of the sun, oracles, and medicine. The Gaelic Celts also used the herb in the preparation of arrow poison and for the killing of the elders, which is where the German common name Altsitzerherb (an herb for Altsitzer, or those who can no longer work and are dependant upon others) comes from. At their own request, aged and frail people were sent first on a trip, and then to the beyond, with a brew of henbane (Höfler 1990).

    Black Henbane, an ingredient in true pilsner.
    (Engraving, nineteenth century)

    The Germanic peoples used henbane for magical and religious rituals, medicine, and love magic. The consciousness-altering powers of the herb were so skillfully employed that, depending on what was needed, they could lead to insights, healing, or romantic yearnings. When possible, the herb was to be harvested by a naked girl who was consecrated to the magical spirit or divine nature of the plant. Henbane stood under the dominion of the fertility god Donar/Thor (the Romans connected it with their own thunder god, Jupiter). For this reason it was used for weather magic. When the land was suffering from a drought, a stalk of henbane was dipped into a spring. The drops that clung to it were then sprinkled onto the sun-parched earth. Bishop Burchard of Worms (ca. 965–1025) described a heathen henbane weather magic ritual of the tenth century:

    During a period of incessant drought the girls gathered together, stripped one of their playmates naked and searched for belisa (i.e., henbane). The naked girl had to pull it out with her right hand, and it was then bound to the small toe of her right foot. Afterward some of the girls, with sticks in their hands, led the naked one to the nearest stream and sprinkled her with water. Doing this was supposed to call down the desired rain. Then the girl, who had to now walk backwards like a crab, was led back to where they had begun. (Quoted after Bräunlein 1986: 55)

    Henbane’s most important religious role is in the Germanic libational offering to honor the thunder god Donar/Thor. Already in the first century C.E., the Roman historian Tacitus wrote that the Germanic peoples have always been heavy beer drinkers. They drank many different kinds of beer: lighter beer for daily enjoyment, strong beer for the ram and buck sacrifices, heavy Yule beer for the winter solstice. There was also beer for weddings, the harvest, binding ceremonies, and for friendship. The Germanic beers were all top-fermented and brewed without hops. They were brewed with barley malt, bierbrot (bread soaked with water, used to start the fermentation), and honey (Gaeßner 1941). In order to make the brew strong and intoxicating, marsh rosemary (Ledum palustre), bog myrtle (Myrica gale), or above all henbane was added (Maurizio 1933). The name “pilsner,” currently used to denote modern hoppy beer, came from henbane, which was formerly known in German as pilsener krut (henbane herb). Henbane beer was a potent intoxicant, aphrodisiac, and could reveal visions of divine splendour. A beer like this would not make you tired and sleepy, as a hopped beer does. It was stimulating and inspired the imagination, inducing heavenly trips and causing the henbane fairies to introduce themselves. The “true pilsner” is the only beer that makes you thirstier, the more you drink!

    Not Only Rope Got Twisted From Hemp
    Hemp (of which there are three species: Cannabis sativa, Cannabis indica, and Cannabis ruderalis) has been used for around 10,000 years for fiber, food (the seeds and their oil), medicine, and as an intoxicant. It is one of the oldest—perhaps the oldest—cultivated plants of the human race. The drugs derived from hemp (hashish, marijuana) are very mild euphorics. They stimulate the associative imagination and put the user into a euphoric state for 2–3 hours, which is characterized by aphrodisiac feelings and changes in the experience of the time-space continuum.

    The most ancient archeological discovery of hemp seeds (Cannabis sativa) was found at a dig done at the stratum of the hand ceramics culture in Eisenberg near Thuringia (Renfrew 1973: 163). Thus, the earliest evidence of hemp culture (approximately 7,500 years old) is found on the soil of present-day Germany! Hemp has been established as part of Germanic culture from before the fifth century B.C.E. It was cultivated in fields, often together with flax. Hemp was sown, tended, and harvested by women (Höfler 1990: 98). The workings of the love goddess Freya were recognized in hemp. Sowing and harvest were conducted in her honor with an erotic ritual, a Hochzeit—a “high time.”[3] In the feminine flowers lay the eroticizing and love-generating power of Freya (Neményi 1988). Those who became intoxicated from them experienced the sensual joy and aphrodisiac ecstasies of the love goddess. From archeological digs it has been discovered that the Germanic and Celtic tribes were already placing female hemp flowers (marijuana) in the graves of their dead 2,500 years ago (Kessler 1985).
    Germania, the personification of the German revolution
    of 1848, holds a hemp branch and sword.
    (Painting by Philipp Veit, 1848)
    The Garden Poppy’s Got It Most people believe that the poppy (Papaver somniferum) originally came from eastern Asia and that the opium produced from it was a discovery of the Chinese. Both beliefs are incorrect. Poppies were cultivated in the eastern Mediterranean region. Opium was discovered by the Minoans (on Crete) and the ancient Greeks, and used medicinally, ritualistically, and hedonistically in many different ways. Poppies, and the knowledge of how to prepare opium (by making incisions in the immature capsules), came very early to the Celtic-Germanic regions. In the pile dwellings on Lake Constance and in Switzerland (e.g., at Robbenhausen), which date back around 4,500 years, cakes with poppy seeds as well as incised capsules have been found (Seefelder 1987).

    The white garden poppy.
    (Illustration for ”The Herbal” of John Gerard, 1633)

    The Germanic peoples planted poppies in poppy fields or Magenfeldern (stomach fields) which were considered convalescing and healing fields and were known as Odâinsackr (Old Norse, “field of the living”). There Odin/Wotan, the god of healing and ecstasy, practised his greatest marvels. Dissolving all fears, stimulating the imagination, and facilitating psychic abilities, the poppy juice (=opium) also protected one from harmful spirits, blood-sucking vampires, and the mischievous Prussian gnome known as the Nickel-Kobold or Nickelruh (Höfler 1990).

    In our own century, poppy juice dissolved in wine continues to be used in German folk medicine as a remedy for sleep, pain, and anxiety. Perhaps these folk-medicinal uses have their roots in a Germanic drinking tradition in which opium was added to mead.

    The Fruits of the Valkyries
    The atropine-containing belladonna (Atropa belladonna) is kalled tollkirsch (“crazy” or “lusty cherry”) in German. Because it is also known as Wutheere (rage berry) in German (Hirschfeld and Linsert 1930: 157), the intoxicating, hallucinogenic plant is placed under the dominion of Odin, the “raging.” The plant, which causes death in higher doses, is also connected to Odin as the god of death, and to the valkyries as the spirits of death. The beautiful and seductive valkyries were the daughters of Odin and Erda—in other words, of heaven and earth. They were the goddesses of the wind, who carried the souls of heroes who had fallen in battle, or others who had died honourably, to the divine fortress of Valhalla. Those chosen by the valkyries are then allowed to delight and intoxicate themselves with the divine mead until the end of the world, or more precisely, until the cyclical renewal of the universe. In the lower Rhine regions, belladonna is called Walkerbaum (valkyrie tree). It is said that everyone who eats of the berries will fall prey to the valkyries (Perger 1864: 182f). Belladonna is said to open the gateway to Valhalla, thus to an alternative state of consciousness.
    Fly Agaric and Other Flying Mushrooms
    In many German-speaking regions the expression “der hat wohl Narrenschmämme gegessen” (“he must have eaten fool’s mushrooms”) has been preserved into modern times.[4] This refers to someone who has been living out his foolishness, craziness, or insanity. The name is a folkloric memory of that mushrooms exist which can put a normal person into an extraordinary state of consciousness. Many indigenous mushrooms of Europe such as liberty caps (Psilocybe semilanceata) contain the same active ingredients as the famous Mexican magic mushrooms (Psilocybe mexicana) (Hofmann et al. 1963; Jordan 1989). These native European mushrooms are just as capable as the Mexican species of revealing the splendidly colourful visions of a different, higher, or truer reality. They can answer questions, provide solutions, and fill the individual’s life with meaning. But they can also reveal the depths of the individual soul in the form of demons and horrific images. Those who are afraid of themselves are easily made foolish by the mushrooms. Those who wish to further expand themselves will find true allies. We know that the Germanic peoples added mushrooms to their ritual beer or mead (Lohberg 1984: 66). It is only likely that the mushrooms would imbue the drink with power of divine revelation—for those who drank in the circle saw the gods descend among them.
    An age-old connection exists between mushrooms and other realms.
    (Illustration by Edmund Dulac for Shakespeare’s “The Tempest,” 1906)

    We know of one mushroom that was consecrated to Odin, the god of ecstasy: fly agaric (Amanita muscaria). Fly agaric has a very long shamanistic tradition in northern Eurasia. Its intoxicating qualities were used culturally for shamanizing, divination, and dreams (Bauer et al. 1991; Rosenbohm 1991). According to Germanic conceptions, fly agaric arose when Odin rode through the air with his horse on a wild hunt at the time of the winter solstice. The foam from his horse’s nostril fell to the ground, fertilizing and impregnating it. After nine months—thus, at the end of August or beginning of September—the earth bore forth the bright red, phallic fly agaric (Pursey 1977: 80). These mushrooms are able to help the soul to fly, and to bestow it with the visionary gift of the divine. Odin had two ravens who were called “thought” and “memory”. They fed themselves from the mushroom which since Antiquity has been called Rabenbrot (raven’s bread) in German vernacular. Perhaps this mushroom can make the thoughts of our ancestors more understandable, in that it once again sets our suppressed memories free.

    This brief overview should be sufficient to illustrate that the use of mind-altering drugs is not originally “culturally alien” to Europeans. Our ancestors have known them and used them in a meaningful way for centuries. It was only by the suppression of our native tradition that the misuse—in other words, the uprooted use—of psychoactive substances was brought about.

    Published in TYR: Myth—Culture—Tradition Vol. 2, 2003–2004
    (Translated by Annabel Lee)

    An earlier version of this article appeared under the title “Was schon den Alten heilig war” (What Was Already Sacred to the Ancients) in Esotera (10/91). This translation if of a subsequent version, “Die heiligen Pflanzen unserer Ahnen,” which appeared in the Festschrift collected in honor of Albert Hofmann entitled Das Tor zu inneren Räumen: Heilige Pflanzen und psychedelische Substanzen als Quelle spiritueller Inspiration (Gateway to Inner Space: Sacred Plants and Psychedelic Substances as a Source of Spiritual Inspiration), edited by Christian Rätsch (Löhrbach: Edition Rauschkunde, 1996). It appears here by kind permission of the author.

    Translator’s Notes:
    [1] In his Ring Cycle operas based on the Nibelungen stories, Wagner merged aspects of Freia (Freya) and Idunn, the latter of whom was actually the goddess in the ancient Germanic myths who tended the apples of eternal youth.
    [2] Bilsenkraut is the German common name for henbane.
    [3] Hochzeit = marriage or wedding, literally hoch = high, zeit = time.
    [4] Narrenschwämme, literally ”fool’s mushrooms,” is one of the many German common names for fly agaric (Amanita muscaria).

    Sources:
    Bauer, Wolfgang, et al. Der Fliegenpilz: Ein kulturhistorisches Museum (Cologne: Wienand Verlag, 1991).
    Bräunlein, Peter. ”Vom Zauber der Pflanzen in der mitteralterlichen Heilkunst” in the exhibition catalog Kreutter-Kunst (Freiburg: 1986), pp. 55–77.
    Delorez, R. L. M. Götter und Mythen der Germanen (Einsiedeln, Zurich, Cologne: Benziger, 1963).
    Flattery, David S., & Martin Schwartz. Haoma and Harmaline [Near Eastern Studies, vol. 21] (Los Angeles: University of California, 1989).
    Gaeßner, Heinz. Bier und Bierartige Getränke im Germanischem Kulturkreis (Berlin: Veröffentlichungen der Gesellschaft für die Geschichte und Bibliographie des Brauwesens, 1941).
    Graichen, Gisela. Das Kultplatzbuch (Hamburg: Hoffmann & Campe, 1988).
    Heiser, Charles B. The Fascinating World of Nightshades (New York: Dover, 1987).
    Hirschberg, Magnus, and Richard Linsert. Liebesmittel (Berlin: Man Verlag, 1930).
    Höfler, Max. Volksmedizinische Botanik der Germanen (Berlin: VWB, 1990 [reprint from 1908]).
    Hofmann, Albert, et al. ”Présence de la psilocybine dans une espèce européene d’Agaric, le Psilocybe semilanceata Fr. Note(*) de MM” in C. R. Acad. Sc. (Paris: 1963), pp. 10–12.
    Huber, E. Das Trankopfer im Kulte der Völker (Hannover-Kirchrode: Opperman, 1929).
    Jordan, Michael. Mushroom Magic (London: Elm Tree Books, 1989).
    Kessler, Thomas. Cannabis Helvetica (Zurich: Nachtschatten, 1985).
    Lohberg, Rolf. Das große Lexikon vom Bier, 3rd. expanded edition (Stuttgart: Scripta, 1984).
    Maurizio, A. Geschichte der gegorene Getränke (Berlin: Paul Parey, 1933).
    McKenna, Terence. Food of the Gods: The Search for the Original Tree of Knowledge (New York: Bantam, 1992).
    Müller-Ebeling, Claudia. “Wolf und Bilsenkraut, Himmel und Hölle—Ein Beitrag zum Thema Dämonisierung der Nature” in Susanne G. Seiler, ed., Gaia—Das Erwachen der Göttin (Braunschweig: Aurum, 1991), pp 163–182.
    Neményi, Géza von. Heidnische Naturreligion (Bergen an der Dumme: Johanna Bohmeier Verlag, 1988).
    Perger, K. Ritter von. Deutsche Pflanzensagen (Stuttgart and Oehringen: August Shaber, 1864).
    Pursey, Helen L. Die Wundersame Welt der Pilze (Zollikon: Albatross, 1977).
    Rätsch, Christian. Lexikon der Zauberpflanzen aus ethnologischer Sicht (Graz: Akademische Druck- und Verlagsanstalt, 1988).
    Rätsch, Christian. ”Bridges to the Gods: Psychedelic Rituals of Knowledge” in Annali dei Musei civici 6 (1990), pp. 127-138.
    Renfrew, Jane. Paleoethnobotany: The Prehistoric Food Plants of the Near East and Europe (New York: Columbia University Press, 1973).
    Rosenbohm, Alexander. Halluzinogene Drogen im Schamanismus (Berlin: Dietrich Reimer Verlag, 1991)
    Schultes, Richard E., and Albert Hofmann. Plants of the Gods (New York: McGraw Hill, 1979). Revised edition, with Christian Rätsch (Rochester, Vermont: Inner Traditions, 2002).
    Seefelder, Mattias. Opium—Eine Kulturgeschichte (Frankfurt an der Main: Athenäum, 1987)
    Siegel, Ronal K. Intoxication: Life in Pursuit of Artificial Paradise (New York: Dutton, 1989)
    Storl, Wolf-Dieter. Vom rechten Umgang mit heilenden Pflanzen (Freiburg: Hyperion, 1986).
    Wasson, R. Gordon. Soma, the Divine Mushroom of Immortality (New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1968).
    Wasson et al. Der Weg nach Eleusis (Frankfurt on the Main: Insel, 1984).
    Weil, Andrew. The Natural Mind, revised ed. (Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1986).
    Wohlberg, Joseph. “Hoama-Soma in the World of Ancient Greece” in Journal of Psychoactive Drugs 22 (1990), pp. 333-342.
    Zinberg, Norman. Drug, Set, and Setting: The Basis for Controlled Intoxicant Use (New Haven: Yale University Press, 1984).

  2. #2
    Eala Freia Fresena
    "Friend of Germanics"
    Skadi Funding Member

    Ocko's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Last Online
    Monday, July 29th, 2019 @ 12:24 PM
    Status
    Available
    Ethnicity
    Friese
    Ancestry
    Friesland
    Subrace
    Nordid
    Country
    United States United States
    State
    Montana Montana
    Location
    Glacier park
    Gender
    Family
    Married
    Occupation
    selfemployed
    Politics
    rightwing
    Religion
    none/pagan
    Posts
    2,924
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    1
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    22
    Thanked in
    20 Posts
    [ The discussion was moved from this thread: http://forums.skadi.net/showthread.php?t=128962 ]


    Bersekr, you seem to be a Thorsmen. Thor is the God of the warrior and also the God of the beer.

    His tree is the oak. A strong tree which represents a strong 'I'. The tree also provides some medicine against alcoholism.

    The beer in the past was mixed with psychedelic herbs and beside the effects of the alcohol also was a pathway to the God Thor.Until in Germany in the early 15th century christians complained and a purity law was made, which kepts those drugs out of the beer.

    I think drinking is fine just keep some good drugs in it. And be always aware of your deeds.

    I had a time I drank 2 bottles of vine a day and often more. Until I stopped for a whole year. No drop at all. It worked and I broke the habit. Now I drink occasionally and it is fine.

    Just stay around.
    Last edited by Blod og Jord; Monday, November 2nd, 2009 at 05:45 AM. Reason: the moderation note

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Last Online
    Saturday, March 31st, 2018 @ 12:10 AM
    Ethnicity
    Gothic
    Ancestry
    Scandinavia, Britain
    Country
    European Union European Union
    Gender
    Family
    Engaged
    Posts
    677
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    0
    Thanked in
    0 Posts
    I don't think you should tell him to start taking drugs. He (Berserkrgang) doesn't need to delve more deeply into ancient myths about this and that, he needs to be able to function normally and not live after some fantasy-tale.

  4. #4
    Eala Freia Fresena
    "Friend of Germanics"
    Skadi Funding Member

    Ocko's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Last Online
    Monday, July 29th, 2019 @ 12:24 PM
    Status
    Available
    Ethnicity
    Friese
    Ancestry
    Friesland
    Subrace
    Nordid
    Country
    United States United States
    State
    Montana Montana
    Location
    Glacier park
    Gender
    Family
    Married
    Occupation
    selfemployed
    Politics
    rightwing
    Religion
    none/pagan
    Posts
    2,924
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    1
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    22
    Thanked in
    20 Posts
    'the fantasy-tale' as you call it is long proven to be right. One also knows the ingrediences, the herbs which people used.

    The big cauldrons which are found everywhere (the most famous one from Gundestrup) has many religious tales on it. Whether but u like it or not but our ancestors drank a lot

    your judgements come from a certain world view whrbsich is hostile to any ekstatic state.

    I can bring you all the herbs my ancestors used which are psychedelic and which they used for this expressed reason.

    It was in a holistic point of view and mode, were Gods are living being who can be contacted through it.

    For you Gods don't exist, they are fairy tales, lies etc. For me they do exist.

    Therefore my point of view is different then yours.

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Last Online
    Saturday, March 31st, 2018 @ 12:10 AM
    Ethnicity
    Gothic
    Ancestry
    Scandinavia, Britain
    Country
    European Union European Union
    Gender
    Family
    Engaged
    Posts
    677
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    0
    Thanked in
    0 Posts
    Drugs are not good for his body. He should start meditation or yoga or something to find inner peace. Gods or no gods, drugs will not give him health benefits. By the way, can youprovide me any links where I can read about psychadelic drugs in Germanic traditions, I have not heard about this.

    Edit: I googled the Gundestrup cauldron and I couldn't find any info about historical proof that this cauldron was used to cook herbs.

    Edit2: If you are referring to drugs that won't affect his health in a negative way, then I don't oppose it. I know herbs have been used widely in many traditions, but drugs/herbs that are known to cause harm should be avoided IMO even if they may have been used in som culture.

  6. #6
    Eala Freia Fresena
    "Friend of Germanics"
    Skadi Funding Member

    Ocko's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Last Online
    Monday, July 29th, 2019 @ 12:24 PM
    Status
    Available
    Ethnicity
    Friese
    Ancestry
    Friesland
    Subrace
    Nordid
    Country
    United States United States
    State
    Montana Montana
    Location
    Glacier park
    Gender
    Family
    Married
    Occupation
    selfemployed
    Politics
    rightwing
    Religion
    none/pagan
    Posts
    2,924
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    1
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    22
    Thanked in
    20 Posts
    It's from the Book: 'Die Pflanzen der Kelten'
    (the plants of the Celts, Storl)

    He has all the references, mentionings in ancient books, customs used to these days and on and on.

    If it is wished, I can write an exerpt on that, with the proofs he gives.



    He is an anthropologist gone natural
    Last edited by Ocko; Sunday, November 1st, 2009 at 09:46 PM. Reason: typo

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Last Online
    Saturday, March 31st, 2018 @ 12:10 AM
    Ethnicity
    Gothic
    Ancestry
    Scandinavia, Britain
    Country
    European Union European Union
    Gender
    Family
    Engaged
    Posts
    677
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    0
    Thanked in
    0 Posts
    With all respect, but this is a Germanic forum. I would like not to know what the Celts used, but what a good source for what herbs the Germanics used. It would be interesting to know what people used what herbs, for example shamans and warriors, and common people.

    They put herbs in the beer so that they could preserve the beer easier, most people probably didn't oppose the ban of herbs. Herbs can have negative side effects, that's why they banned them, nowadays we have other ways to preserve beer in a good condition. Today science shows what good and what bad herbs do to the human body, that's why we go to our modern day medicine men (doctors), just like the people did back then. What some Celts or Germanics ate 2,000 yeras ago shouldn't guide an alcoholic today. Just because some herbs helped you doesn't mean it will help him, you are no medicine man. If I was a cocainist, I'd probably say "Do cocaine, it's great!". So a doctor probably would be more wise to visit.
    Last edited by Blod og Jord; Monday, November 2nd, 2009 at 05:38 AM. Reason: copied from different thread

  8. #8
    Eala Freia Fresena
    "Friend of Germanics"
    Skadi Funding Member

    Ocko's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Last Online
    Monday, July 29th, 2019 @ 12:24 PM
    Status
    Available
    Ethnicity
    Friese
    Ancestry
    Friesland
    Subrace
    Nordid
    Country
    United States United States
    State
    Montana Montana
    Location
    Glacier park
    Gender
    Family
    Married
    Occupation
    selfemployed
    Politics
    rightwing
    Religion
    none/pagan
    Posts
    2,924
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    1
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    22
    Thanked in
    20 Posts
    His book is about celtic influences in modern and medivial Germany. He focuses on the plantuse but as well as the standing of plants in celtic and as well germanic culture.

    there are so many overlapping uses of plants that it is not really distinguishable.

Similar Threads

  1. What are the Top 10 Plants in your Garden?
    By SpearBrave in forum Self-Reliance, Off Grid, & Gardening
    Replies: 48
    Last Post: Wednesday, June 27th, 2012, 05:49 PM
  2. Gardening with Heirloom Plants
    By Vindefense in forum Self-Reliance, Off Grid, & Gardening
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: Friday, March 12th, 2010, 06:05 AM
  3. Plants Have Feelings Too(?)
    By TisaAnne in forum Natural Sciences & Environment
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: Tuesday, August 9th, 2005, 08:12 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •