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Thread: Your Favourite Germanic Historical Battle?

  1. #21
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    Re: Which battle are you most proud from your nation's history?

    The Battle of the Teutoburg Forest

    In the battle of the Teutoburg Forest in authumn 9 a. y. p. s., three Roman legions and their lackeys, lead by Publius Varus, were defeated and wiped out by an alliance of Germanics under the leadership of Irmin (Arminius, Hermann).

    The battle made an end to the attempts to occupy and to integrate the Germanic territories to the East of the Rhine into the Roman Empire. As a result, the Germanics were left to themselves and were not incorporated into the Roman culture area. This was the basic condition for the shaping and the development of an independent Germania whose effects can still be observed in our times.

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    Senior Member Japetos's Avatar
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    Re: Which battle are you most proud from your nation's history?

    I'm not proud from anyone's history.
    I hope I'll be proud from the realization of my comrades' politics on the future.

  3. #23
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    Re: Which battle are you most proud from your nation's history?

    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscripti catapultas habebunt.

    « -Oh my God, but you're a neo-nazi?!...
    -But why neo? »

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    Senior Member Sigurd Volsung's Avatar
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    Re: Which battle are you most proud from your nation's history?

    The Battle of Agincourt
    25th October 1415


    Combatants

    England vs. France.

    Commanders

    Henry V of England vs. Charles d'Albret.

    Strength

    England: Around 6,000
    France: Between 20,000-30,000

    Results

    Decisive English victory.

    The Battle of Agincourt was fought on 25 October 1415 (Saint Crispin's Day), in northern France as part of the Hundred Years' War. The combatants were the English army of King Henry V and that of Charles VI of France. The latter was commanded not by the incapacitated king himself, but by the Constable Charles d'Albret and various prominent French noblemen of the Armagnac party. The battle is notable for the use of the English longbow, which helped the English compensate for their inferior numbers. The battle was also immortalised (and somewhat fictionalised) by William Shakespeare as the centrepiece of his play Henry V.

    At dawn, both Henry and d'Albret laid out their forces near their respective camps. To start, the lines were a little over a mile apart. The plain between the armies was a gently rolling field, freshly plowed and planted, about 900 yards wide. It had been raining continuously for two weeks, and the field was a sea of mud.

    The French had two very dense lines of armored foot soldiers with crossbowmen and bombards between. Mounted knights guarded the flanks and formed a reserve in the rear. d'Albret's plan was to use the bombards to cut the English lines into smaller sections that could be handled individually. Unfortunately, everybody (including d'Albret!) wanted to be in the front line. It got so dense that the bombards couldn't be fired, as they would hit more French than English. They actually were fired once, to no effect.

    Henry laid out his forces in the traditional English fashion, with men-at-arms flanked by wedges of archers, protected by large pointed stakes. (Horses won't charge at big pointy things.) The archers at the ends of the lines were positioned forward from the rest of the troops to give covering fire along the main front. This is an excellent defensive position, but it gives very little scope for attack.
    After the forces were arranged, they sat and stared at each other for four hours. The English had no desire to attack, and the French were presumably not pleased at the idea of wading through a mile of mud.

    About 11 AM, as some of the French were sending their servants back to camp to bring lunch, Henry decided to force the issue. He ordered his troops to move the line forward, and to reset the positions within extreme longbow range from the French lines. He didn't have enough men-at-arms to form a reserve or to guard the camp. This was to have dramatic consequences later on.

    As Henry had planned, the first volley of arrows goaded the French into attacking. The first attack was from the mounted knights on the flanks of the French position, intending to overrun the longbowmen protecting the English flanks. It was a disaster. While an English arrow would not normally penetrate a knight's plate armor, a horse cannot carry enough armor to be effective. Wounded horses threw their riders into the mud and trampled through the close-packed ranks of French foot soldiers. They also churned up the mud in front of the English positions, making things more difficult for future French attacks.

    The main French attack was from the first line of men-at-arms. Unfortunately, everybody tried to push their way into the first line, including Constable d'Albret. As they marched toward the English, their line was squeezed together by the narrowing field, until they were so close together that they couldn't lift their arms to use their weapons. However, even with the mud and the crowding, the shock of the French men-at-arms hitting the English line was terrific, throwing the lines back for several yards.

    It was, however, ineffectual. Despite some terrific fighting, the English line was never in any serious danger. While men-at-arms in plate armor are normally quite mobile, the combination of the mud and the crowding made them almost helpless. The English simply knocked them down, to drown or suffocate under fallen bodies.
    The second line of men-at-arms followed the first. Now, however, there was the added complication that the English positions were blocked by a wall of bodies. The second line had no better luck against the arrows, mud, and English men-at-arms than the first.

    After the collapse of the second line, the English common soldiers started in on the traditional battlefield activity of taking prisoners for rensom and stripping the armor and jewelry from the dead. However, the remaining French forces, both the survivors of the first two lines and the entire third line, plus the crossbowman, easily outnumbered the English. As the counts of Marle and Fauquembergues tried to rally the French for a third attack, Henry gave the order to kill the prisoners. This removed the risk of the prisoners turning on their captors and freed their guards for duty elsewhere.

    At roughly the same time, a group of French knights cut through the woods and attacked the English camp. In Shakespeare, the raid on the camp was Henry's reason for ordering the prisoners killed; I suspect that it was a later justification. Remember, the murdered prisoners represented a very large amount of ransom money, which Henry needed very badly.

    The attack of Marle and Fauquembergues was defeated with no particular effort. Their charge (in which both of them were killed) was the last offensive action that the French mounted.




    Key
    English Longbowmen

    English Men at Arms

    First French Attack

    Second French Attack

    French Mounted Knights

    French Crossbowmen

    French Men at Arms

    French Bombards




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    Re: Which battle are you most proud from your nation's history?

    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscripti catapultas habebunt.

    « -Oh my God, but you're a neo-nazi?!...
    -But why neo? »

  6. #26
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    Grin Re: Which battle are you most proud from your nation's history?

    Thanks to everyone for reminding me of a number of history changing battles!

    Im proudest of the Battle of Bloodriver 1838 (one of my ancestors fought in this battle when he was 16 years old), although there are a number of battles in which the Boers tought the British soldiers a few lessons like: Majuba, Magersfontein and Spionkop.

    Numbers:
    Boers: 470
    Zulus: 10 000 - 20 000
    Boers Killed: none (3 lightly wounded)
    Zulus Killed: 3 000+

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Blood_River

    The Battle of Blood River (Afrikaans: Slag van Bloedrivier) was fought on 16 December 1838 on the banks of the Blood River (Bloedrivier) in what is today KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. A group of about 470 Voortrekkers, led by Andries Pretorius, defended a laager (circle of ox wagons) against Zulu impis, ruled by King Dingane and led by Dambuza (Nzobo) and Ndlela kaSompisi, numbering between 10 and 20 thousand.

    The Voortrekkers were motivated by the fact that Dingane had killed one of their leaders, Piet Retief, after negotiating a treaty with him. Dingane's impis had also afterwards gone on a slaughtering campaign, killing defenseless Voortrekker women and smashing their babies against rocks, most notably at Bloukrans.

    On 15 December the Voortrekkers received word that a large Zulu force was approaching. Pretorius chose an excellent site next to the Blood river (then the Ncome river), where their ox wagons were arranged into a laager. In spite of mist settling that evening, it was clear the next day. Before the battle commenced, the Voortrekkers (led by Sarel Cilliers) made a vow to God that, should they be delivered, they would build a church and commemorate the day as a Sabbath.

    The Zulus repeatedly and unsuccessfully attacked the laager, until Pretorius ordered a group of horse riders to leave the encampment and engage the Zulus. In the fighting, Pretorius was wounded in his left hand by an assegaai (Zulu spear).

    Partly due to the fact that the Voortrekkers used rifles and at least one light cannon against the Zulus' spears, as well as the good location and motivation of the Voortrekkers, only three Voortrekkers were wounded and none perished; that contrasted against the more than 3,000 Zulu warriors who died.

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    Senior Member János Hunyadi's Avatar
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    Re: Which battle are you most proud from your nation's history?

    Quote Originally Posted by Gordost View Post
    FRANCE: The Battle of Tours 732 AD


    http://forums.skadi.net/october_10_7...557#post650557

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    Senior Member János Hunyadi's Avatar
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    Thumbs Up Re: Which battle are you most proud from your nation's history?


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    Re: Which battle are you most proud from your nation's history?

    Battle of Thermopylae, of course.


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    Re: Which battle are you most proud from your nation's history?

    I appreciate the Battle of Hastings from both POVs.




    Fyrdmen and housecarls, learning that their king was dead, began streaming away from the battle; the Normans overran the hilltop in pursuit. Harold's personal guard died fighting to the last as a circle of housecarls around the king's body
    ----------

    Also Rourke's Drift where the British valiantly slew hundreds of Zulus for the loss of 17 killed.

    Battle of Waterloo.

    Battle of Quebec

    Successful defence of Canada from the expansionist American federalists.

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