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Thread: The Evolution of Mammalian Gene Families

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    Re: The evolution of mammalian gene families

    Interesting to see this sort of thing applied to taxonomical questions. I'd like to see something more detailed however.
    When I was little, I had a Purnell's Prehistoric Atlas, with a chart of the interrelatedness of all the Mammalian orders and suborders. I understood at the time that a lot of this was still rather hypothetical, and the 'best guess', but now it seems such ambiguity is past. Does anyone know of such an updated chart, showing the dates of separation of the types?

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    Our results imply that humans and chimpanzees differ by at least 6% (1,418 of 22,000 genes) in their complement of genes, which stands in starkcontrast to the oft-cited 1.5% difference between orthologous nucleotide sequences. This genomic “revolving door” of gene gain and loss represents a large number of genetic differences separating humans from our closest relatives.
    Hopefully, this is because the multigene family approach described in this article has provided better phylogenetic resolution.

    Perhaps this approach will be used by other researchers to examine deep phylogenetic relationships and elucidate many other questions that still remain at higher systematic levels.

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