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Thread: The Swastika (Fyrfos)

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    You are not wrong, who deem / That my days have been a dream Johannes de León's Avatar
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    The Swastika (Fyrfos)

    The swastika (Sanskrit "good luck" or "well-being", literally "it is good"). The name and first use of the swastika was first mentioned in the Vedas, the holy texts of Hinduism. However, while its name is Vedic, it appears in art and design throughout human history, symbolising many different things; such as luck, Brahma, the Hindu concept of samsara, or Surya (the sun).


    In Hinduism, the two symbols represent the two forms of Brahma; clockwise it represents the evolution of the universe (Pravritti), anti-clockwise it represents the involution of the universe (Nivritti). It is also seen as pointing in all four direction (North, East, South and West) and thus signifies stability and groundedness. Its use as a sun symbol can first be seen in its representation of Surya, the Hindu lord of the Sun. It is used as a good-luck symbol.

    However, it is also seen as a power symbol, and alternate forms that reflect the shape of a man are popular. It is used in all Hindu yantras and religious designs till today. All over the subcontinent of India it can be seen on the sides of temples and on religious scripture to gift items and letterhead. The Swastika is considered extremely holy and auspicious by all Hindus, and is regularly used to decorate all sorts of items to do with Hindu culture. The Hindu God Ganesh is closely associated with the symbol of the swastika. Its use is still widespread in India.

    In Buddhism, the swastika is oriented horizontally. These two symbols are included, at least since the Liao dynasty, as part of the Chinese language (as 卍 (in pinyin: wan4), the symbolic sign for the character 萬 (wan4) meaning "all", and "eternality" and as 卐 which is seldom used.) The swastikas (in either direction) appear on the chest of some statues of Gautama Buddha. Because of the association with the right facing swastika with Nazism, Buddhist swastikas after the mid 20th century are almost universially left facing. This form of the swastika is often found on Chinese food packaging to signify that the product is vegetarian and can be consumed by strict Buddhists. Also this type of swastika is often sewn into the collars of Chinese children's clothing to protect them from evil spirits.

    In Jainism, the swastika symbol is combined with that of a hand.

    In Christianity, it has been used as an alternative to the traditional cross. It also symbolizes the pain of Christ on the cross.

    The Swastika is found all over Hindu temples, signs, altars, pictures and iconography in India, both from the past and today. The swastika symbol was found extensively in the ruins of the ancient city of Troy.

    In Ireland, a variant of the swastika known as Brigit's cross is used to ward off evil.

    In the West, the Swastika is most easily identified as the symbol of the Nazis, who believed that the early Aryans of India, from whose Vedic tradition the swastika sprang, were the prototypical white invaders, and thus saw fit to co-opt the sign as a symbol of white unity. It has come to signify fascism outside of India due to its history in World War II.

    The swastika is common as a design motif in current Hindu architecture and Indian artwork, as well as in ancient architecture, frequently appearing in mosaics, friezes, and other works across the ancient world. Related symbols in classical Western architecture include the cross, the gammadion, the three-legged triskele or triskelion and the rounded lauburu. The swastika symbol is also known in these contexts by a number of names including fylfot (in English) and gammadion (in Greece). The name usually given to the swastika in classical contexts of the West is the Greek key.

    Geometrically, the swastika is an irregular icosagon, a 20-sided polygon.

    Traditionally, when the swastika is drawn facing right handed or clockwise as above, it is a good luck symbol. It is sometimes claimed when it is drawn left facing or counterclockwise, it is a bad omen and it is labelled a "sauwastika". However, there is little evidence of this distinction in Hindu history from which it is derived. Hindus all over India still use the symbol in both representations for the sake of balance, although the standard form is the left-facing swastika; Buddhists almost always use the left facing swastika.

    In the early twentieth century, a right facing swastika which is rotated through 45 degrees, was used as the symbol of German Will by the NSDAP, and it is still closely associated, in the West, with this use. In modern times, the symbolism of the Nazi swastika has been used by neo-Nazis and other hate groups. Because of this, its use outside historical contexts has become a taboo in much of the world. However, it is important to bear in mind that for many hundreds of millions of people worldwide, the swastika has associations which have nothing to do with Nazism and hence is still in common use in primarily non-Western countries.

    In Japan, the swastika, called "manji", is an ancient religious symbol. A manji appeared on a certain Pokémon playing card sold in Japan. Because of its resemblance to the Nazi swastika (see below), the card was altered for Western translations. On Japanese town plans, a swastika (left-facing and horizontal) is commonly used to mark the location of a Buddhist temple.

    In heraldry, a figure identical to the swastika is called the fylfot. It predates and has nothing to do with Nazism or anti-Semitism.

    Prior to the creation of the Nazi movement, the swastika was already in use as a symbol of German volkisch nationalist movements. The Nazi Party took the swastika in a white circle on a red background, as its insignia in 1920. The swastika is known in this context as the Hakenkreuz ("hooked cross"). The Nazis also used the swastika without the circle and background. Adolf Hitler stated in Mein Kampf that he chose the final design of the Nazi flag based on a large number of submissions from Nazi supporters.

    Unlike the traditional swastika, the Nazi swastika is almost invariably depicted at 45° to the horizontal. Two versions of the Nazi swastika commonly occur, one with outer bars pointed counter-clockwise, and the mirror image with outer bars pointed clockwise. Although the Nazis do not appear to have made a symbological distinction between the two, the latter is more common in their usage. The use of the swastika was associated by Nazi theorists with their theories of Aryan cultural descent of the German people.
    .

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    Senior Member Moody's Avatar
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    Post Re: The Swastika

    When I first glanced at the Old English word 'Fylfot' I jumped to the [dyslexic]conclusion that it meant something like 'Fly Foot', thinking of the hooks of the swastika flying around the centre-point; this was WRONG!
    It is actually 'FILL Foot', and seems to mean, rather mundanely, that the symbol was used to 'fill'-in at the bottom, or 'foot', of window decorations!

    Swastika link;
    http://www.swastika-info.com/en/bedeutung.php

    Why are there beings at all, & why not rather nothing?
    [Leibniz/Heidegger]

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    Post Re: The Swastika

    I've seen the swastika as the central symbol on the flag of medieval Serbian emperor Dushan. Unfortunately, I saw it once on TV, and I couldn't find any other picture on the internet or in literature ( probably because it too was deemed inappropriate ).

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    Post Re: The Swastika

    I had a picture of Persepolis. You can see on this picture that Persepolis is build by a Swastika formation!

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    Post Re: The Swastika

    By the way:



    On this picture you can see the Derafsh-e Kaviyani as the Iranian national symbol and the Iranian eagle. Later by Germans Reichsadler.
    The Swastika was also in use on banners!

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    Account Inactive friedrich braun's Avatar
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    Origins of the swastika

    Origins of the swastika

    The EU has been urged to ban the swastika because of its Nazi associations with hate and racism. But the symbol was around long before Adolf Hitler.
    The swastika is a cross with its arms bent at right angles to either the right or left. In geometric terms, it is known as an irregular icosagon or 20-sided polygon.

    The word is derived from the Sanskrit "svastika" and means "good to be". In Indo-European culture it was a mark made on people or objects to give them good luck.

    It has been around for thousands of years, particularly as a Hindu symbol in the holy texts, to mean luck, Brahma or samsara (rebirth). It can be clockwise or anti-clockwise and the way it points in all four directions suggests stability. Sometimes it features a dot between each arm.


    Nowadays it is commonly seen in current and ancient Hindu architecture and Indian artwork, including the ruins of the ancient city of Troy. It has also been used in Buddhism and Jainism, plus other Asian, European and Native American cultures.
    The British author Rudyard Kipling, who was strongly influenced by Indian culture, had a swastika on the dust jackets of all his books until the rise of Nazism made this inappropriate. It was also a symbol used by the scouts in Britain, although it was taken off Robert Baden-Powell's 1922 Medal of Merit after complaints in the 1930s.

    It is rarely seen on its own in Western architecture, but a design of interlocking swastikas is part of the design of the floor of the cathedral of Amiens, France.

    Nazi's hooked cross s

    Swastika is also a small mining town in northern Ontario, Canada, about 580 kilometres north of Toronto. Attempts by the government of Ontario to change the town's name during World War II were rejected by residents.

    But it is its association with the National Socialist German Workers Party in the 1930s which is etched on the minds of Western society. Before Hitler, it was used in about 1870 by the Austrian Pan-German followers of Schoenerer, an Austrian anti-Semitic politician.

    Its Nazi use was linked to the belief in the Aryan cultural descent of the German people. They considered the early Aryans of India to be the prototypical white invaders and hijacked the sign as a symbol of the Aryan master race.

    The Nazi party formally adopted the swastika - what they called the Hakenkreuz, the hooked cross - in 1920. This was used on the party's flag (right), badge, and armband.

    In Mein Kampf, Adolf Hitler wrote: "I myself, meanwhile, after innumerable attempts, had laid down a final form; a flag with a red background, a white disk, and a black swastika in the middle. After long trials I also found a definite proportion between the size of the flag and the size of the white disk, as well as the shape and thickness of the swastika."


    Story from BBC NEWS:
    http://news.bbc.co.uk/go/pr/fr/-/2/h...ne/4183467.stm

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    Senior Member bruno's Avatar
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    The Swastika

    It happens often to read fanciful interpretations of the swastika. As a matter of fact its origin and its mean are enough clear. In the Latin literature there is a verse of GEORGICS (1,30), in which Virgil makes reference to the ultima Thyle, i.e. the last Thule. The more probable meaning is than this name just holds of the Nordic origin of the Aryan nations as therefore is shown from the Tilak in his THE ARCTIC HOME IN THE VEDAS. Consequently, in order to inquire around that remote time, the most ancient language to which we can refer today is only the Sanskrit. In skr. tula is the balance: Ö tul, to lift up, raise, to determine the weight of anything by lifting it up; from which the lt. tollo and also gr. talanton, to weigh. The present Ursa Mayor and the Ursa Minor were thus called because the two constellations hinges upon the Polar Star like the plates of a scales. Only in the times subsequent to the displacement towards South of the Aryans, the name [Libra] was transferred to a zodiacal asterism. For elementary cognitions of astronomical geography is common knowledge that the turning in the polar sky of the two aforesaid asterisms, give a complete anticlockwise rotation in the course of the day. A spin plastically represented from the swastika. At those high latitudes is so marked, to every turn, the transit from a day to the other. Well, in skr. swastika - that it is of for himself sign of good luck - it can become, if they are used the Asoka characters, the monogram of sw-astì whose sense is rendered from the blessing “ may it be well with the thee! ”. If then we take the composed substantive swastivâcana, we find that it is be a matter of <<a religious rite… performed by… invoking blessings by repetition of certain Mantras>> (M. Moniers Williams Dictionary). The Asoka’s characters (- 272/-231) are also coll brâhmî and because they look very geometric, a type of graphic compositions like swastika is really easy. In our millennial perspective, other interesting element is the antiquity of the brâhmî. The beginning of its use comes, in fact, placed around to V sec. b.C. but it could go more back as well as is authoritatively affirmed by Sir A.Cunningham and John Dowson to the point of the descent of the brâhmî from a old aboriginal writing.

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    Senior Member NatRev's Avatar
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    Swastika

    This is actually an old thread I started a year or so back on the Vampire Freaks goth web site under the Pagan Pride forum so if this does sound familiar then yeah, it's a repeat.

    Anyway, my original post went along the lines that I had just visited a stately home with my family and noticed that some useless idiot had scratched in a crudely drawn swastika on a wall.

    Frankly I loathe vandalism and absolutely hate the misuse of the swastika, as to me I see it as perhaps the most holiest of symbols. In actual fact, sometimes I call it a 'sonnekreuz', sun cross.

    I am not interested in the modern racial connestion to this symbol as to me it is about life. I see the swastika as a symbol of the sun, the galaxy, the whole cosmic circle of creation/destruction/creation etc... life, death, rebirth... Brahma, Vishnu, Kali, Brahma if you will.

    The swastika represents, (to me) the unstoppable momentum of the Universe, the perpertual movement of it, for without movement, there is no life.

    In short, I LOVE the swastika. Of course in this modern age, it has been misused and misunderstood that any sane person wouldn't dare wear one in public, but I just wondered what other peoples views are.

    Sacred symbol that should be associated with pride?

    Racist symbol that IS assocaited with hate?

    "Only through a re-integration of Humanity into the whole of Nature can our People be made stronger."

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    Quote Originally Posted by NatRev
    Sacred symbol that should be associated with pride?

    Racist symbol that IS assocaited with hate?
    To me it is certainly the first, but also a racist symbol that is also associated with pride, as well as strength, unity and love.
    The Hindu religion and Buddhist offshoot are 2 of the more pleasant forms of world religion and in a room in my house I have a large swastika-type hanging on the wall handmade by Tibetan monks. It's even in my favourite colour!

    Want a peek? Oh, go on then...

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    Senior Member Sifsvina's Avatar
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    That is a particually beautiful one NatRev!
    Pride (love) not Hate! Sacred or racial it is an ulifting symbol. I adore the Sonnekreuz! It stirs something particularly strong in me. It is the very movement of life, stregnth, the natural cycle of life moving forward, an upwelling of the truth that is. It's pretty:-)

    Unfortunatly I don't feel comfortable wearing swastikas outright but I love to wear and use things that have subtle ones on them. A properly done sheild knot has one at the center, they can can be part of a fabric, trim, or knitted pattern.

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