Full text here : http://vassun.vassar.edu/~sttaylor/Cooley/

The Cattle-Raid of Cooley (Tin B Calnge) is the central epic of the Ulster cycle. Queen Medb of Connaught gathers an army in order to gain possession of the most famous bull in Ireland, which is the property of Daire, a chieftain of Ulster. Because the men of Ulster are afflicted by a debilitating curse, the seventeen-year-old Cuchulain must defend Ulster single-handedly. The battle between Cuchulain and his friend Ferdiad is one of the most famous passages in early Irish literature


Excerpt:
20. The Combat of Ferdiad and Cuchulain Comrac Fir dead inso.
Then the men of Erin took counsel who would be fit to send to the ford to fight and do battle with Cuchulain, to drive him off from them at the morning hour early on the morrow. With one accord they declared that it should be Ferdiad son of Daman son of Dar, the great and valiant warrior of the men of Dornnann. And fitting it was for him to go thither, for well-matched and alike was their manner of fight and of combat. Under the same instructresses had they done skillful deeds of valour and arms, when learning the art with Scathach ('the Modest') and with Uathach ('the Dreadful') and with Aif ('the Handsome'). And neither of them overmatched the other, save in the feat of the Gae Bulga ('the Barbed Spear') which Cuchulain possessed. Howbeit, against this, Ferdiad was horn-skinned when fighting and in combat with a warrior on the ford.
Is and-sin ra imraided oc feraib hErend cia bad chir do chomlond & do chomrac ra Coinculaind ra hair na maitni muchi arna brach. Issed ra raidsetar uile co m-bad Fer diad mac Damain meic Dre, in mlid mrchalma d'feraib Domnand. Daig bha cosmail & bha comadas a comlond & a comrac. Ac oenmummib daronsat ceirdgnimrada gaile & gascid dar a foglaim, ac Scthaig & ac Uathaig & ac ife. Ocus n bi immarcraid neich db ac raile, acht cless in gae bulga ac Coinculaind. Cid ed n ba conganchnessach Fer diad ac comlund & ac comrac ra lech ar th na agid-side.

Then were messengers and envoys sent to Ferdiad. Ferdiad denied them their will, and sent back the messengers, and he went not with them, for he knew wherefore they would have him, to fight and combat with his friend, with his comrade and foster-brother, Cuchulain. Then did Medb despatch the druids and the poets of the camp, the lampoonists and hard-attackers, for Ferdiad, to the end that they might make three satires to stay him and three scoffing speeches against him, that they might raise three blisters on his face, Blame, Blemish and Disgrace, if he came not with them.
Is and-sin ra fittea fessa & techtaireda ar cend Fir diad. Ra rastar & ra eittchestar & ra repestar Fer diad na techta sin, ocus n thnic leo, dig ra fitir an ma-ra-batar d, do chomlond & do chomrac re charait, re chocle & re chomalta, [re Fer n-diad mac n-Damin meic Dre, & n thanic leo]. Is and-sin fitte Medb na drith & na glmma & na cradgressa ar cend Fir diad, ar con derntis tor(a) ara fossaigthe d, & teora glamma dcend, go tcbaits teora bolga bar a agid, ail & anim & athis [mur bud marb a chetir co m-bad marb re cind nomaide], munu thsed.

Ferdiad came with them for the sake of his own honour, forasmuch as he deemed it better to fall by the shafts of valour and bravery and skill, than to fall by the shafts of satire, abuse and reproach. And when Ferdiad was come into the camp, he was honoured and waited on, and choice, well-flavoured strong liquor was poured out for him till he became drunken and merry. Great rewards were promised him if he would make the fight and combat, namely a chariot worth four times seven bondmaids, and the apparel of two men and ten men, of cloth of every colour, and the equivalent of the Plain of Murthemne of the rich Plain of Ai, free of tribute, without duress for his son, or for his grandson, or for his great-grandson, till the end of time and existence.
Tanic Fer diad leo dar cend a enig, daig ba hussu lessium a thuttim do gaib gaile & gascid & engnama n a thuttim de gaaib ire & cnaig & imdergtha. Ocus a daracht, ra fadaiged & ra frithled , ocus ra dled lind sola sochin somesc fair, gor bo mesc medarchin , & ra gelta comada mra d ar in comlond & ar in comrac do denam, i. carpat cethri secht cumal & timthacht da fer dc d'etgud cacha datha, & commit a feraind de mn maige hi, gan chin, (gan chobach, gan dunad, gan sluagad) gan ecendil da mac & d ua & da iarmua go brunni m-brtha & betha, & Findabair d'enmni, & in t-o ir bae i m-brutt Medba fair anas.

Such were the words of Medb, and she spake them here and Ferdiad responded:

Medb: "Great rewards in arm-rings,
Share of plain and forest
Freedom of thy children
From this day till doom!
Ferdiad son of Daman,
More than thou couldst hope for,
Why shouldst thou refuse it,
That which all would take?"
Ferdiad: "Naught I'll take without bond--
No ill spearman am I--
Hard on me to-morrow:
Great will be the strife!
Hound that's hight of Culann,
How his thrust is grievous!
No soft thing to stand him;
Rude will be the wound!"

Medb: "Champions will be surety,
Thou needst not keep hostings.
Reins and splendid horses
Shall be given as pledge!
Ferdiad, good, of battle,
For that thou art dauntless,
Thou shalt be my lover,
Past all, free of cain !"

Ferdiad: "Without bond I'll go not
To engage in ford-feats;
It will live till doomsday
In full strength and force.
Ne'er I'll yield-- who hears me,
Whoe'er counts upon me--
Without sun- and moon-oath,
Without sea and land!"

Medb: "Why then dost delay it?
Bind it as it please thee,
By kings' hands and princes',
Who will stand for thee!
Lo, I will repay thee,
Thou shalt have thine asking,
For I know thou'lt slaughter
Man that meeteth thee!"

Ferdiad: "Nay, without six sureties--
It shall not be fewer--
Ere I do my exploits
There where hosts will be!
Should my will be granted,
I swear, though unequal,
That I'll meet in combat
Cuchulain the brave!"

Medb: "Domnall, then, or Carbr,
Niaman famed for slaughter,
Or e'en folk of barddom,
Natheless, thou shalt have.
Bind thyself on Morann,
Wouldst thou its fulfilment
Bind on smooth Man's Carbr,
And our two sons, bind!"

Ferdiad: "Medb, with wealth of cunning,
Whom no spouse can bridle,
Thou it is that herdest
Cruachan of the mounds!
High thy fame and wild power!
Mine the fine pied satin;
Give thy gold and silver,
Which were proffered me!"

Medb: "To thee, foremost champion,
I will give my ringed brooch.
From this day till Sunday,
Shall thy respite be!
Warrior, mighty, famous,
All the earth's fair treasures
Shall to thee be given;
Everything be thine!

"Finnabair of the champions (?),
Queen of western Erin,
When thou'st slain the Smith's Hound,
Ferdiad, she's thine!"
Is amlaid ra bi Medb g rada, & ra bert na briathra and & ra recair Fer diad:

M.Rat fia lach mr m-buinne
ra[t] chuit maige is chaille,
ra sire do chlainne
andiu co t brth.
A Fir diad meic Damin [eirggi guin is gabail]
attetha as cech anil.
Cid dait gan a gabil
an gabas cch.
F. d. Ni gb-sa gan rach,
dig nim lech gan lmach,
bhud tromm form imbrach
bud fortrn in feidm.
C dn comainm Culand,
is amnas inn urrand,
n furusa a fulang,
bud tairpech in teidm.

M. Rat fat lich rat lma,
no co raga ar dla,
srin ocus eich na
ra bhertar rit lim.
A Fir-diad inn ga,
dig isat duni dna,
dam-sa bat fer grda,
sech cch gan nach cin.

F. d. Ni rag-sa gan rtha
do chluchi na n-tha,
meraid coll m-brtha,
go bruth is co m-brg.
Noco gb, ge sti,
ge ra beth dom resci,
gan grin ocus sci
la muir ocus tr.

M.Ga chan duit a fuirech
naisc-siu, gor bat bidech,
for deiss rig is ruirech,
doragat rat lim.
Fuil sund nachat tuilfea,
rat fa cach n chungfea,
dig ra fess co mairbfea
in fer thic it dil.

F. d. Ni gb gan s curu,
n ba n bas lugu,
sul donor mo mudu
i m-bail i m-biat sluig.
Danam thorrsed m'ardarc
cinnfet, cun cup comnart,
co n-dernur in comrac
ra Coinculaind craid.

M. Cid Domnall na Charpre
na Namn n airgne
gid at lucht na bairddne,
rot fat-su gid acht.
Fonasc latt ar Morand,
mad aill latt a chomall,
naisc Carpre mn Manand
is naisc ar da macc.

F. d. A Medb co mt m-buafaid,
nt chredb cine nuachair,
is derb is t is buachail
ar Cruachain na clad.
Ard glr is art gargnert,
dom-roiched srl santbrecc,
tuc dam th'r is t'arget,
daig ro fairgged dam.

M. Nach tussu in caur codnach
da tiber delgg n-drolmach
ndiu cot domnach,
ni ba dl bha sa.
A laich blatnig bhladmair,
cach st cem ar talmain
dabrthar duit amlaid,
is uili rot fia.

Finnabair na fergga
rgan iarthair Elgga
ar n-dth chon na cerdda
a Fir diad rot fia.

Then said they, one and all, those gifts were great. "'Tis true, they are great. But though they are," said Ferdiad, "with Medb herself I will leave them, and I will not accept them if it be to do battle or combat with my foster-brother, the man of my alliance and affection, and my equal in skill of arms, namely, with Cuchulain." And he said:
Is ann sin ro raidhsit cch uile i coitcinne gur mor na comadha sin. Cidh mor immorro, ar Fer diad, is ac Meidhbh fen beit uaim-si agus n ba hagam-sa doip ar comrac no ar comhlonn do ghenamh rem chombalta & rem fear cadaigh agus cumainn .i. Cuchulainn. Agus itbert:

"Greatest toil, this, greatest toil,
Battle with the Hound of gore!
Liefer would I battle twice
With two hundred men of Fal!
"Sad the fight, and sad the fight,
I and Hound of feats shall wage!
We shall hack both flesh and blood;
Skin and body we shall hew!

"Sad, O god, yea, sad, O god,
That a woman should us part!
My heart's half, the blameless Hound;
Half the brave Hound's heart am I!

"By my shield, O by my shield,
If Ath Cliath's brave Hound should fall,
I will drive my slender glaive
Through my heart, my side, my breast!

"By my sword, O by my sword,
If the Hound of Glen Bolg fall!
No man after him I'll slay,
Till I o'er the world's brink spring!

"By my hand, O, by my hand!
Falls the Hound of Glen in Sgail,
Medb with all her host I'll kill
And then no more men of Fal!

"By my spear, O, by my spear!
Should Ath Cro's brave Hound be slain,
I'll be buried in his grave;
May one grave hide me and him!

"Tell him this, O tell him this,
To the Hound of beauteous hue
Fearless Scathach hath foretold
My fall on a ford through him!

"Woe to Medb, yea, woe to Medb,
Who hath used her guile on us;
She hath set me face to face
'Gainst Cuchulain-- hard the toil!"
Feidbm as mo
comrac re Coinculainn cr,
trag nach da cet d'feraib Fail
dus-ficfedh im dail fa dh.
Truagh an tres
beras m as C na ccleas,
tescfamit feoil agus fuil,
gearrfamait corp agus cnes.

Truag a Dh
teacht do mhnaoi eadrom as ,
leth mo croidhi in C cen col,
agus leth croidhi na Con m.

Dar mo sgiath,
da marbhar C Atha cliath,
saithfidh m mo cloidebh caol
trem croidhi trem taobh trem chliabh.

Dar mo colg,
da marbhar C Glinne bolg,
ni mnirbhf(eat) duine dh s,
nocha d-tiobar lem tar bor(d).

Dar mo laim,
da marbhar C Glinne in sgail,
muirbhf(idh) m Meidhbh cona sluagh
agus ns mo d'fearaibh Fail.

Dar mo g,
da marbhar C Atha cr,
adlaicthear misi ina fert,
bidh ionann leact damh is d.

Abair ris,
risin cCoin go ccaimhi cnis,
gur tairngir Sgthach gan sgth,
misi ar th do tuitim ris.

Mairg do Meidb,
ro imbir oruinn a delm,
misi do cur cenn i ccenn
as Cuchulainn as tenn feidm.

"Ye men," spake Medb, in the wonted fashion of stirring up disunion and dissension, "true is the word Cuchulain speaks." "What word is that?" asked Ferdiad. "He said, then," replied Medb, "he would not think it too much if thou shouldst fall by his hands in the choicest feat of his skill in arms, in the land whereto he should come." "It was not just for him to speak so," quoth Ferdiad; "for it is not cowardice or lack of boldness that he hath ever seen in me. And I swear by my arms of valour, if it be true that he spoke so, I will be the first man of the men of Erin to contend with him on the morrow!" "A blessing and victory upon thee for that!" said Medb; "it pleaseth me more than for thee to show fear and lack of boldness. For every man loves his own land, and how is it better for him to seek the welfare of Ulster, than for thee to seek the welfare of Connacht?"
A fiora, ar Medbh tre cir n-iondlaigh & n-iomchosaidi, as for in briathar itbert Cc. Crt an briathar sin, ar Fer diad. Adubairt immorro, ar Medhbh, na badh furil les do tuitim-si les in airigidh gaisgidh isin tir a racadh. Nior coir do-som sin do radha, ar Fer diad, uair n h mo metacht-so n mo milaochdacht ro fitir-siom form-sa riamh. Agus luighim-si fm armaibh, mas fior a rdha sin d-somh, comadh misi cetfear comhraicfes fris amrach d'feraib Erenn. Bendacht fort-sa d cionn sin, ar Medhbh, ferr liom-sa sin ina time agus milaochas do dhenamh duit, uair as badhach nech im tir fn agus cia cora dosan sochar Uladh do dhnamh ina duit-si sochar Connacht.

Then it was that Medb obtained from Ferdiad the easy surety of a covenant to fight and contend on the morrow with six warriors of the champions of Erin, or to fight and contend with Cuchulain alone, if to him this last seemed lighter. Ferdiad obtained of Medb the easy surety, as he thought, to send the aforesaid six men for the fulfilment of the terms which had been promised him, should Cuchulain fall at his hands.
Is andsain ra siacht Medb math n-raig bar Fer n-diad im chomlond & im chomrac ra sessiur curad arna brach, n im chomlond & im chomrac ra Coinculaind a oenur, da m-bad assu leiss. Ra siacht Fer diad math n-araig furrisi [no andar leis] im chur in t-sessir chtna im na comadaib ra gellad do do chomallud riss, mad da toetsad Cuchulaind leiss.

Then were Fergus' horses fetched for him and his chariot was yoked, and he came forward to the place of combat where Cuchulain was, to inform him of the challenge. Cuchulain bade him welcome. "Welcome is thy coming, O my master Fergus!" cried Cuchulain. "Truly intended, methinks, the welcome, O fosterling," said Fergus. "But, it is for this I am here, to inform thee who comes to fight and contend with thee at the morning hour early on the morrow." "E'en so will we hear it from thee," said Cuchulain. "Thine own friend and comrade and foster-brother, the man thine equal in feats and in skill of arms and in deeds, Ferdiad son of Daman son of Dar, the great and mighty warrior of the men of Domnann."
Andsain ra gabait a eich d'Fergus & ra hindled a charpat, ocus tnic reme co airm (a m-boi Cuchulainn da innisin) do sain. Firiss Cuchulaind falti riss. Mochen do thchtu a mo phopa Ferguis, bar Cuchulaind. Tarissi lim inn inn flti a daltin, bar Fergus. Acht is do ra dechad-sa, da innisin duit int ro that do chomlond & do chomruc rutt ra hair na maitne muche imbrach. Clunemni latt didiu, bar Cuchulaind. Do chara fin & do chocle & do chomalta, th'fer comchliss & comgascid & comgnma, Fer diad mac Damain meic Dre, in milid mrchalma d'feraib Domnand.

"As my soul liveth," replied Cuchulain, "it is not to an encounter we wish our friend to come." "It is even for that," answered Fergus, "thou shouldst be on thy guard and prepared. For unlike all to whom it fell to fight and contend with thee on the Cualnge Cattle-raid on this occasion is Ferdiad son of Daman son of Dar." "Truly am I here," said Cuchulain, "checking and staying four of the five grand provinces of Erin from Monday at Summer's end till the beginning of spring. And in all this time, I have not put foot in retreat before any one man nor before a multitude, and methinks just as little will I turn foot in flight before him."
Attear ar cobais, bar Cuchulaind, n na dil duthracmar ar cara do thuidecht. Is aire sein iarum ale, bar Fergus, ara n-airichlea & ara n-airelma, dig n mar chach conarnecar comlund & comrac riut for tain b Cualnge don chur sa, Fer diad mac Damain meic Dare. Attsa sund m, bar Cuchulaind, ac fostud & ac imfurech cethri n-ollchoiced n-hErend o lan taite samna co tate imbuilg, acus ni rucus traig techid re n-oenfer risin re sin, & is dig lim ni m brat remi-sium.

So spake Fergus, putting him on his guard, and he said these words and Cuchulain responded:

Fergus: "O Cuchulain-- splendid deed--
Lo, 'tis time for thee to rise.
Here in rage against thee comes
Ferdiad, red-faced Daman's son!"
Cuchulain: "Here am I-- no easy task--
Holding Erin's men at bay;
Foot I've never turned in flight
In my fight with single foe!"

Fergus: "Dour the man when anger moves,
Owing to his gore-red glaive;
Ferdiad wears a skin of horn,
'Gainst which fight nor might prevails!"

Cuchulain: "Be thou still urge not thy tale,
Fergus of the mighty arms.
On no land and on no ground,
For me is there aught defeat!"

Fergus: "Fierce the man with scores of deeds;
No light thing, him to subdue.
Strong as hundreds-- brave his mien--
Point pricks not, edge cuts him not!"

Cuchulain: "If we clash upon the ford,
I and Ferdiad of known skill,
We'll not part without we know:
Fierce will be our weapon fight!"

Fergus: "More I'd wish it than reward,
O Cuchulain of red sword,
Thou shouldst be the one to bring
Eastward haughty Ferdiad's spoils!"

Cuchulain: "Now I give my word and vow,
Though unskilled in strife of words,
It is I will conquer this
Son of Daman macDar!"

Fergus: It is I brought east the host,
Thus requiting Ulster's wrong.
With me came they from their lands,
With their heroes and their chiefs!"

Cuchulain: "Were not Conchobar in the 'Pains,'
Hard 'twould be to come near us.
Never Medb of Mag in Scail
On more tearful march had come!"

Fergus: "Greatest deed awaits thy hand:
Fight with Ferdiad, Daman's son.
Hard stern arms with stubborn edge,
Shalt thou have, thou Culann's Hound!"
Acus iss amlaid ra bai Fergus ga rd ga baglugud & rabert na briathra & ra recair Cuchulaind:

F.: A Chuculaind, comal n-gle,
atchiu is mithig duit irge,
at sund chucut ra feirg
Fer diad mac Damin drechdeirg.
Cc.: At-sa sund, ni sel saeng,
ac trenastud fer n-hErend,
n rucus for teched traig
ar apa chomlond oenfir.

F.: Amnas in fer dalae feirg
as luss a chlaidib crdeirg,
cnes congna im Fer n-diad na n-drong,
ris n geib cath na comlond.

Cc.: B tost, na tacair do scl,
a Ferguis na n-arm n-imthrn,
dar cach ferand dar cach fond
dam-sa nochon ecomlond.

F.: Amnas in fer fichtib gal,
nochon furusa a threthad,
nert ct na churp, calma in mod,
nin geib rind nin tesc faebor.

Cc.: Mad dia comairsem bar th,
missi is Fer diad gascid ghnth,
ni ba in scarad gan sceo,
bud ferggach ar faebargleo.

F.: Ra pad ferr lem anda lag,
a Chuchulaind chlaidebrad,
co m-bad tu ra berad sair
coscur Fir diad diummasaig.

Cc.: Atiur-sa brethir co m-big,
gon com maith-se oc immarbig,
is missi bnadaigfes de
bar mac n-Damain meic Dre.

F.: Is me targlaim na sluagu sair,
lag mo saraigthe d'Ultaib,
lim thancatar tirib
a curaid a cathmilid.

Cc.: Mun bud Chonchobar na chess,
r pad chraid in comadchess,
ni thnic Medb Maige in Scil
turus bad m con-gir.

F.: Ra fail gnm is m bard lim,
gleo ra Fer n-diad mac Damain,
arm craid catut cardda raind
bid acut a Chuculaind.

After that, Fergus returned to the camp and halting-place. As for Ferdiad, he betook himself to his tent and to his people, and imparted to them the easy surety which Medb had obtained from him to do combat and battle with six warriors on the morrow, or to do combat and battle with Cuchulain alone, if he thought it a lighter task. He made known to them also the fair terms he had obtained from Medb of sending the same six warriors for the fulfilment of the covenant she had made with him, should Cuchulain fall by his hands. The folk of Ferdiad were not joyful, blithe, cheerful or merry that night, but they were sad, sorrowful and downcast, for they knew that where the two champions and the two bulwarks in a gap for a hundred met in combat, one or other of them would fall there or both would fall, and if it should be one of them, they believed it would be their king and their own lord that would fall there, for it was not easy to contend and do battle with Cuchulain on the Raid for the Kine of Cualnge.
Tanic Fergus reme dochum n-dunaid & longphuirt. Luid Fer diad dochum a pupla & a muntiri, acus rachaid dib math n-raig do tharrachtain do Meidb fair im chomlond & im chomrac ra sessiur curad arna barach, n im chomlund & im chomrac ra Coinculaind a oenur, dia m-bad assu leiss. Dachuaid dib no meth n-raig do tharrachtain do- som for Meidb im chuir in t-seisir churad chetna im na comadaib ra gellad do do chomallad riss, mad da tatsad Cuchulaind leiss. Nirdar subaig smaig sobb ronaig somenmnaig lucht puible Fir diad inn aidchi sin), acht rapsat dubaig dobbrnaig domenmnaig, dig ra fetatar airm condricfaitis na da curaid & na da chliathbernaid chet co taetsad cechtar db and n co taetsatis a n-ds, acus dam nechtar db, dig lo-som go m-bad a tigerna fin, dig ni ba reid comlond na comrac ra Coinculaind for tain bo Cualnge.

Ferdiad slept right heavily the first part of the night, but when the end of the night was come, his sleep and his heaviness left him. And the anxiousness of the combat and the battle came upon him. And he charged his charioteer to take his horses and to yoke his chariot. The charioteer sought to dissuade him from that journey. "By our word," said the gilla, "'twould be better for thee to remain than to go thither," said he. And in this manner he spake, and he uttered these words, and the henchman responded:
Ra chotail Fer diad tossach na haidchi co rothromm, acus thanic deired na haidchi ra chaid a chotlud ad & ra luid a mesci de. Acus da bi ceist in chomlaind & in chomraic fair, acus ra gab lim ar a araid ara n-gabad a eocho & ara n-indled a charpat. Ra gab in t-ara ga imthairmesc imme. Ra pad ferr dib, ar se, ingilla. Bi tost dn, a gillai, ar Fer diad. Acus issamlaid ra bi ga rd & rabert na briathra and & ra frecair in gilla.

Ferdiad: "Let's haste to th' encounter,
To battle with this man;
The ford we will come to,
O'er which Badb will shriek!
To meet with Cuchulain,
To wound his slight body,
To thrust the spear through him
So that he may die!"
The Henchman: "To stay it were better;
Your threats are not gentle
Death's sickness will one have,
And sad will ye part!
To meet Ulster's noblest
To meet whence ill cometh;
Long will men speak of it.
Alas, for your course!"

Ferdiad: "Not fair what thou speakest;
No fear hath the warrior;
We owe no one meekness;
We stay not for thee!
Hush, gilla, about us!
The time will bring strong hearts;
More meet strength than weakness;
Let's on to the tryst!"
Tiagam issin dail-sea
do chosnam ind fir-sea,
gorrsem in n-th-sa,
th fors n-gera in badb,
i comdil Conculaind
da guin tre chreitt cumainhg,
gorruca thrt urraind,
corop de bus marb.
Ra pad ferr dib anad,
n ba mn far magar,
biaid nech dia m-ba galar,
bar scarad bud snid.
Techt in-dil ailt Ulad
is dl dia m-bia pudar,
is fata bas chuman,
mairg ragas in rim.

Ni cir ana rdi,
ni hopair niad nre,
ni dlegar dn ale,
ni anfam fad dig.
Bi tost dn a gillai,
bid calma r sst sinni,
ferr teinni na timmi,
(tiagam isin dil.)

Ferdiad's horses were now brought forth and his chariot was hitched, and he set out from the camp for the ford of battle when yet day with its full light had not come there for him. "Come, gilla," said Ferdiad, "spread for me the cushions and skins of my chariot under me here, so that I sleep off my heavy fit of sleep and slumber here, for I slept not the last part of the night with the anxiousness of the battle and combat." The gilla unharnessed the horses; he unfastened the chariot under him. He slept off the heavy fit of sleep that was on him.
Ra gabait a eich Fir diad & ra indled a charpat acus tanic reme co th in chomraic, acus ni thnic l cona lnsoilsi d and itir. Maith a gillai, bar Fer diad, scar dam fortcha & forgemen mo charpait fm and-so coro tholiur mo thromthairthim sain & chotulta and-so, dig ni ra chotlus deired na haidchi ra ceist in chomlaind & in chomraic. Ra scoir in gilla na eich, ra discuir in carpat fe. Toilis a thromthairthim cotulta fair.

Now how Cuchulain fared is related here: He arose not till the day with its bright light had come to him, lest the men of Erin might say it was fear or fright of the champion he had, if he should arise early. And when day with its full light had come, he passed his hand over his face and bade his charioteer take his horses and yoke them to his chariot. "Come, gilla," said Cuchulain, "take out our horses for us and harness our chariot, for an early riser is the warrior appointed to meet us, Ferdiad son of Daman son of Dar. "The horses are taken out," said the gilla; "the chariot is harnessed. Mount, and be it no shame to thy valour to go thither!"
Imthusa Conculaind sunda innossa. Ni erracht side itir, co tnic laa cona lnsoilse d, dig na hapraitis fir hErend is ecla no is uamun dobrad fair, mad da n-eirged. Acus thanic laa cona lansolsi, ra gab lim ar araid, ara n-gabad a eocho & ara n-indled a charpat. Maith a gillai, bar Cuchulaind, geib ar n-eich dn & innill ar carpat, dig is mochergech in laech ra dil nar n-dil, Fer diad mac Damain meic Dare. Is gabtha na eich, iss innilti in carpat. Cind-siu and, & ni tr dot gasciud.

Then it was that the cutting, feat-performing, battle-winning, red-sworded hero, Cuchulain son of Sualtaim, mounted his chariot, so that there shrieked around him the goblins and fiends and the sprites of the glens and the demons of the air; for the Tuatha De Danann ('the Folk of the Goddess Danu') were wont to set up their cries around him, to the end that the dread and the fear and the fright and the terror of him might be so much the greater in every battle and on every field, in every fight and in every combat wherein he went.
Is and-sin cinnis in cur cetach clessamnach cathbuadach claidebderg, Cuchulaind mac Sualtaim, ina charpat, gu ra gairsetar imme boccanaig & bnanaig & geniti glinne & demna aeir, daig dabertis Tuatha De Danand a n-gariud immi-sium, co m-bad mti a grin & a ecla & a urad & a uruamain in cach cath & in cach cathri, in cach comlund & in cach comruc i teiged.

Not long had Ferdiad's charioteer waited when he heard something: A rush and a crash and a hurtling sound, and a din and a thunder, and a clatter and a clash, namely, the shield-cry of feat-shields, and the jangle of javelins, and the deed-striking of swords, and the thud of the helmet, and the ring of spears, and the striking of arms, the fury of feats, the straining of ropes, and the whirr of wheels, and the creaking of the chariot, and the trampling of horses' hoofs, and the deep voice of the hero and battle-warrior on his way to the ford to attack his opponent. The servant came and touched his master with his hand. "Ferdiad, master," said the youth, "rise up! They are here to meet thee at the ford." And the gilla spake these words:
Nir bo chian d'araid Fir diad, co cuala inn: (in fuaim & an fothram agus in fidren & in toirm & in torann &) in sestanib & in ssilbi, .i. sceldgur na scath cliss & slicrech na sleg & glondbimnech na claideb & bressimnech in chathbarr & drongar na lurigi & imchommilt na n-arm, dechraidecht na cless, teteinmnech na tt, & nuallgrith na roth & culgaire in charpait & basschaire na n-ech & trommchoblach in churad & in chathmiled dochum inn tha d saigid. Tanic in gilla & forromair a lim for a thigerna. Maith a Fir diad, bar in gilla, comerig & atthar sund chucut dochum inn atha. Acus rabert in gilla na briathra and:

"The roll of a chariot,
Its fair yoke of silver;
A man great and stalwart
O'ertops the strong car!
O'er Bri Ross, o'er Bran
Their swift path they hasten;
Past Old-tree Town's tree-stump,
Victorious they speed!
"A sly Hound that driveth,
A fair chief that urgeth,
A free hawk that speedeth
His steeds towards the south!
Gore-coloured, the Cua,
'Tis sure he will take us
We know-- vain to hide it--
He brings us defeat!

Woe him on the hillock,
The brave Hound before him;
Last year I foretold it,
That some time he'd come!
Hound from Emain Macha,
Hound formed of all colours,
The Border-hound War-hound,
I hear what I've heard!"
Atchlunim cul carpait
ra cuing n-alaind n-argait,
is fuath fir co forbairt
as droich carpait chruaid.
Dar Breg Ross dar Braine
fochengat in slige,
sech bun Baile in bile,
is buadach a m-baid.
Is c airgdech aiges,
is carptech glan geibes,
is seboc sar slaidess
a eocho fa dess.
Is crdatta in cua,
is demin don-rua,
ra fess, ni ba tua,
dobeir dn in tress.

Mairg bhas isin tulaig
ar cind in chon cubaid,
barrarngert-sa n uraid
ticfad giped chuin.
C na hEmna Macha,
c co n-deilb cach datha,
c chrichi, c catha,
dochlunim rar cluin.

"Come, gilla," said Ferdiad; "for what reason laudest thou this man ever since I am come from my house? And it is almost a cause for strife with thee that thou hast praised him thus highly. But, Ailill and Medb have prophesied to me that this man will fall by my hand. And since it is for a reward, he shall quickly be torn asunder by me, but it is time to fetch help." And he spake these words, and the henchman responded:
Maith a gillaa, bar Fer diad, ga fth ma ra molais in fer sain thanac tig, & is suail nach fatha conais dait a romt ros molais, & barairngert Ailill & Medb dam-sa go taetsad in fer sain lemm. Acus dig is dar cend lage locherthair lem-sa colluath . Acus is mithig in chobair. Acus rabert na briathra and & ra recair in gilla:

Ferdiad: "'Tis time now to help me;
Be silent! cease praising!
'Twas no deed of friendship,
No doom o'er the brink(?)
The Champion of Cualnge,
Thou seest 'midst proud feats,
For that it's for guerdon,
Shall quickly be slain!"
The Henchman: "I see Cualnge's hero,
With feats overweening,
Not fleeing he flees us,
But towards us he comes.
He runneth-- not slowly--
Though cunning-- not sparing--
Like water down high cliff
Or thunderbolt quick!"

Ferdiad: "'Tis cause of a quarrel,
So much thou hast praised him;
And why hast thou chose him,
Since I am from home?
And now they extol him,
They fall to proclaim him;
None come to attack him,
But soft simple men(?)."
Is mithig in chabair,
b tost dn nach m-bladaig,
nar bhu gnm ar codail,
dig ni brth dar brach.
Match churaid Cualnge
co n-adabraib ualle,
daig is dar cend luage,
locherthair collath.
Mtchm curaid Cualnhge
co n-adabraib ualle,
nir teiched tet unne,
act is cucaind tic.
Rethid is n romll,
gid rogath ni rogand,
mar dusci dforall]
n mar thoraind tricc.

Suail nach fotha (conais)
aromt ras molaiss,
ga fth ma ra thogais,
thnac tig.
Issinnossa thcbhait,
att ac a fuacairt,
ni thecat da fuapairt
acht athig mith.

Here followeth the Description of Cuchulain's chariot, one of the three chief Chariots of the Tale of the Foray of Cualnge.


It was not long that Ferdiad's charioteer remained there when he saw something: a beautiful, five-pointed chariot, approaching with swiftness, with speed, with perfect skill; with a green shade, with a thin-framed, dry-bodied (?) box surmounted with feats of cunning, straight-poled, as long as a warrior's sword. On this was room for a hero's seven arms, the fair seat for its lord; behind two fleet steeds, large-eared, gaily prancing, with inflated nostrils, broad-chested, quick-hearted, high-flanked, broad-hoofed, slender-limbed, overpowering and resolute. A grey, broad-hipped, small-stepping, long-maned horse was under one of the yokes of the chariot; a black, crisped-maned, swift-moving, broad-backed horse under the other. Like unto a hawk after its prey on a sharp tempestuous day, or to a tearing blast of wind of Spring on a March day over the back of a plain, or unto a startled stag when first roused by the hounds in the first of the chase, were Cuchulain's two horses before the chariot, as if they were on glowing, fiery flags, so that they shook the earth and made it tremble with the fleetness of their course.
Nir bho chian d'araid Fir diad, dia m-bi and, co facca n: in carpat cin cicrind, gollth gollais go lngliccus, go pupaill uanide, go creit chraestana chraestrim, chlessaird cholgfata churata, ar da n-echaib latha lemnecha, mair bulid bedgaig, bolgrin, uchtlethna, beochridi, blenarda basslethna cosschaela, forttrna, forrncha fua. Ech lath leslethan, lugleimnech lebormonhgach, fn dara chuing don charpait, ech dub dalach dulbrass druimlethan fn chuing araill. Ba samalta ra sebacc da chlaiss ill chruadgithi, n ra sidi rpgaithi erraig illo mrtai dar muni machairi, na ra tetag n-allaid arna chetgluasacht do chonaib do chtri da ech Conculaind immon carpat, mar bad ar licc in tentidi, con crothsat & con bertsat in talmain, ra tricci na drma.

And Cuchulain reached the ford. Ferdiad waited on the south side of the ford; Cuchulain stood on the north side. Ferdiad bade welcome to Cuchulain. "Welcome is thy coming, O Cuchulain!" said Ferdiad. "Truly spoken meseemed thy welcome till now," answered Cuchulain; "but to-day I put no more trust in it. And, O Ferdiad," said Cuchulain, "it were fitter for me to bid thee welcome than that thou should'st welcome me; for it is thou that art come to the land and province wherein I dwell, and it is not fitting for thee to come to contend and do battle with me but it were fitter for me to go to contend and do battle with thee. For before thee in flight are my women and my boys and my youths, my steeds and my troops of horses, my droves, my flocks and my herds of cattle."
Acus dariacht Cuchulaind dochum inn tha. Tarrasair Fer diad barsan leith descertach ind tha. Dessid Cuchulaind barsan leith tascertach. Firis Fer diad failte fri Coinculaind. Mochen do thictu a Chuchulaind, bar Fer diad. Tarissi lim n ind falti mad cos trath sa, bar Cuchulaind, & indiu ni denaim tarissi de chena. Acus a Fir diad, bar Cuchulaind, ra po chru dam-sa flti d'ferthain frit-su na dait-siu a ferthain rum-sa, dig is tu dariacht in crch & in coiced it-sa. Acus n rachor duit-siu tchtain do chomlund & do chomrac rim-sa & ra pa choru dam-sa dol do chomlond & do chomrac rut-su, dag is romut-su att mo mna-sa & mo meic & mo maccemi, m'eich & m'echrada, m'albi & m'iti & m'indili.

"Good, O Cuchulain," spake Ferdiad; "what has ever brought thee out to contend and do battle with me? For when we were together with Scathach and with Uathach and with Aif, thou wast my serving-man, even for arming my spear and dressing my bed." "That was indeed true," answered Cuchulain; "because of my youth and my littleness did I so much for thee, but this is by no means my mood this day. For there is not a warrior in the world I would not drive off this day."
Maith a Chuchulaind, bar Fer diad, cid rot tuc-su do chomlund & do chomrac rim-sa itir, dag d m-bammar ac Scthaig & ac Uathaig & ac ifi, is tussu ba forbhfer frithalma damsa, .i. ra armad mo slega & ra dirged mo lepaid. Is fr m sain ale, bar Cuchulaind, ar ice & ar itidchi donin-sea duit-siu, acus n h sin tuarascbil bha t-sa indiu itir, acht ni fil barsin bith laech nach dingeb-sa indiu.

And then it was that each of them cast sharp-cutting reproaches at the other, renouncing his friendship. And Ferdiad spake these words there, and Cuchulain responded:
Acus iss and-sin ferais cechtar n-i db athcossan n-athgr n-athcharatraid rraile. Acus rabert Fer diad na briathra and & ra recair Cuchulaind:

Ferdiad: "What led thee, O Cua,
To fight a strong champion?
Thy flesh will be gore-red
O'er smoke of thy steeds!
Alas for thy journey,
A kindling of firebrands;
In sore need of healing,
If home thou shouldst reach!"
Cuchulain: "I'm come before warriors
Around the herd's wild Boar,
Before troops and hundreds,
To drown thee in deep
In anger, to prove thee
In hundred-fold battle,
Till on thee come havoc,
Defending thy head!"

Ferdiad: "Here stands one to crush thee,
'Tis I will destroy thee,
. . . . .
From me there shall come
The flight of their warriors
In presence of Ulster,
That long they'll remember
The loss that was theirs!"

Cuchulain: "How then shall we combat?
For wrongs shall we heave sighs?
Despite all, we'll go there,
To fight on the ford!
Or is it with hard swords,
Or e'en with red spear-points,
Before hosts to slay thee,
If thy hour hath come?"

Ferdiad: "'Fore sunset, 'fore nightfall--
If need be, then guard thee--
I'll fight thee at Bairch,
Not bloodlessly fight!
The Ulstermen call thee,
'He has him!' Oh, hearken!
The sight will distress them
That through them will pass!"

Cuchulain: "In danger's gap fallen,
At hand is thy life's term;
On thee plied be weapons,
Not gentle the skill!
One champion will slay thee;
We both will encounter;
No more shalt lead forays,
From this day till Doom!"

Ferdiad: "Avaunt with thy warnings,
Thou world's greatest braggart;
Nor guerdon nor pardon,
Low warrior for thee!
'Tis I that well know thee,
Thou heart of a cageling--
This lad merely tickles--
Without skill or force!"

Cuchulain: "When we were with Scathach,
For wonted arms' training,
Together we'd fare forth,
To seek every fight.
Thou wast my heart's comrade,
My clan and my kinsman;
Ne'er found I one dearer;
Thy loss would be sad!"

Ferdiad: "Thou wager'st thine honour
Unless we do battle;
Before the cock croweth,
Thy head on a spit!
Cuchulain of Cualnge,
Mad frenzy hath seized thee
All ill we'll wreak on thee,
For thine is the sin!"
F. d.: Cid ratuc a chua
do throit ra nad nua,
bud croderg da chrua
as analaib th'ech.
Mairg (tanic) do thurus,
bhud atd ra haires,
ricfa a less do legess,
mad da ris do thech.
Cc.: Dodechad r n-caib
im torc trethan trtaig
re cathaib re ctaib
dot chur-su fan lind
d'feirg rut is dot romad
bar comrac ct conar,
co rop dait bas fogal
do chosnom do chind.

F. d.: Fai sund nech rat mla,
is missi rat gna
. . . . . . . .
dag is dm facrith (.i. tic)
conugud a cura
i fiadnassi Ulad,
go rop cian bas chuman
go rop dib bus dth.

Cc.: Car cinnas condricfam,
in ar collaib cneittfem.
gid leind rarrficfam
do chomrac ar th.
inn ar claidbib cradaib
n nar rennaib radaib
dot slaidi rt sluagaib
ma thnic a thrth.

F. d.: Re funiud re n-aidchi,
madit eicen airrthe,
comrac dait re Bairche (.i. sliab)
n ba bn in glo.
Ulaid acot gairm-siu
rangabastar aillsiu,
bud olc dib in taidbsiu,
rachthair thairsiu is tro.

Cc.: Dat rla i m-beirn m-baegail,
tanic cend do saegail,
imbrthair fort febair,
n ba fill in fth.
Bud morglonnach bias,
condricfa cach dis,
ni ba toesech tris
t andiu go ti brth.

F. d.: Beir ass dn do robhud,
is tu is brassi for domon,
nt fia luag na logud,
ni dat doss s duss.
Is missi rat fitir
a chride ind eoin ittig,
at gilla co n-gicgil
gan gasced gan gus.

Cc.: Da m-bammar ac Scathaig
allus gascid gnathaig,
is aren imreidms,
imthigms cach fch.
Tu mo chocne cride,
tu m'aiccme, tu m'fine,
ni fuar riam bad dile,
badursan do dth.

F. d.: Romr fcbai th'einech
conna dernam deibech,
siul gairmes in cailech,
biaid do chend ar bir.
A Chuchulaind Cualnge,
rot gab baile is badre,
rot fa cach olc uanne,
dig is dait a chin.

"Come now, O Ferdiad," cried Cuchulain, "not meet was it for thee to come to contend and do battle with me, because of the instigation and intermeddling of Ailill and Medb. And all that came because of those promises of deceit, neither profit nor success did it bring them, and they have fallen by me. And none the more, Ferdiad, shall it win victory or increase of fame for thee; and, shalt thou too fall by my hand!" Thus he spake, and he further uttered these words and Ferdiad hearkened to him:--
Maith a Fir diad, bar Cuchulaind, nir chir duit-siu tiachtain do chomlund & do chomrac rum-sa tr indlach & etarchossit Ailella & Medba, & cach oen tanic ni ruc buaid na bissech dib, & darochratar limm-sa, & n m bras baid na bissech duit-siu & ra fethaisiu limm. Is amlaid ra bi g rd & rabert na briathra, & ra gab Fer diad clostecht fris.

"Come not nigh me, noble chief,
Ferdiad, comrade, Daman's son.
Worse for thee than 'tis for me;
Thou'lt bring sorrow to a host!
"Come not nigh me 'gainst all right;
Thy last bed is made by me.
Why shouldst thou alone escape
From the prowess of my arms?

"Shall not great feats thee undo,
Though thou'rt purple, horny-skinned?
And the maid thou boastest of,
Shall not, Daman's son, be thine!

"Finnabair, Medb's daughter fair,
Great her charms though they may be,
Fair as is the damsel's form,
She's for thee not to enjoy!

"Finnabair, the king's own child,
Is the lure, if truth be told;
Many they whom she's deceived
And undone as she has thee!

"Break not, weetless, oath with me;
Break not friendship, break not bond;
Break not promise, break not word;
Come not nigh me, noble chief!

"Fifty chiefs obtained in plight
This same maid, a proffer vain.
Through me went they to their graves;
Spear-right all they had from me!

"Though for brave was held Ferbaeth,
With whom was a warriors' train,
In short space I quelled his rage;
Him I slew with one sole blow!

"Srubdar-- sore sank his might--
Darling of the noblest dames,
Time there was when great his fame--
Gold nor raiment saved him not!

"Were she mine affianced wife,
Smiled on me this fair land's head,
I would not thy body hurt,
Right nor left, in front, behind!"
Na tair chucum a lich lin
a Fir diad, a meic Damain,
is messu duit nam-bia de,
contirfe brn sochaide.
Na tair chucum dar fircert,
is lim-sa at do thiglecht,
cid nabreth and dait namm
mo gleo-sa ramileda.

Nachat mucled ilar cless,
girsat corcra conhganchness,
inn ingen asati oc big,
ni ba lett a meic Damin.

Findabair ingea Medba,
ge beith d'febas a delba,
in ingen gid cem a cruth,
nochos tibrea re ctluth.

Findabair ingen in rg,
ind rth atberar a fr,
sochaide mattart bric
acus do loitt do letheit.

Na briss form lugi gan fess,
na bris chg, na briss cairdess,
na briss brethir bag,
na tair chucum a laich lin.

Ra dled do choicait lach
in ingen, n dal dimbaeth,
is limm-sa ra fid allecht,
ni rucsat uaim acht crandchert.

Gia ramaess menmnach Fer beth
aca m-bi teglach daglaech,
gar ar gur furmius a bruth,
ra marbus din oen urchur.

Srubdaire serb seirge a gal,
ba rnbale na ct m-ban,
mr a bladalt ra bi than,
ni ranacht r na etgad.

Da m-bad dam ra naidmthea in bein,
ris tib cend na coiced cain,
nocho dergfaind-se do chlab
tess na tuaid na thiar na thair.

"Good, O Ferdiad!" cried Cuchulain. "It is not right for thee to come to fight and combat with me; for when we were with Scathach and with Uathach and with Aif, and it was together we were used to seek out every battle and every battle-field, every combat and every contest, every wood and every desert, every covert and every recess." And thus he spake and he uttered these words:
Maith a Fir diad, bar Cuchulaind, is aire-sin na rachir duit-siu tiachtain do chomlund & do chomruc rim-sa, dig da m-bammar ac Scathaig & ac Uathaig & ac Aife, is aron imthigms cach cath & cach cathri, cach comlund & cach comrac, cach fid & cach fsach, cach dorcha & cach diamair. Acus is amlaid ra bi g rada & rbert na briathra and:

Cuchulain: "We were heart-companions once;
We were comrades in the woods;
We were men that shared a bed,
When we slept the heavy sleep,
After hard and weary fights.
Into many lands, so strange,
Side by side we sallied forth,
And we ranged the woodlands through,
When with Scathach we learned arms!"
Ferdiad: "O Cuchulain, rich in feats,
Hard the trade we both have learned;
Treason hath o'ercome our love;
Thy first wounding hath been bought;
Think not of our friendship more,
Cua, it avails thee not!"
Ropdhar cocle cridi,
ropdhar caemthe caille,
ropdhar fir chomdeirgide,
contulmis tromchotlud
ar trommnthaib
i crchaib ilib echtrannaib.
aroen imreidms
imtheigms cach fid
forcetul fri Scathaig.
A Chuchulaind chaemchlessach, bar Fer diad,
ra chindsem ceird comdana,
ra chliset cuir caratraid,
bocritha do chetguine.
na cumnig in comaltus,
a chua nachat chobradar.

"Too long are we now in this way," quoth Ferdiad; "and what arms shall we resort to to-day, O Cuchulain?" "With thee is thy choice of weapons this day," answered Cuchulain, "for thou art he that first didst reach the ford." "Rememberest thou at all," asked Ferdiad "the choice deeds of arms we were wont to practise with Scathach and with Uathach and with Aif?" "Indeed, and I do remember," answered Cuchulain. "If thou rememberest, let us begin with them."
Rofata atm amlaid-seo bhadesta, bar Fer diad, acus ga gasced ar a ragam indiu, a Chuchulaind. Lat-su do roga gascid chaidchi indiu, bar Cuchulaind, daig is t dariacht in n-th ar tus. Indat mebhair-siu itir, bar Fer diad, isna airigthib gascid danmms ac Scathaig & ac Uathaig & ac Aife. Isamm mebhair m cin, bar Cuchulaind. Masa mebair, tecam.

They betook them to their choicest deeds of arms. They took upon them two equally-matched shields for feats, and their eight-edged targes for feats, and their eight small darts, and their eight straightswords with ornaments of walrus-tooth and their eight lesser, ivoried spears which flew from them and to them like bees on a day of fine weather. They cast no weapon that struck not. Each of them was busy casting at the other with those missiles from morning's early twilight till noon at mid-day, the while they overcame their various feats with the bosses and hollows of their feat-shields. However great the excellence of the throwing on either side, equally great was the excellence of the defence, so that during all that time neither of them bled or reddened the other. "Let us cease now from this bout of arms, O Cuchulain," said Ferdiad; "for it is not by such our decision will come." "Yea, surely, let us cease, if the time hath come," answered Cuchulain. Then they ceased. They threw their feat-tackle from them into the hands of their charioteers.
Dachuatarbar a n-airigthib gascid. Ra gabsatar d sciath chliss chmardathacha forro & an-ochtn-ocharchliss, an-ocht clettni & a n-ocht cuilg n-dt & a n-ocht n-gothnatta net, imreits athu & chuccu mar beocho anle (no aille), ni thelgtis nad amsitis. Ra gab cch db ac diburgun araile dina clesradaib sin dorblas na matne muche go mide medoin li, go ra chloesetar a n-ilchlessarda ra tilib & chobradaib na scath cliss. Gia ra bai d'febas in imdburcthi, ra bi d'febas na himdegla nra fulig & nara forderg cch dib bar araile risin r sin. Scurem din gaisced sa fodesta a Chuchulaind, bar Fer diad, dig ni de-seo tic ar n-eterglod. Scurem m cin, ma thanic a thrath, bar Cuchulaind. Ra scoirsetar. Focherdsetar a clesrada uathaib illamaib a n-arad.

"To what weapons shall we resort next, O Cuchulain?" asked Ferdiad. "Thine is the choice of weapons till nightfall," replied Cuchulain; "for thou art he that didst first reach the ford." "Let us begin, then," said Ferdiad, "with our straight-cut, smooth-hardened throwing-spears, with cords of full-hard flax on them." "Aye, let us begin then," assented Cuchulain. Then they took on them two hard shields, equally strong. They fell to their straight-cut, smooth-hardened spears with cords of full-hard flax on them. Each of them was engaged in casting at the other with the spears from the middle of noon till the hour of evening's sundown. However great the excellence of the defence, equally great was the excellence of the throwing on either side, so that each of them bled and reddened and wounded the other during that time. "Let us leave off from this now, O Cuchulain," said Ferdiad. "Aye, let us leave off, if the time hath come," answered Cuchulain. So they ceased. They threw their arms from them into the hands of their charioteers.
Ga gasced irragam ifesta, a Chuchulaind, bar Fer diad. Let-su do roga gaiscid chaidche, bar Cuchulaind, dag is t doracht in n-th ar ts. Tiagam iarum, bar Fer diad, bar ar slegaib sneitti snasta slemunchradi go suanemnaib ln lanchatut indi. Tecam m cin, bar Cuchulaind. Is and-sin ra gabsatar da chotutscath chomdaingni forro. Dachuatar bar a slegaib snaitti snasta slemunchradi, go suanemnaib ln lanchotut indi. Ra gab cch db ac diburgun araile dina slegaib mide medoin lai go trth funid nna. Gia ra bi d'febas na himdegla, ra bi d'febas ind imdibairgthi, go ro fuilig & go ro forderg & go ra chrchtnaig cach db bar araile risin r sin. Scurem de sodain badesta, a Chuchulaind, bar Fer diad. Scurem m cin, ma thanic a thrath, bar Cuchulaind. Ra scoirsetar. Bhacheirdset a n-airm uathu illmaib a n-arad.

Thereupon each of them went toward the other in the middle of the ford, and each of them put his hand on the other's neck and gave him three kisses. Their horses were in one and the same paddock that night, and their charioteers at one and the same fire; and their charioteers made ready a litter-bed of fresh rushes for them with pillows for wounded men on them. Then came healing and curing folk to heal and to cure them, and they laid healing herbs and grasses and a curing charm on their cuts and stabs, their gashes and many wounds. Of every healing herb and grass and curing charm that was brought and was applied to the cuts and stabs, to the gashes and many wounds of Cuchulain, a like portion thereof he sent across the ford westward to Ferdiad, so that the men of Erin should not have it to say, should Ferdiad fall at his hands, it was more than his share of care had been given to him.
Tanic cach db d'indsaigid araile assa aithle & rabert cch db lm dar bragit araile & ra thairbir teora pc. Ra batar a n-eich i n-oenscur inn aidchi sin & a n-araid ic oentenid, acus bognisetar a n-araid cossair leptha rluachra dib go frithadartaib fer n-gona friu. Tancatar fiallach cci & legis da n-cc & da leiges, acus focherdetar lubi & lossa icci & slnsn ra cnedaib & ra crechtaib, r n-ltaib & ra n-ilgonaib. Cach lib & cach lossa cci & slnsen ra berthea ra cnedaib & crechtaib, altaib & ilgonaib Conculaind, ra idnaicthea comraind ad db dar ath siar d'Fir diad, nar abbraitis fir hErend, da tuitted Fer diad lessium, ba himmarcraid legis daberad fair.

Of every food and of every savoury, soothing and strong drink that was brought by the men of Erin to Ferdiad, a like portion thereof he sent over the ford northwards to Cuchulain; for the purveyors of Ferdiad were more numerous than the purveyors of Cuchulain. All the men of Erin were purveyors to Ferdiad, to the end that he might keep Cuchulain off from them. But only the inhabitants of Mag Breg ('the Plain of Breg') were purveyors to Cuchulain. They were wont to come daily, that is, every night, to converse with him.
Cach biad & cach lind sola socharchin somesc daberthea o feraib hErend d'Fir diad, da idnaicthea comraind uad db dar th fa thuaith do Choinchulaind, daig raptar lia biattaig Fir diad and battaig Conculaind. Raptar biattaig fir hErend uli d'Fir diad ar Choinculaind do dingbil db. Raptar biattaig Brega dana do Choinculaind. Tictis da acaldaim fri d .i. cach n-aidche.

They bided there that night. Early on the morrow they arose and went their ways to the ford of combat. "To what weapons shall we resort on this day, O Ferdiad?" asked Cuchulain. "Thine is the choosing of weapons," Ferdiad made answer, "because it was I had my choice of weapons on the day aforegone." "Let us take, then," said Cuchulain, "to our great, well-tempered lances to-day, for we think that the thrusting will bring nearer the decisive battle to-day than did the casting of yesterday. Let our horses be brought to us and our chariots yoked, to the end that we engage in combat over our horses and chariots on this day." "Aye, let us go so," Ferdiad assented.
Dessetar and inn aidchi sin. Atrchtatar go moch arna barach, & tncatar rompu co th in chomraic. Ga gasced ara ragam indiu a Fir diad, bar Cuchulaind. Lett-su do roga n-gascid chaidchi, bar Fer diad, dag is missi barroega mo roga n-gascid isind lathi luid. Tiagam iarum, bar Cuchulaind, bar ar mnaisib mra murniucha indiu, dig is foicsiu lind don g in t-imrubad indiu anda dond imdiburgun inn. Gabtar ar n-eich dn & indliter ar carpait, co n-dernam cathugud dar n-echaib & dar carptib indiu. Tecam m cin, bar Fer diad.

Thereupon they girded two full-firm broadshields on them for that day. They took to their great, well-tempered lances on that day. Either of them began to pierce and to drive, to throw and to press down the other, from early morning's twilight till the hour of evening's close. If it were the wont for birds in flight to fly through the bodies of men, they could have passed through their bodies on that day and carried away pieces of blood and flesh through their wounds and their sores into the clouds and the air all around. And when the hour of evening's close was come, their horses were spent and their drivers were wearied, and they themselves, the heroes and warriors of valour, were exhausted. "Let us give over now, O Ferdiad," said Cuchulain, "for our horses are spent and our drivers tired, and when they are exhausted, why should we too not be exhausted?" And in this wise he spake, and he uttered these words at that place:
Is and-sin ra gabsatar d lethanscath landangni forro in l sin. Dachuatar bar a manisib mra murnecha in l sin. Ra gab cch db bar tollad & bar tregdad, bar ruth & bar regtad araile, dorblas na matne muchi go trth funid nna. Da m-bad bs oin ar luamain do thecht tri chorpaib dene, doragtas tri na corpaib in l sin, go m-brtais na tochta fola & fola tri na cnedaib & tri na crechtaib innlaib & i n-aeraib sechtair. Acus a thnic trath funid nna, raptar sctha a n-eich & raptar mertnig a n-araid & raptar sctha-som fadessin na curaid & na lith gaile. Scurem de sodain badesta a Fir diad, bar Cuchulaind, dag isat sctha ar n-eich & it mertnig ar n-araid, acus in trth ata sctha iat, cid dnni na bad sctha sind dana. Acus is amlaid ra bi g rd & rabert na briathra and:


"We need not our chariots break--
This, a struggle fit for giants.
Place the hobbles on the steeds,
Now that din of arms is o'er!" Ni dlegar dn cuclaigi, bar siun,
ra fomorchaib feidm.
curther fthu a n-urchomail,
a ro scich a n-deilm.
"Yea, we will cease, if the time hath come," replied Ferdiad. They ceased then. They threw their arms away from them into the hands of their charioteers. Each of them came towards his fellow. Each laid his hand on the other's neck and gave him three kisses. Their horses were in the one pen that night, and their charioteers at the one fire. Their charioteers prepared two litter-beds of fresh rushes for them with pillows for wounded men on them. The curing and healing men came to attend and watch and mark them that night; for naught else could they do, because of the direfulness of their cuts and their stabs, their gashes and their numerous wounds, but apply to them philtres and spells and charms, to staunch their blood and their bleeding and their deadly pains. Of every magic potion and every spell and every charm that was applied to the cuts and stabs of Cuchulain, their like share he sent over the ford westwards to Ferdiad. Of every food and every savoury, soothing and strong drink that was brought by the men of Erin to Ferdiad, an equal portion he sent over the ford northwards to Cuchulain, for the victuallers of Ferdiad were more numerous than the victuallers of Cuchulain. For all the men of Erin were Ferdiad's nourishers, to the end that he might ward off Cuchulain from them. But the indwellers of the Plain of Breg alone were Cuchulain's nourishers. They were wont to come daily, that is, every night, to converse with him.
Scoirem m cin, m thnic a thrth, bar Fer diad. Ra scorsetar. Facheirdset a n-airm uathu illmaib a n-arad. Tanic cch db d'innaigid a cheile. Ra bert cach lam dar brgit araile, & ra thairbir teora pc. Ra btar a n-eich i n-oenscur in aidchi sin, & a n-araid oc oentenid. Bgniset a n-araid cossair leptha rluachra dib go frithadartaib fer n-gona friu. Tancatar fiallach icci & leigis da fethium & da fgad & d forcomt inn aidchi sin, dag n n aile ra chumgetar dib, ra hacbeile a cned & a crechta, a n-lta & a n-ilgona, acht iptha & le & arthana do chur riu, do thairmesc a fola & a fulliugu & a n-gae cr. Cach iptha & gach le & gach orthana doberthea ra cnedaib & ra crectaib Conculaind, ra idnaicthea comraind uad db dar th siar d'Fir diad. Cach biad & cach lind sola socharchain somesc ra berthea o feraib hErend do Fir diad, ra hidnaicthea comraind ad db dar th fothuaith do Choinchulaind, daig raptar lia biataig Fir diad anda biataig Conculaind, daig raptar biattaig fir hErend uile d'Fir diad ar dingbhail Conculaind db. Raptar biataig Brega no do Choinchulaind. Tictis da acallaim fri d .i. cach n-aidche.

They abode there that night. Early on the morrow they arose and repaired to the ford of combat. Cuchulain marked an evil mien and a dark mood that day on Ferdiad. "It is evil thou appearest to-day, O Ferdiad," spake Cuchulain; "thy hair has become dark to-day, and thine eye has grown drowsy, and thine upright form and thy features and thy gait have gone from thee!" "Truly not for fear nor for dread of thee is that happened to me to-day," answered Ferdiad; "for there is not in Erin this day a warrior I could not repel!" And Cuchulain lamented and moaned, and he spake these words and Ferdiad responded:
Dessetar inn aidchi sin and. Atroachtatar co moch arna barach, & tncatar rempo co th in chomraic. Ra chondaic Cuchulaind mdelb & mthemel mr in la sin bar Fer diad. Is olc atai-siu indiu a Fir diad, bar Cuchulaind. Ra dorchaig th'folt indi & ra suanmig do rosc & dachuaid do chruth & do delb & do denam dt. Nir th'ecla-su na ar th'uamain form-sa sain indiu m, bar Fer diad, dig ni fuil i n-hErind indiu laech na dingeb-sa. Acus ra bi Cuchulaind ac cini & ac airchisecht & rabert na briathra and & ra recair Fer diad:

Cuchulain: "Ferdiad, ah, if it be thou,
Well I know thou'rt doomed to die!
To have gone at woman's hest,
Forced to fight thy comrade sworn!"
Ferdiad: "O Cuchulain-- wise decree--
Loyal champion, hero true,
Each man is constrained to go
'Neath the sod that hides his grave!"

Cuchulain: "Finnabair, Medb's daughter fair,
Stately maiden though she be,
Not for love they'll give to thee,
But to prove thy kingly might!"

Ferdiad: "Provd was my might long since,
Cu of gentle spirit thou.
Of one braver I've not heard;
Till to-day I have not found!"

Cuchulain: "Thou art he provoked this fight,
Son of Daman, Dar's son,
To have gone at woman's word,
Swords to cross with thine old friend!"

Ferdiad: "Should we then unfought depart,
Brothers though we are, bold Hound,
Ill would be my word and fame
With Ailill and Cruachan's Medb!"

Cuchulain: "Food has not yet passed his lips,
Nay nor has he yet been born,
Son of king or blameless queen,
For whom I would work thee harm!"

Ferdiad: "Culann's Hound, with floods of deeds,
Medb, not thou, hath us betrayed;
Fame and victory thou shalt have;
Not on thee we lay our fault!"

Cuchulain: "Clotted gore is my brave heart,
Near I'm parted from my soul;
Wrongful 'tis-- with hosts of deeds--
Ferdiad, dear, to fight with thee!"
Cc.: A Fir diad masa th,
demin limm isat lomthru
tidaeht ar comairli mn
do chomlund rit chomalta.
F.: A Chuchulaind, comall n-gith,
a frnraith, a firlaich,
is eicen do neoch a thecht
cosin ft forsa m-b a thiglecht.

Cc.: Findabair ingea Medba,
gia beith d'febas a delba,
a tabairt dait n ar do sheirc
act do romad do rigneirt.

F.: Fromtha mo nert a chanaib,
a Ch cosin caemriagail,
nech bad chalmu noco closs,
cosindiu no con fuaross.

Cc.: Tu fodera a fail de
a meic Damain meic Dre
tiachtain ar comairle mn
d'imchlaidbed rit chomalta.

F.: Da scaraind gan troit is t,
gidar comaltai a chaemch,
bud olc mo briathar is mo blad
ie Ailill is ac Meidb Chruachan.

Cc.: Noco tard bad da blaib
is noco mo ro genair,
do rg na rgain can chess,
bhar a n-dernaird-sea th'amles.

F.: A Chuchulaind tlaib gal,
n tu acht Medb rar marnestar,
bra-su buaid acus blaid,
n fort att ar cinaid.

Cc.:Is cap cr ino chride cain,
bec nach rascloss ram anmain,
n comnairt limin lnib gal
comrac rit a Fir diad.

"How much soever thou findest fault with me to-day," said Ferdiad, "it will be as an offset to my prowess." And he said, "To what weapons shall we resort to-day?" "With thyself is the choice of weapons to-day," replied Cuchulain, "for it is I that chose on the day gone by." "Let us resort, then," said Ferdiad, "to our heavy, hard-smiting swords this day, for we trow that the smiting each other will bring us nearer to the decision of battle to-day than was our piercing each other on yesterday." "Let us go then, by all means," responded Cuchulain.
Meid ati-siu ac cessacht form-sa indiu, bar Fer diad, ga gasced for a ragam indiu. Lett-su do roga gascid chaidchi indiu, bar Cuchulaind, dig is missi barrega in lathe luid. Tiagam iaram, bar Fer diad, bar ar claidbib tromma tortbullecha indiu, dig is facsiu lind dond g inn imslaidi indiu and dond imrubad ind. Tecam m cin, bar Cuchulaind.

Then they took two full-great long-shields upon them for that day. They turned to their heavy, hard-smiting swords. Each of them fell to strike and to hew, to lay low and cut down, to slay and undo his fellow, till as large as the head of a month-old child was each lump and each cut, that each of them took from the shoulders and thighs and shoulder-blades of the other.
Is and-sain ra gabsatar d leborscath lnmra forro in l sain. Dochuatar bar a claidbib tromma tortbullecha. Ra gab cch db bar slaide & bar slechtad, bar airlech & bar slechtad, bar airlech & bar essorgain, go m-ba metithir ri cend meic ms cach thothocht & gach thinmi dobeired cch db de gallib & de slastaib & de slinnocaib araile.

Each of them was engaged in smiting the other in this way from the twilight of early morning till the hour of evening's close. "Let us leave off from this now, O Cuchulain!" cried Ferdiad. "Aye, let us leave off, if the hour has come," said Cuchulain. They parted then, and threw their arms away from them into the hands of their charioteers. Though it had been the meeting of two happy, blithe, cheerful, joyful men, their parting that night was of two that were sad, sorrowful and full of suffering. Their horses were not in the same paddock that night. Their charioteers were not at the same fire.
Ra gab cch db ac slaide araile mn cir sin a dorblass na matni muchi co trth funid nna. Scurem do sodain badesta a Chuchulaind, bar Fer diad. Scorem m cin, ma thanic a thrth, bar Cuchulaind. Ra scorsetar, facheirdsetar a n-airm adaib illamaib a n-arad. Girbho chomraicthi da subach smach sobbrnach somenmnach, ra pa da scarthain da n-dubach n-dobbrnach n-domenmnach a scarthain inn aidchi sin. Ni ra batar a n-eich i n-oenscur inn aidchi sin. Ni ra batar a n-araid ac oentenid.

They passed there that night. It was then that Ferdiad arose early on the morrow and went alone to the ford of combat. For he knew that that would be the decisive day of the battle and combat; and he knew that one or other of them would fall there that day, or that they both would fall. It was then he donned his battle-weed of battle and fight and combat, or ever Cuchulain came to meet him. And thus was the manner of this harness of battle and fight and combat: He put his silken, glossy trews with its border of speckled gold, next to his white skin. Over this, outside, he put his brown-leathern, well-sewed kilt. Outside of this he put a huge, goodly flag, the size of a millstone. He put his solid, very deep, iron kilt of twice molten iron over the huge, goodly flag as large as a millstone, through fear and dread of the Gae Bulga on that day.
Dessetar inn aidchi sin and. Is and-sin atruacht Fer diad go moch arna barach acus tanic reme a oenur co ath in chomraic, dag ra fitir rap -sin la etergleid in chomlaind & in chomraic & ra fitir co taetsad nechtar de db in la sain and, no co taetsaitis a n-ds. Is and-sin ra gabastar-som a chatherriud catha & comlaind & comraic immi re tiachtain do Choinchulaind d saigid. Acus bha don chatherriud chatha & chomlaind & comraic: Ra gabastar a fuathbric srebnaide sril cona cimais d'r bricc fa fri gelchness. Ra gabastar a fuathbric n-dondlethair n-degshuata tairrside immaich anechtair. Ra gabastar muadchloich mir mti clochi mulind tarrsi-side immuich anechtair. Ra gabastar a fuathbric n-imdanhgin n-imdomain n-iarnaide do iurn athlegtha dar in muadchloich mir mti clochi mulind ar ecla & ar uamun in gae bulga in la sin.

About his head he put his crested war-cap of battle and fight and combat, whereon were forty carbuncle-gems beautifully adorning it and studded with red-enamel and crystal and rubies and with shining stones of the Eastern world. His angry, fierce-striking spear he seized in his right hand. On his left side he hung his curved battle-falchion, with its golden pommel and its rounded hilt of red gold. On the arch-slope of his back he slung his massive, fine-buffalo shield of a warrior, whereon were fifty bosses, wherein a boar could be shown in each of its bosses, apart from the great central boss of red gold. Ferdiad performed diverse, brilliant, manifold, marvellous feats on high that day, unlearned from any one before, neither from foster-mother nor from foster-father, neither from Scathach nor from Uathach nor from Aif, but he found them of himself that day in the face of Cuchulain.
Ra gabastar a chrchathbarr catha & comlaind & comraic imma chend, barsa m-batar cethracha gemm carrmocail ac chanchumtuch, arna ecur de chruan & christaill & carrmocul & de lubib soillsi airthir bethad. Ra gabastar a sleig m-barnig m-bairendbailc ina deslim. Ra gabastar a chlaideb camthuagach catha bar a chlu cona urdorn ir & cona muleltaib de dergr. Ra gabastar a scath mr m-buabalchin bar a tuagleirg a dromma, barsa m-batar cica cobrad, bar a tillfed torc taisse(l)btha bar cach comraid db, cenmotha in comraid mir medonaig do dergr. Bacheird Fer diad clesrada na ilerda ingantacha imda bar aird in l sain, nad roeglaind ac nech aile ram, ac mumme na ac aite, na ac Scthaig nach ac Uathaig na ac Aife, acht a n-denum uad fin in la sain i n-agid Conculainn.

Cuchulain likewise came to the ford, and he beheld the various, brilliant, manifold, wonderful feats that Ferdiad performed on high. "Thou seest yonder, O Laeg my master, the divers, bright, numerous, marvellous feats that Ferdiad performs on high, and I shall receive yon feats one after the other. And, therefore, if defeat be my lot this day, do thou prick me on and taunt me and speak evil to me, so that the more my spirit and anger shall rise in me. If, however, before me his defeat takes place, say thou so to me and praise me and speak me fair, to the end that the greater may be my courage!" "It shall surely be done so, if need be, O Cucuc," Laeg answered.
Dariacht Cuchulaind dochum inn atha no, acus ra chonnaic na clesrada na ilerda ingantacha imda bacheird Fer diad bar aird. Atchi-siu st, a mo phopa Laig, na clesrada na ilerda ingantacha imda focheird Fer diad bar aird, & bocotidfer dam-sa ar n-uair innossa na clesrada t, & is aire-sin, mad forum-sa bus ren indiu, ara n-derna-su mo grsad & mo glmad & olc do rada rim, go rop mite er m'fr & m'fergg foromm. Mad romum bus ren no, ara n-derna-su mo mnod & mo molod & maithius do rd frim, go rop mti lim mo menma. Dagentar m cin a Chucuc, bar Laeg.

Then Cuchulain, too, girded his war-harness of battle and fight and combat about him, and performed all kinds of splendid, manifold, marvellous feats on high that day which he had not learned from any one before, neither with Scathach nor with Uathach nor with Aif.
Is and-sin ra gabastar Cuchulaind dno a chatherriud chatha & chomlaind & comraic imbi acus focheird clesrada na ilerda ingantacha imda bar aird in l sain nad roeglaind ac neoch aile ram, ac Scthaig na ac Uathaig na ac Aife.

Ferdiad observed those feats, and he knew they would be plied against him in turn. "To what weapons shall we resort to-day, Ferdiad?" asked Cuchulain. "With thee is thy choice of weapons," Ferdiad responded. "Let us go to the 'Feat of the Ford,' then," said Cuchulain. "Aye, let us do so," answered Ferdiad. Albeit Ferdiad spoke that, he deemed it the most grievous thing whereto he could go, for he knew that in that sort Cuchulain used to destroy every hero and every battle-soldier who fought with him in the 'Feat of the Ford.'
Atchondairc Fer diad na clesrada sain & ra fitir go fuigbithea d arn-uir iat. Ga gasced ar a ragam a Fir diad, bar Cuchulaind. Lett-su do roga gascid chaidchi, bar Fer diad. Tiagam far cluchi inn tha iarum, bar Cuchulaind. Tecam m, bar Fer diad. Gitubairt Fer diad inn sein, is air is doilgiu leis daragad, dig ra fitir iss ass ra forrged Cuchulaind cach caur & cach cathmilid condriced friss bar cluch (i) inn tha.

Great indeed was the deed that was done on the ford that day. The two heroes, the two champions, the two chariot-fighters of the west of Europe, the two bright torches of valour of the Gael, the two hands of dispensing favour and of giving rewards in the west of the northern world, the two veterans of skill and the two keys of bravery of the Gael, to be brought together in encounter as from afar, through the sowing of dissension and the incitement of Ailill and Medb. Each of them was busy hurling at the other in those deeds of arms from early morning's gloaming till the middle of noon. When mid-day came, the rage of the men became wild, and each drew nearer to the other.
Ba mr in gnm m daringned barsind ath in l sain. Na da niad, na da anruith, da eirrgi iarthair Eorpa, da anchaindil gascid Gaedel, da lam thidnaicthi ratha & tairberta [&] tuarastail iarthair thuascirt in domain, da nchaindil gascid Gaedel & da eochair gascid Gaedel, a comraicthi do chin mir tri indlach & etarchossit Ailella & Medba. Da gab cch db ac dburgun araile do na clesraidib sin a dorbblass na matni muchi go midi medoin li and. thnic medn li, ra feochraigesetar fergga na fer & ra chomfaicsigestar cach db d'araile.

Thereupon Cuchulain gave one spring once from the bank of the ford till he stood upon the boss of Ferdiad macDaman's shield, seeking to reach his head and to strike it from above over the rim of the shield. Straightway Ferdiad gave the shield a blow with his left elbow, so that Cuchulain went from him like a bird onto the brink of the ford. Again Cuchulain sprang from the brink of the ford, so that he alighted upon the boss of Ferdiad macDaman's shield, that he might reach his head and strike it over the rim of the shield from above. Ferdiad gave the shield a thrust with his left knee, so that Cuchulain went from him like an infant onto the bank of the ford.
Is andsin cindis Cuchulaind fecht n-oen and do ur inn atha go m-bi far cobraid sceith Fir diad meic Damin do thetractain a chind do bualad dar bil in scith ar n-uachtur. Is and-sin ra bert Fer diad bem da ullind cl sin scath, com-das-rala Cuchulaind ad mar n bar ur inn tha. Cindis Cuchulaind d'ur inn tha ars, co m-bi far cobraid scith Fir diad meic Damin do thetarrachtain a chind do bualad dar bil in scith ar n-uachtur. Ra bert Fer diad bim da gln chl sin sciath, gom-das-rala Cuchulaind uad mar inac m-bec bar ur inn tha.

Laeg espied that. "Woe then, Cuchulain!" cried Laeg; "meseems the battle-warrior that is against thee hath shaken thee as a fond woman shakes her child. He hath washed thee as a cup is washed in a tub. He hath ground thee as a mill grinds soft malt. He hath pierced thee as a tool bores through an oak. He hath bound thee as the bindweed binds the trees. He hath pounced on thee as a hawk pounces on little birds, so that no more hast thou right or title or claim to valour or skill in arms till the very day of doom and of life, thou little imp of an elf-man!" cried Laeg.
Arigis Laeg inn sein. Amac ale, bar Lag, rat chur in cathmilid fail itt agid mar chras ben bid a mac. Rot snigestar mar snegair cuip a lundu. Rat melestar mar miles mulend muadbraich. Ratregdastar mar thregdas fodb omnaid. Rat nascestar mar nasces feth fidu. Ras leic fort feib ras lec seg for mintu, connach fail do dluig na d dal na do dl ri gail na ra gaisced go brunni m-bratha & betha badesta, a siriti siabarthi bic, bar Leg.

Thereat for the third time, Cuchulain arose with the speed of the wind, and the swiftness of a swallow, and the dash of a dragon, and the strength (of a lion) into the clouds of the air, til he alighted on the boss of the shield of Ferdiad son of Daman, so as to reach his head that he might strike it from above over the rim of his shield. Then it was that the battle-warrior gave the shield a violent and powerful shake, so that Cuchulain flew from it into the middle of the ford, the same as if he had not sprung at all.
Is and-sain atraacht Cuchulaind illas na gaithi & i n-athlaimi na fandli & i n-dremni in drecain & innirt inn aeir in tresfecht, go m-bi far comraid scith Fir diad meic Damain do thetarrachtain a chind da bualad dar bil a scith ar n-uachtur. Is and-sin ra bert in cathmilid crothad barsin scath, com-das-rala Cuchulaind ad bar lr inn tha, mar bad nacharlebhad ram itir.

It was then the first twisting-fit of Cuchulain took place, so that a swelling and inflation filled him like breath in a bladder, until he made a dreadful, terrible, many-coloured, wonderful bow of himself, so that as big as a giant or a man of the sea was the hugely-brave warrior towering directly over Ferdiad.
Is and-sin ra chtriastrad im Choinculaind, go ros ln att & infithsi mar anl ills, co n-derna thaig n-uathmar n-acbil n-ildathaig n-ingantaig de, go m-ba metithir ra fomir na ra fer mara in milid mrchalma os chind Fir diad i certairddi.

Such was the closeness of the combat they made, that their heads encountered above and their feet below and their hands in the middle over the rims and bosses of the shields. Such was the closeness of the combat they made, that their shields burst and split from their rims to their centres. Such was the closeness of the combat they made, that their spears bent and turned and shivered from their tips to their rivets.
Ba se dlus n-imairic daronsatar, go ra chomraicsetar a cind ar n-uactur & a cossa ar n-ctur & allma ar n-irmedn dar bilib & chobradaib na sciath. Ba s dlus n-imaric daronsatar, go ro dluigset & go ro dloingset a sceith a m-bile go a m-brntib. Ba s dlus n-imaric daronsatar, go ro fillsetar & go ro lpsatar & go ro guasaigsetar a slega a rennad go a semannaib.

Such was the closeness of the combat they made, that the boccanach and the bananach and the sprites of the glens and the eldritch beings of the air screamed from the rims of their shields and from the guards of their swords and from the tips of their spears.
Ba s dls n-imaric daronsatar, go ra grsetar boccanaig & bananaig & geniti glinni & demna aeir do bhilib a scath & d'imdornaib a claideb & d'erlonnaib a slega.

Such was the closeness of the combat they made, that they forced the river out of its bed and out of its course, so that there might have been a reclining place for a king or a queen in the middle of the ford, and not a drop of water was in it but what fell there with the trampling and slipping which the two heroes and the two battle-warriors made in the middle of the ford.
Ba se dls n-imaric daronsatar, go ra lasetar in n-ab-(aind assa) curp & assa cumacta go (m-)ba (hionadh iondlaicthi) do rg n rgain ar lr inn tha, connach bi banna dh'usci and acht muni siled ind, risin suathfadaig & risin sloetradaig daringsetar na da curaid & na da cathmilid bar lr in tha.

Such was the closeness of the combat they made, that the steeds of the Gael broke loose affrighted and plunging with madness and fury, so that their chains and their shackles, their traces and tethers snapped, and the women and children and pygmy-folk, the weak and the madmen among the men of Erin broke out through the camp southwestward.
Ba s dls n-imaric daronsatar, go ro memaid do graigib Gaedel scroin & sceinmnig, diallaib & dsacht, go ro maidset a n-idi & a n-erchomail, allomna & allethrenna, go ro memaid de mnib & maccaemaib & mindoenib, midlaigib & meraigib fer n-hErend trisin dunud siar-dess.

At that time they were at the edge-feat of swords. It was then Ferdiad caught Cuchulain in an unguarded moment, and he gave him a thrust with his tusk-hilted blade, so that he buried it in his breast, and his blood fell into his belt, till the ford became crimsoned with the clotted blood from the battle-warrior's body. Cuchulain endured it not under Ferdiad's attack, with his death-bringing, heavy blows, and his long strokes and his mighty, middle slashes at him.
Batar sun ar faebarchless claideb risin r sin. Is and-sin ra sacht Fer diad uair baeguil and fecht far Coinculaind, & ra bert bim din chulg dt d, go ra folaig na chlab, go torchair a chr na chriss, corbh forruammanda in t-th do chr a chuirp in chathmiled. Ni faerlangair Cuchulaind an sein, a ra gab Fer diad bar a brthbalcbemmennaib & ftalbemmennaib & madalbemmennaib mra fair.

Then Cuchulain bethought him of his friends from the Faery land and of his mighty folk who would come to defend him and of his scholars to protect him, what time he would be hard pressed in the combat. It was then that Dolb and Indolb arrived to help and to succour their friend, namely Cuchulain. Then it was that Ferdiad felt the onset of the three together smiting his shield against him, and he gave all his care and attention thereto, and thence he called to mind that, when they were with Scathach and with Uathach [learning together, Dolb and Indolb used to come to help Cuchulain out of every stress wherein he was.]
Ro smuainestar Cuchulainn a sidhchairdi agus a cumachtaib do tocht da chosnamh agus a descibail d ditin, an tan badh airc d isin comlunn. Is ann sin do riacht Dolb & Indolb d'furtacht & d'foirithin a ccarat .i. Concculainn. Is ann sin do mothaig Fer diad tinsaitin an trr an aoinfeacht ac tuarcain a sceith fair, agus do rat da uidh agus da aire , agus as as ro fitir .i. an tan ro batar ic Scthaigh agus ic Uathaigh.

Ferdiad spake: "Not alike are our foster-brothership and our comradeship O Cuchulain," quoth he. "How so, then?" asked Cuchulain. "Thy friends of the Fairy-folk have succoured thee, and thou didst not disclose them to me before," said Ferdiad. "Not easy for me were that," answered Cuchulain; "for if the magic veil be once revealed to one of the sons of Mile, none of the Tuatha De Danann will have power to practise concealment or magic. And why complainest thou here, Ferdiad?" said Cuchulain. "Thou hast a horn skin whereby to multiply feats and deeds of arms on me, and thou hast not shown me how it is closed or how it is opened." Then it was they displayed all their skill and secret cunning to one another, so that there was not a secret of either of them kept from the other except the Gae Bulga, which was Cuchulain's.
Adubairt Fer diad: Ni cuttrama ar ccomaltus no ar ccompntus a Cuchulainn, ar s. Cidh esen itir, ar Cuchulainn. Do carait sdhchaire-si gut thathaigi & nior taispenais damsa riam iet, ar Fer diad. Ni fuil urusa damsa ann sin, ar Cuchulainn, uair d ttaisbentar in fth fiadha aoinfeacht do nech do macaibh Miledh, nocha bia gabail re diamair no re draideacht ic nech do Tuathaib De Danann, & cid tusa ann, ata congancnes agat d'iomarcadh cles agus gaisgidh toramsa, et nior taispenais damhsa a iadhadh no a foslaccadh, gurab ann sin do taispensit a n-uile gliocas agus derridacht da chle, conach raibhi diamair caic diob ag aroile acht mad in gae bulga ic Coinchulainn.

Howbeit, when the Fairy friends found Cuchulain had been wounded, each of them inflicted three great, heavy wounds on him, on Ferdiad, to wit. It was then that Ferdiad made a cast to the right, so that he slew Dolb with that goodly cast. Then followed the two woundings and the two throws that overcame him, till Ferdiad made a second throw towards Cuchulain's left, and with that throw he stretched low and killed Indolb dead on the floor of the ford. Hence it is that the story-teller sang the rann:

"Why is this called Ferdiad's Ford,
E'en though three men on it fell?
None the less it washed their spoils--
It is Dolb's and Indolb's Ford!" Cidh tra acht o fuaratar na sidhcairi Coinculainn arn chreachtnughudh, tugatar tri tromgona mora fair-siom o gach fer diob .i. for Fir n-diadh. Is ann sin do rat Fer diad ercar da dhes, gur marp Dolp don degerchar sin. Ro batar in da ghuin agus in da ercar ica forrach iersin, co d-tard Fer diad an dara hercar for cle Conculainn, cur trascar & cur tren-marbh Indolb ar lar an tha don ercur sin, gurab do sin ro chan an seanchaidh an rann:

Cret f n-abar Ath Fir diad
frisin ath gar thuit an triar.
Ni lugha rus nigh a fuidb
th Duilb agus th Induilb.
When the devoted equally great sires and champions, and the hard, battle-victorious wild beasts that fought for Cuchulain had fallen, it greatly strengthened the courage of Ferdiad, so that he gave two blows for every blow of Cuchulain's. When Laeg son of Riangabair saw his lord being overcome by the crushing blows of the champion who oppressed him, Laeg began to stir up and rebuke Cuchulain, in such a way that a swelling and an inflation filled Cuchulain from top to ground, as the wind fills a spread, open banner, so that he made a dreadful, wonderful bow of himself like a skybow in a shower of rain, and he made for Ferdiad with the violence of a dragon or the strength of a blood-hound.
Cidh tra acht o do roctatar na hetrecha caomha commora agus na beitrecha cruaidi cathbhuadacha batar iom Coinculainn, do nertaigh sin go mr menma Fir diad, go ttugadh da beim im gach m-bem do Coinculainn. Ot connairc Laogh mac Riangabra a tigherna aga traothadh do beimendaibh tuindsemacha in trenfir ro-das-timairc, ro gab Laogh ag griosadh agus ag glmadh Conculainn samlaidh, co ro lion att agus infisi Coinculainn amail linas gaoth onch bhl oslaicthi, go n-derna sduaigh n-uathbsaigh n-anaithnidh dhe amail sduaigh nimhi re frais fearthana, agus ro iondsaigh docum Fir diad mar dremne dreaccan no mar nert n-rcon.

And Cuchulain called for the Gae Bulga from Laeg son of Riangabair. This was its nature: With the stream it was made ready, and from between the fork of the foot it was cast; the wound of a single spear it gave when entering the body, and thirty barbs had it when it opened and it could not be drawn out of a man's flesh till the flesh had been cut about it.
Acus conattacht in n-gae m-bulga bar Laeg mac Riangabra. Is amlaid ra bi side, ra sruth ra indiltea & illadair ra teilgthea, lad oengae leis ac techt i n-duni & trchu farrindi ri taithmech, & ni gatta a curp duni go coscairthea immi.

Thereupon Laeg came forward to the brink of the river and to the place where the fresh water was dammed, and the Gae Bulga was sharpened and set in position. He filled the pool and stopped the stream and checked the tide of the ford. Ferdiad's charioteer watched the work, for Ferdiad had said to him early in the morning: "Now gilla, do thou hold back Laeg from me to-day, and I will hold back Cuchulain from thee." "This is a pity," quoth the henchman; "no match for him am I; for a man to combat a hundred is he, and that am I not. Still; however slight his help, it shall not come to his lord past me."
As annsin rainic Laogh roimhi go heochair-imlibh na habonn & co hionadh na forgabala ar in bh-fioruisgi agus geraighther agus in-dillter in gae bulga. Ro lion in lind agus ro fost in sruth agus ro coisc eascal in tha. Ro fechastar ara Fir diad in saothar sin, uair it bert Fer diad mochthrath ris: Maith a giolla, ar s, dingaib-si Logh dom-sa ani agus dingepat-sa Coinculainn dit-sa. Truag sin, ar in gilla, ni fer dingbala dh misi, uair is fer comlainn cet esiomh, agus nocha n-edh misi. Gidhedh chena nocha ria a beag da congnam-somh g thigerna tarorsa.

He was then watching his brother thus making the dam till he filled the pools and went to set the Gae Bulga downwards. It was then that Id went up and released the stream and opened the dam and undid the fixing of the Gae Bulga. Cuchulain became deep purple and red all over when he saw the setting undone on the Gae Bulga. He sprang from the top of the ground so that he alighted light and quick on the rim of Ferdiad's shield. Ferdiad gave a strong shake to the shield, so that he hurled Cuchulain the measure of nine paces out to the westward over the ford.
Boi-siomh in trth sin ic fechadh a bhrthar no, gur linastair na linti agus go n-dechaidh d'indioll an gae bulga sos. As ann sin do choidh Idh sus, agus do sgaoil ar in sruth agus ro fosgail an forgabail agus do leg indioll an gae builg. Do ruamhnaigedh agus do roderccadh iom Coinculainn, t connairc a indioll ar n-dul n gae bulga. Ro lingestair do maoilind talman, go raibhi ar bile sgeith Fir diad go hurettrom athlamh. Do rat Fer diad crothadh ar in sgeith, gur thelg Coinculainn modh noi cceimenn tar in th sar sechtair.

Then Cuchulain called and shouted to Laeg to set about preparing the Gae Bulga for him. Laeg hastened to the pool and began the work. Id ran and opened the dam and released it before the stream. Laeg sprang at his brother and they grappled on the spot. Laeg threw Id and handled him sorely, for he was loath to use weapons upon him. Ferdiad pursued Cuchulain westwards over the ford. Cuchulain sprang on the rim of the shield. Ferdiad shook the shield, so that he sent Cuchulain the space of nine paces eastwards over the ford.
Is ann sin garthais agus grchais Cuchulainn ar Laogh ag gabail laimhe fair iman gae bulga d'innioll d. Reathais Laogh gus an linn agus rus gabh fuirre. Rethais Idh agus ro foslaic riasan sruth, agus ro sgail in cora. Scindis Laogh g bhrthair, & ro comruicsit ar in lathair sin. Leagais Laogh Idh, agns easonoraighis co mor , ir nior bh'il les airm d'imbirt fair. Lenais Fer diad Coinculainn tar th siar. Linccis Cuchulainn tar bile in sgeth. Crothais Fer diad in sgiath, gur cuir Coinculain mod noi cemend tar th soir.

Cuchulain called and shouted to Laeg. Laeg attempted to come, but Ferdiad's charioteer let him not, so that Laeg turned on him and left him on the sedgy bottom of the ford. He gave him many a heavy blow with clenched fist on the face and countenance, so that he broke his mouth and his nose and put out his eyes and his sight. And forthwith Laeg left him and filled the pool and checked the stream and stilled the noise of the river's voice, and set in position the Gae Bulga. After some time Ferdiad's charioteer arose from his death-cloud, and set his hand on his face and countenance, and he looked away towards the ford of combat and saw Laeg fixing the Gae Bulga. He ran again to the pool and made a breach in the dike quickly and speedily, so that the river burst out in its booming, bounding, bellying, bank-breaking billows making its own wild course. Cuchulain became purple and red all over when he saw the setting of the Gae Bulga had been disturbed, and for the third time he sprang from the top of the ground and alighted on the edge of Ferdiad's shield, so as to strike him over the shield from above. Ferdiad gave a blow with his left knee against the leather of the bare shield, so that Cuchulain was thrown into the waves of the ford.
Garthais agus grechais Cuchulainn ar Laogh. Fabrais Laogh a iondsaighe agus nior leic ara Fir diad dh cur ro iompdh fris agus cur ro leacc for osarlar an tha. Toirbiris moeldorna mora mionea tar a gnis agus tar a aghaidh, cur bris a bl agus a srn, agus cur saobh a rosc agus a radharc, agus toed uadha asa haithle agus ro lon an lind agus ro fost an sruth agus ro choisc glorgrith na habond agus ro indill an gae bulga. arsin ergis ara Fir diad asa thaimhnll agus tuc lamh tar a gnis agus tar a aghaidh, agus ro fch adha ar th in comlainn agus it connairc Laogh [uadha] ag indell an gae builg. Rethais iaromh cus in lind, cur ro bearn an cloidhe co tric tinnesnach, cur meabaidh don abhainn ina buindeadhaibh borbghloracha bedccarda bangdlithi bruachbristeacha ar amus a baoithreme bunaidh. Do raimnigedh agus do rodherccadh iom Coinculainn, ot condairc a indell ar n-dul n gae bulga, cur lingeastar do maoilinn talman an tres feact co raibhi ar bile sceth Fir diad dia bualadh tar in sgieth anas. Do rat Fer diad buille d gln cl i leathair an loimscth go ttarla Cuchulainn fo lintip an atha.

Thereupon Ferdiad gave three severe woundings to Cuchulain. Cuchulain cried and shouted loudly to Laeg to make ready the Gae Bulga for him. Laeg attempted to get near it, but Ferdiad's charioteer prevented him. Then Laeg grew very wroth at his brother and he made a spring at him, and he closed his long, full-valiant hands over him, so that he quickly threw him to the ground and straightway bound him. And then he went from him quickly and courageously, so that he filled the pool and stayed the stream and set the Gae Bulga. And he cried out to Cuchulain that it was served, for it was not to be discharged without a quick word of warning before it. Hence it is that Laeg cried out:--

"Ware! beware the Gae Bulga,
Battle-winning Culann's hound!" [et reliqua] Is ann sin do rat Fer diad teora tromghonta for Coinculainn. Garthais agus grchais Cuchulainn ar Laogh ag gabail lama fair iman gae bulga do inneall d. Fuabrais Laogh a iondsaighe, agus nir lcc ara Fir diad d. Ferccaigther Laogh fris ann sin agus beris sidhe da iondsaighe agus iadhais a lamha leabra langasda tairis, gur ro trascar co athlamh agus ro trascar fo cetir. Agus taot uadha co solamh sarcalma, cur ro lon an lind agus ro fost in sruth agus ro indill in gae bulga, agus ro fuaccar do Coinculainn a frithoileamh, uair ni tabhartha gan recne rabaid roimi, conadh aire sin atbert Laogh:

Fomhna fomhna an gae bulga
a Cuchulainn cathbhadaigh & rl.
Then it was that Cuchulain let fly the white Gae Bulga from the fork of his irresistible right foot. Ferdiad prepared for the feat according to the testimony thereof. He lowered his shield, so that the spear went over its edge into the watery, water-cold river. And he looked at Cuchulain, and he saw all his various, venomous feats made ready, and he knew not to which of them he should first give answer, whether to the 'Fist's breast-spear,' or to the 'Wild shield's broad-spear,' or to the 'Short spear from the middle of the palm,' or to the white Gae Bulga over the fair, watery river.
Is ann sin ro frithoileastar Cuchulainn an bangae bulca tre ladhair a choisi dghraisi deisi. Frithilis Fer diad in cles do rer a testa. Do rat in sgiath sios, co tainic tar bile in sgeith isin sruth linnide liondfhar. Agus sillis ar Coinculainn agus at connairc a ilcleasa neme uile ar indell aicci, agus ni raibhi a fios aige, cia dhobh dho frecceoradh ar tus, ane in cliabgae glaici n in an leathangae loindsgth no an certgae do lar a bhoisi no an an bangae bulga tresan sruth n-alainn n-uiseidhi.

Ferdiad heard the Gae Bulga called for. He thrust his shield down to protect the lower part of his body. Cuchulain gripped the short spear, cast it off the palm of his hand over the rim of the shield and over the edge of the corselet and horn-skin, so that its farther half was visible after piercing his heart in his bosom. Ferdiad gave a thrust of his shield upwards to protect the upper part of his body, though it was help that came too late. The gilla set the Gae Bulga down the stream, and Cuchulain caught it in the fork of his foot, and threw the Gae Bulga as far as he could cast underneath at Ferdiad, so that it passed through the strong, thick, iron apron of wrought iron, and broke in three parts the huge, goodly stone the size of a millstone, so that it cut its way through the body's protection into him, till every joint and every limb was filled with its barbs.
Acus atchuala Fer diad in n-gae m-bolga d'imrd. Ra bert bim din scath ss d'anacul chtair a chuirp. Boruaraid Cuchulaind in certgae, delgthi do lr a dernainni dar bil in sceth & dar brollach in chonganchnis, gor bo ren in leth n-alltarach de ar tregtad a chride na chlab. Ra bert Fer diad bim din scath sas d'anacul uactair a chuirp, giarb in chobair iar n-assu. Da indill in gilla in n-gae m-bolga risin sruth, & ra rithil Cuchulaind illadair a chossi & tarlaic rout n-urchoir de bar Fer nh-diad, co n-dechaid trisin fuathbhric n-imdanhgin n-imdomain n-iarnaide do iurn athlegtha, gorrebris in muadchloich mir miti clochi mulind i tr, co n-dechaid dar timthirecht a chuirp and, gor bho ln cach n-alt & cach n-ge de, d forrindib.

"Ah, that now sufficeth," sighed Ferdiad: "I am fallen of that! But, yet one thing more: mightily didst thou drive with thy right foot. And 'twas not fair of thee for me to fall by thy hand." And he yet spake and uttered these words:
Leor sain bhadesta ale, bar Fer diad, darochar-sa de sein. Acht at n chena, is t(r)n unnsi as do deiss, acus nr bo chir dait mo thuttimsea dot lim. Is amlaid ra bi ga rd & ra bert na briathra:

"O Cu of grand feats,
Unfairly I'm slain!
Thy guilt clings to me;
My blood falls on thee!
"No meed for the wretch
Who treads treason's gap.
Now weak is my voice;
Ah, gone is my bloom!

"My ribs' armour bursts,
My heart is all gore;
I battled not well;
I'm smitten, O Cu!
A Ch na cless cain,
nr dess dait mo guin,
lett in locht rom len,
is fort ra fer mh'fuil.
Ni lossat na troich
recait bernaid m-braith,
as galar mo guth,
uch doscarad scaith.

Mebait mh'asnae fuidb,
mo chride-se is cr,
nimath d'ferus bag,
darochar a Ch.

Thereupon Cuchulain hastened towards Ferdiad and clasped his two arms about him, and bore him with all his arms and his armour and his dress northwards over the ford, that so it should be with his face to the north of the ford the triumph took place and not to the south of the ford with the men of Erin. Cuchulain laid Ferdiad there on the ground, and a cloud and a faint and a swoon came over Cuchulain there by the head of Ferdiad. Laeg espied it, and the men of Erin all arose for the attack upon him. "Come, O Cucuc," cried Laeg; "arise now from thy trance, for the men of Erin will come to attack us, and it is not single combat they will allow us, now that Ferdiad son of Daman son of Dar is fallen by thee." "What availeth it me to arise, O gilla," moaned Cuchulain, "now that this one is fallen by my hand?" In this wise the gilla spake and he uttered these words and Cuchulain responded:
Ra bert Cuchulaind sidi da saigid assa aithle & ra iad a da lim tharis & tuargaib leiss cona arm & cona erriud & cona tgud dar th fa thuaid , go m-bad ra th a tuid ra beth in coscur & na bad ra th anar ac feraib hErend. Dalec Cuchulaind ar lr Fer n-diad and & darochair nl & tam & tassi bar Coinculaind as chind Fir diad and. Atchonnaic Leg ansin, acus atrigestar fir hErend uile do thichtain d saigid. Maith a Chucuc, bar Lag, comerig bhadesta & daroisset fir hErend dar saigid & ni ba cumland oenfir dmait dinn, a darochair Fer diad mac Damain meic Dare latsu. Can dam-sa irgi, a gillai, bar -sium, & int darochair limm. Is amlaid ra bi in gilla ga rd & ra bert na briathra and & ra recair Cuchulaind:

Laeg: "Now arise, O Emain's Hound;
Now most fits thee courage high.
Ferdiad hast thou thrown-- of hosts--
God's fate! How thy fight was hard!"
Cuchulain: What avails me courage now?
I'm oppressed with rage and grief,
For the deed that I have don
On his body sworded sore!"

Laeg: It becomes thee not to weep;
Fitter for thee to exult!
Yon red-speared one thee hath left
Plaintful, wounded, steeped in gore!"

Cuchulain: "Even had he cleaved my leg,
And one hand had severed too;
Woe, that Ferdiad-- who rode steeds--
Shall not ever be in life!"

Laeg: "Liefer far what's come to pass,
To the maidens of Red Branch;
He to die, thou to remain;
They grudge not that ye should part!"

Cuchulain: "From the day I Cualnge left,
Seeking high and splendid Medb,
Carnage has she had-- with fame--
Of her warriors whom I've slain!"

Laeg: "Thou hast had no sleep in peace,
In pursuit of thy great Tin;
Though thy troop was few and small,
Oft thou wouldst rise at early morn!"
Erig a rchu Emna,
cru a chach duit mormenma,
ra lis dt Fer n-diad na n-drong,
debrad is cruaid do chomlond.
Ga chana dam menma mr,
ram immart baeis acus brn
ithle inn echta doringnius
issin chuirp ra chruadchlaidbius.

Ni ra chir dait a chaniud,
coru dait a chommaidium,
rat rcaib in radrinnech
cintech crechtach crolindech.

Da m-benad mo lethchoiss slin
dm is cor benad mo lethlim,
trug nach Fer diad bi ar echaib
tri bithu na bithbethaid.

Ferr leo-som na n-dernad de
ra ingenaib Craebruade,
sessium d'c tussu dh'anad,
leo n bec bar m-bithscarad.

n l thanac a Cualnge
i n-diaid Medba mrglare,
is ar dain le co m-blaid
ra marbais da miledaib.

Ni ra chotlais issma
i n-degaid da mrthana,
giar b'uathed do dm malle,
mr maitne ba moch th'eirge.

Cuchulain began to lament and bemoan Ferdiad, and he spake the words:

"Alas, O Ferdiad," spake he, "'twas thine ill fortune thou didst not take counsel with any of those that knew my real deeds of valour and arms, before we met in clash of battle! Unhappy for thee that Laeg son of Riangabair did not make thee blush in regard to our comradeship! Unhappy for thee that the truly faithful warning of Fergus thou didst not take! Unhappy for thee that dear, trophied, triumphant, battle-victorious Conall counselled thee not in regard to our comradeship! For those men would not have spoken in obedience to the messages or desires or orders or false words of promise of the fair-haired women of Connacht. For well do those men know that there will not be born a being that will perform deeds so tremendous and so great among the Connachtmen as I, till the very day of doom and of everlasting life, whether at plying of spear and sword, at playing at draughts and chess, at driving of steeds and chariots."
Ra gab Cuchulaind ac cine & ac airchisecht Fir diad and & ra bert na briathra:

Maith, a Fir diad, b dursan dait nach nech dind fiallaig ra fitir mo chertgnmrada-sa gaile & gascid ra acallais re comriactain din comrac n-immairic. Ba dirsan dait nach Laeg mac Riangabra ramnastar comairle ar comaltais. Ba dirsan duit nch athesc frglan Fergusa foremais. Ba dirsan duit nach Conall caem coscarach commidmech cathbuadach cobrastar comairle ar comaltais. Dag ra fetatar in fir sin, na gigne gein gabas gnimrada cutrumma commra Connachtaig (?) rut-sa go brunni m-brtha & betha. Dag ni adiartis ind fir sein de fessaib na dlib na dlaib n briathraib brec-ingill ban cendfind Connacht. eter imbeirt scell & scath, eter imbeirt gae & chlaideb, eter imbeirt m-brandub & fidchell, eter imbeirt ech & charpat.

"There shall not be found the hand of a hero that will wound warrior's flesh, like cloud-coloured Ferdiad! There shall not be heard from the gap the cry of red-mouthed Badb to the winged, shade-speckled flocks! There shall not be one that will contend for Cruachan that will obtain covenants equal to thine, till the very day of doom and of life henceforward, O red-cheeked son of Daman!" said Cuchulain. Then it was that Cuchulain arose and stood over Ferdiad: "Ah, Ferdiad," spake Cuchulain, "greatly have the men of Erin deceived and abandoned thee, to bring thee to contend and do battle with me. For no easy thing is it to contend and do battle with me on the Raid for the Kine of Cualnge! Thus he spake, and he uttered these words:
N bha lam laich lethas crna caurad mar Fer n-diad n n-datha. N bha buriud berna baidbhi belderg do scoraib sciathcha scthbricci. Ni bha Cruachain cossenas, gebas curu cutrumma rut-su, go brunni m-bratha & bhetha badesta, a meic drechdeirg Damin, bar Cuchulaind. Is and-sin ra erig Cuchulaind as chind Fir diad. Maith a Fir diad, bar Cuchulaind, is mr in brth & in trecun dabertatar fir hErend fort do thabairt do chomlund & do chomruc rim-sa, dig ni rid comlund na comrac rim-sa bar tain bo Cualnhge. Is amlaid ra bi g rd & rabert na briathra:

"Ah, Ferdiad, betrayed to death.
Our last meeting, oh, how sad!
Thou to die I to remain.
Ever sad our long farewell!
"When we over yonder dwelt
With our Scathach, steadfast, true,
This we thought till end of time,
That our friendship ne'er would end!

"Dear to me thy noble blush;
Dear thy comely, perfect form;
Dear thine eye, blue-grey and clear;
Dear thy wisdom and thy speech!

"Never strode to rending fight,
Never wrath and manhood held,
Nor slung shield across broad back,
One like thee, Daman's red son!

Never have I met till now,
Since I Oenfer Aif slew,
One thy peer in deeds of arms,
Never have I found, Ferdiad!

Finnabair, Medb's daughter fair,
Beauteous, lovely though she be,
As a gad round sand or stones,
She was shown to thee, Ferdiad!"
A Fir diad ar dot chle brath,
dursan do dl dedenach,
tussu d'c missi d'anad,
sirdursan ar srscarad.
Mad dammamar alla anall
ac Scthaig Bhuadaig Bhuanand,
dar lind go bruthe bras
nocho biad ar n-athchardes.

Inmain lemm do ruidiud rn,
inmain do chruth caem comln,
inmain do rosc glass glanba (no gregda),
inmain t'laig (no t'lle) is t'irlabra.

Nr ching din tress tinbhi chness,
nir gab feirg ra ferachas,
ni ra chongaib scath as leirg lin
th'aidgin-siu a meic deirg Damain.

Ni tharla rumm sund cose,
a bhacear Oenfer Aife,
da mac samla galaib gliad,
ni fuarus sund a Fir diad.

Findabair ingea Medba,
g beith d'febas a delba,
is gat im ganem n im gran
a taidbsiu duit-siu a Fir diad.

Then Cuchulain turned to gaze on Ferdiad. "Ah, my master Laeg," cried Cuchulain, "now strip Ferdiad and take his armour and garments off him, that I may see the brooch for the sake of which he entered on the combat and fight with me." Laeg came up and stripped Ferdiad. He took his armour and garments off him and he saw the brooch and he began to lament and complain over Ferdiad, and he spake these words:
Ra gab Cuchulaind ac fegad Fir diad and. Maith a mo phopa Laig, bar Cuchulaind, fadbaig Fer n-diad bhadesta, & ben a erriud & a tgud de, go faccur-sa in delg ara n-derna in comlund & in comrac. Tanic Laeg & ra fadbaig Fer n-diad. Ra ben a erriud & a tgud de, & ra chonnaic in delg, & ra gab ga caine & ga airchisecht & ra bert na briathra:

"Alas, golden brooch;
Ferdiad of the hosts,
O good smiter, strong,
Victorious thy hand!
"Thy hair blond and curled,
A wealth fair and grand.
Thy soft, leaf-shaped belt
Around thee till death!

"Our comradeship dear;
Thy noble eye's gleam;
Thy golden-rimmed shield;
Thy sword, treasures worth!

"Thy white-silver torque
Thy noble arm binds.
Thy chess-board worth wealth;
Thy fair, ruddy cheek!

"To fall by my hand,
I own was not just!
'Twas no noble fight.
Alas, golden brooch!
Dursan a eo oir,
a Fir diad aam (?),
a bailcbemnig chain,
b buadach do lam.
Do barr buide chas,
ba bras ba cain set,
do cris duillech maeth,
no bith imod thoeb.

Ar comaltus coem,
a airer nasul [sic],
do sciath co m-bil oir,
do cloidem ba coem.

T'ornasc arcait bain
immo do laim soir,
t'fhithchell ba fiu moir [sic],
do gruadh corcra choin.

Do thuittim dom lim,
tucim narb chir,
nir bha chomsund chin,
dursan a e ir.

"Come, O Laeg my master," cried Cuchulain; "now cut open Ferdiad and take the Gae Bulga out, because I may not be without my weapons." Laeg came and cut open Ferdiad and he took the Gae Bulga out of him. And Cuchulain saw his weapons bloody and red-stained by the side of Ferdiad, and he uttered these words:--
Maith a mo phopa Lag, bar Cuchulaind, coscair Fer n-diad fadesta & ben in n-gae m-bolga ass, dag ni fetaim-se beith i n-cmais m'airm. Tanic Laeg, & ra choscair Fer n-diad acus ra ben in n-gae m-bolga ass. Acus ra chonnaic-sium a arm fuilech forderg ra taeb Fir diad & ra bert na briathra:

"O Ferdiad, in gloom we meet.
Thee I see both red and pale.
I myself with unwashed arms;
Thou liest in thy bed of gore!
"Were we yonder in the East,
Scathach and our Uathach near,
There would not be pallid lips
Twixt us two, and arms of strife!

"Thus spake Scathach trenchantly (?),
Words of warning, strong and stern.
'Go ye all to furious fight;
German, blue-eyed, fierce will come!'

"Unto Ferdiad then I spake,
And to Lugaid generous,
To the son of fair Baetan,
German we would go to meet!

"We came to the battle-rock,
Over Lake Linn Formait's shore.
And four hundred men we brought
From the Isles of the Athissech!

"As I stood and Ferdiad brave
At the gate of German's fort,
I slew Rinn the son of Nel;
He slew Ruad son of Fornel!

Ferdiad slew upon the slope
Blath, of Colba 'Red-sword' son.
Lugaid, fierce and swift, then slew
Mugairne of the Tyrrhene Sea!

"I slew, after going in,
Four times fifty grim, wild men.
Ferdiad killed-- a furious horde--
Dam Dremenn and Dam Dilenn!

"We laid waste shrewd German's fort
O'er the broad, bespangled sea.
German we brought home alive
To our Scathach of broad shield!

"Then our famous nurse made fast
Our blood-pact of amity,
That our angers should not rise
'Mongst the tribes of noble Elg!

"Sad the morn, a day in March,
Which struck down weak Daman's son.
Woe is me, the friend is fall'n
Whom I pledged in red blood's draught!

"Were it there I saw thy death,
Midst the great Greeks' warrior-bands,
I'd not live on after thee,
But together we would die!

"Woe, what us befel therefrom,
Us, dear Scathach's fosterlings,
Me sore wounded, red with blood,
Thee no more to drive thy car!

"Woe, what us befel therefrom,
Us, dear Scathach's fosterlings,
Me sore wounded, stiff with gore,
Thee to die the death for aye!

"Woe, what us befel therefrom,
Us, dear Scathach's fosterlings,
Thee in death, me, strong, alive.
Valour is an angry strife!"
A Fir diad is truag in dl,
t'acsin dam go ruad robn,
missi gan m'arm do nigi,
tussu it chossair chroligi.
Md dammamar all anair
ac Scathaig is ac Uathaig,
nocho betis beil bna
etraind is airm ilga.

Atubairt Scthach go scenb
a athesc ruanaid roderb:
Ergid uli don chath chass,
bar-ficfa German Garbglass.

Atubart-sa ra Fer n-diad
acus ra Lugaid lnfal
acus ra mac m-Baetain m-bin
techt dn i n-agid Germa(i)n.

Lodmar go haille in chomraic
s leirg Locha Lind Formait,
tucsam chethri cht immach
a indsib na n-athissech.

Da m-ba-sa is Fer diad inn ig
i n-dorus dne Germain,
ro marbusa Rind mae Nuil,
ro marb-som Ruad mac Fornuil.

Ra marb Fer baeth ar in leirg
Blth mac Colbai chlaidebdeirg,
ro marb Lugaid fer duairc dan
Mugairne mara Torrian.

Ra marbusa ar n-dula innund
cethri choicait frn ferglond,
ro marb Fer diad, duairc in drem,
Dam n-dreimed is Dam n-dilend.

Ra airgsem dn n-Germin n-glicc
s fargi lethan lindbricc,
tucsam Germn i m-bethaid
lind go Scthaig sciathlethain.

Da naisc ar mummi go m-blad
ar cr cotaig is entad,
conna betis ar ferga
eter fini find-Elga.

Trug in maten maten mirt,
ros b mac Damin dithraicht,
uchan dochara in cara
dara dalius dig n-dergfala.

Da m-bad and atcheind-sea th'c
eter miledaib mr-Grc,
n beind-se i m-bethaid dar th'eis,
go m-bad aroen atbhilmeis.

Is trag an narta de
nar n-daltanaib Scathche,
missi crechtach bha chru rad,
tussu gan charptiu d'imlud.

Is trag an narta de
nar n-daltanaib Scthaiche,
missi crechtach bha chr garb
acus tussu ulimarb.

Is truag an narta de
nar n-daltanaib Scathaige,
tussu dh'c, missi be brass,
is gleo ferge in ferachas.

"Good, O Cucuc," spake Laeg, "let us leave this ford now; too long are we here!" "Aye, let us leave it, O my master Laeg," replied Cuchulain. "But every combat and battle I have fought seems a game and a sport to me compared with the combat and battle of Ferdiad." Thus he spake, and he uttered these words:
Maith a Chucuc, bar Laeg, fcbam in n-th sa fadesta. Is rofata atm and. Faicfimmt m cin, a mo phopa Lig, bar Cuchulaind. Acht is cluchi & is gini lem-sa cach comlond & cach comrac darnus i farrad chomlaind & comraic Fir diad. Acus is amlaid ra bi ga rd & rabert na briathra:

All was play, all was sport,
Till came Ferdiad to the ford!
One task for both of us,
Equal our reward.
Our kind, gentle nurse
Chose him over all!
All was play, all was sport,
Till came Ferdiad to the ford!
One our life, one our fear,
One our skill in arms.
Shields gave Scathach twain
To Ferdiad and me!

All was play, all was sport,
Till came Ferdiad to the ford!
Dear the shaft of gold
I smote on the ford.
Bull-chief of the tribes,
Braver he than all!

Only games and only sport,
Till came Ferdiad to the ford!
Lion furious, flaming, fierce;
Swollen wave that wrecks like doom!

Only games and only sport,
Till came Ferdiad to the ford!
Loved Ferdiad seemed to me
After me would live for aye!
Yesterday, a mountain's size--
He is but a shade to-day!

Three things countless on the Tin
Which have fallen by my hand:
Hosts of cattle, men and steeds
I have slaughtered on all sides!

Though the hosts were e'er so great,
That came out of Cruachan wild,
More than third and less than half,
Slew I in my direful sport!

Never trod in battle's ring;
Banba nursed not on her breast;
Never sprang from sea or land,
King's son that had larger fame!"
Cluchi cach gine cach
go roich Fer[n]diad issin n-th.
Inund foglaim frth dinn,
innund rograim rth,
inund mummi maeth,
ras slainni sech cch.
Cluchi cach gaine cach
go roich Fer diad issin n-ath.
Inund aisti aruth dinn,
inund gasced gnath.
Scathach tuc da sciath
dam-sa is Fer diad trth.

Cluchi cach gaine cach
go roich Fer diad issin n-th.
Inmain uatni ir
ra furmius ar th,
a tarbga na tuath
ba calma na cch.

Cluchi cach gaine cach
go roich Fer diad issin n-th,
in leoman lassamain lond,
in tond baeth bhorr immar brath.

Cluchi cach gaine cach
go roich Fer diad issin n-th.
Indar lim-sa Fer dil diad
is am diaid ra biad go brath.
Ind ba metithir sliab,
indiu n fuil de acht a scath.

Tri drme na tana
darochratar dom lama,
formna b fer acus ech,
ro-da-slaidius ar cach leth.
20. The Combat of Ferdiad and Cuchulain Comrac Fir dead inso.
Then the men of Erin took counsel who would be fit to send to the ford to fight and do battle with Cuchulain, to drive him off from them at the morning hour early on the morrow. With one accord they declared that it should be Ferdiad son of Daman son of Dar, the great and valiant warrior of the men of Dornnann. And fitting it was for him to go thither, for well-matched and alike was their manner of fight and of combat. Under the same instructresses had they done skillful deeds of valour and arms, when learning the art with Scathach ('the Modest') and with Uathach ('the Dreadful') and with Aif ('the Handsome'). And neither of them overmatched the other, save in the feat of the Gae Bulga ('the Barbed Spear') which Cuchulain possessed. Howbeit, against this, Ferdiad was horn-skinned when fighting and in combat with a warrior on the ford.
Is and-sin ra imraided oc feraib hErend cia bad chir do chomlond & do chomrac ra Coinculaind ra hair na maitni muchi arna brach. Issed ra raidsetar uile co m-bad Fer diad mac Damain meic Dre, in mlid mrchalma d'feraib Domnand. Daig bha cosmail & bha comadas a comlond & a comrac. Ac oenmummib daronsat ceirdgnimrada gaile & gascid dar a foglaim, ac Scthaig & ac Uathaig & ac ife. Ocus n bi immarcraid neich db ac raile, acht cless in gae bulga ac Coinculaind. Cid ed n ba conganchnessach Fer diad ac comlund & ac comrac ra lech ar th na agid-side.

Then were messengers and envoys sent to Ferdiad. Ferdiad denied them their will, and sent back the messengers, and he went not with them, for he knew wherefore they would have him, to fight and combat with his friend, with his comrade and foster-brother, Cuchulain. Then did Medb despatch the druids and the poets of the camp, the lampoonists and hard-attackers, for Ferdiad, to the end that they might make three satires to stay him and three scoffing speeches against him, that they might raise three blisters on his face, Blame, Blemish and Disgrace, if he came not with them.
Is and-sin ra fittea fessa & techtaireda ar cend Fir diad. Ra rastar & ra eittchestar & ra repestar Fer diad na techta sin, ocus n thnic leo, dig ra fitir an ma-ra-batar d, do chomlond & do chomrac re charait, re chocle & re chomalta, [re Fer n-diad mac n-Damin meic Dre, & n thanic leo]. Is and-sin fitte Medb na drith & na glmma & na cradgressa ar cend Fir diad, ar con derntis tor(a) ara fossaigthe d, & teora glamma dcend, go tcbaits teora bolga bar a agid, ail & anim & athis [mur bud marb a chetir co m-bad marb re cind nomaide], munu thsed.

Ferdiad came with them for the sake of his own honour, forasmuch as he deemed it better to fall by the shafts of valour and bravery and skill, than to fall by the shafts of satire, abuse and reproach. And when Ferdiad was come into the camp, he was honoured and waited on, and choice, well-flavoured strong liquor was poured out for him till he became drunken and merry. Great rewards were promised him if he would make the fight and combat, namely a chariot worth four times seven bondmaids, and the apparel of two men and ten men, of cloth of every colour, and the equivalent of the Plain of Murthemne of the rich Plain of Ai, free of tribute, without duress for his son, or for his grandson, or for his great-grandson, till the end of time and existence.
Tanic Fer diad leo dar cend a enig, daig ba hussu lessium a thuttim do gaib gaile & gascid & engnama n a thuttim de gaaib ire & cnaig & imdergtha. Ocus a daracht, ra fadaiged & ra frithled , ocus ra dled lind sola sochin somesc fair, gor bo mesc medarchin , & ra gelta comada mra d ar in comlond & ar in comrac do denam, i. carpat cethri secht cumal & timthacht da fer dc d'etgud cacha datha, & commit a feraind de mn maige hi, gan chin, (gan chobach, gan dunad, gan sluagad) gan ecendil da mac & d ua & da iarmua go brunni m-brtha & betha, & Findabair d'enmni, & in t-o ir bae i m-brutt Medba fair anas.

Such were the words of Medb, and she spake them here and Ferdiad responded:

Medb: "Great rewards in arm-rings,
Share of plain and forest
Freedom of thy children
From this day till doom!
Ferdiad son of Daman,
More than thou couldst hope for,
Why shouldst thou refuse it,
That which all would take?"
Ferdiad: "Naught I'll take without bond--
No ill spearman am I--
Hard on me to-morrow:
Great will be the strife!
Hound that's hight of Culann,
How his thrust is grievous!
No soft thing to stand him;
Rude will be the wound!"

Medb: "Champions will be surety,
Thou needst not keep hostings.
Reins and splendid horses
Shall be given as pledge!
Ferdiad, good, of battle,
For that thou art dauntless,
Thou shalt be my lover,
Past all, free of cain !"

Ferdiad: "Without bond I'll go not
To engage in ford-feats;
It will live till doomsday
In full strength and force.
Ne'er I'll yield-- who hears me,
Whoe'er counts upon me--
Without sun- and moon-oath,
Without sea and land!"

Medb: "Why then dost delay it?
Bind it as it please thee,
By kings' hands and princes',
Who will stand for thee!
Lo, I will repay thee,
Thou shalt have thine asking,
For I know thou'lt slaughter
Man that meeteth thee!"

Ferdiad: "Nay, without six sureties--
It shall not be fewer--
Ere I do my exploits
There where hosts will be!
Should my will be granted,
I swear, though unequal,
That I'll meet in combat
Cuchulain the brave!"

Medb: "Domnall, then, or Carbr,
Niaman famed for slaughter,
Or e'en folk of barddom,
Natheless, thou shalt have.
Bind thyself on Morann,
Wouldst thou its fulfilment
Bind on smooth Man's Carbr,
And our two sons, bind!"

Ferdiad: "Medb, with wealth of cunning,
Whom no spouse can bridle,
Thou it is that herdest
Cruachan of the mounds!
High thy fame and wild power!
Mine the fine pied satin;
Give thy gold and silver,
Which were proffered me!"

Medb: "To thee, foremost champion,
I will give my ringed brooch.
From this day till Sunday,
Shall thy respite be!
Warrior, mighty, famous,
All the earth's fair treasures
Shall to thee be given;
Everything be thine!

"Finnabair of the champions (?),
Queen of western Erin,
When thou'st slain the Smith's Hound,
Ferdiad, she's thine!"
Is amlaid ra bi Medb g rada, & ra bert na briathra and & ra recair Fer diad:

M.Rat fia lach mr m-buinne
ra[t] chuit maige is chaille,
ra sire do chlainne
andiu co t brth.
A Fir diad meic Damin [eirggi guin is gabail]
attetha as cech anil.
Cid dait gan a gabil
an gabas cch.
F. d. Ni gb-sa gan rach,
dig nim lech gan lmach,
bhud tromm form imbrach
bud fortrn in feidm.
C dn comainm Culand,
is amnas inn urrand,
n furusa a fulang,
bud tairpech in teidm.

M. Rat fat lich rat lma,
no co raga ar dla,
srin ocus eich na
ra bhertar rit lim.
A Fir-diad inn ga,
dig isat duni dna,
dam-sa bat fer grda,
sech cch gan nach cin.

F. d. Ni rag-sa gan rtha
do chluchi na n-tha,
meraid coll m-brtha,
go bruth is co m-brg.
Noco gb, ge sti,
ge ra beth dom resci,
gan grin ocus sci
la muir ocus tr.

M.Ga chan duit a fuirech
naisc-siu, gor bat bidech,
for deiss rig is ruirech,
doragat rat lim.
Fuil sund nachat tuilfea,
rat fa cach n chungfea,
dig ra fess co mairbfea
in fer thic it dil.

F. d. Ni gb gan s curu,
n ba n bas lugu,
sul donor mo mudu
i m-bail i m-biat sluig.
Danam thorrsed m'ardarc
cinnfet, cun cup comnart,
co n-dernur in comrac
ra Coinculaind craid.

M. Cid Domnall na Charpre
na Namn n airgne
gid at lucht na bairddne,
rot fat-su gid acht.
Fonasc latt ar Morand,
mad aill latt a chomall,
naisc Carpre mn Manand
is naisc ar da macc.

F. d. A Medb co mt m-buafaid,
nt chredb cine nuachair,
is derb is t is buachail
ar Cruachain na clad.
Ard glr is art gargnert,
dom-roiched srl santbrecc,
tuc dam th'r is t'arget,
daig ro fairgged dam.

M. Nach tussu in caur codnach
da tiber delgg n-drolmach
ndiu cot domnach,
ni ba dl bha sa.
A laich blatnig bhladmair,
cach st cem ar talmain
dabrthar duit amlaid,
is uili rot fia.

Finnabair na fergga
rgan iarthair Elgga
ar n-dth chon na cerdda
a Fir diad rot fia.

Then said they, one and all, those gifts were great. "'Tis true, they are great. But though they are," said Ferdiad, "with Medb herself I will leave them, and I will not accept them if it be to do battle or combat with my foster-brother, the man of my alliance and affection, and my equal in skill of arms, namely, with Cuchulain." And he said:
Is ann sin ro raidhsit cch uile i coitcinne gur mor na comadha sin. Cidh mor immorro, ar Fer diad, is ac Meidhbh fen beit uaim-si agus n ba hagam-sa doip ar comrac no ar comhlonn do ghenamh rem chombalta & rem fear cadaigh agus cumainn .i. Cuchulainn. Agus itbert:

"Greatest toil, this, greatest toil,
Battle with the Hound of gore!
Liefer would I battle twice
With two hundred men of Fal!
"Sad the fight, and sad the fight,
I and Hound of feats shall wage!
We shall hack both flesh and blood;
Skin and body we shall hew!

"Sad, O god, yea, sad, O god,
That a woman should us part!
My heart's half, the blameless Hound;
Half the brave Hound's heart am I!

"By my shield, O by my shield,
If Ath Cliath's brave Hound should fall,
I will drive my slender glaive
Through my heart, my side, my breast!

"By my sword, O by my sword,
If the Hound of Glen Bolg fall!
No man after him I'll slay,
Till I o'er the world's brink spring!

"By my hand, O, by my hand!
Falls the Hound of Glen in Sgail,
Medb with all her host I'll kill
And then no more men of Fal!

"By my spear, O, by my spear!
Should Ath Cro's brave Hound be slain,
I'll be buried in his grave;
May one grave hide me and him!

"Tell him this, O tell him this,
To the Hound of beauteous hue
Fearless Scathach hath foretold
My fall on a ford through him!

"Woe to Medb, yea, woe to Medb,
Who hath used her guile on us;
She hath set me face to face
'Gainst Cuchulain-- hard the toil!"
Feidbm as mo
comrac re Coinculainn cr,
trag nach da cet d'feraib Fail
dus-ficfedh im dail fa dh.
Truagh an tres
beras m as C na ccleas,
tescfamit feoil agus fuil,
gearrfamait corp agus cnes.

Truag a Dh
teacht do mhnaoi eadrom as ,
leth mo croidhi in C cen col,
agus leth croidhi na Con m.

Dar mo sgiath,
da marbhar C Atha cliath,
saithfidh m mo cloidebh caol
trem croidhi trem taobh trem chliabh.

Dar mo colg,
da marbhar C Glinne bolg,
ni mnirbhf(eat) duine dh s,
nocha d-tiobar lem tar bor(d).

Dar mo laim,
da marbhar C Glinne in sgail,
muirbhf(idh) m Meidhbh cona sluagh
agus ns mo d'fearaibh Fail.

Dar mo g,
da marbhar C Atha cr,
adlaicthear misi ina fert,
bidh ionann leact damh is d.

Abair ris,
risin cCoin go ccaimhi cnis,
gur tairngir Sgthach gan sgth,
misi ar th do tuitim ris.

Mairg do Meidb,
ro imbir oruinn a delm,
misi do cur cenn i ccenn
as Cuchulainn as tenn feidm.

"Ye men," spake Medb, in the wonted fashion of stirring up disunion and dissension, "true is the word Cuchulain speaks." "What word is that?" asked Ferdiad. "He said, then," replied Medb, "he would not think it too much if thou shouldst fall by his hands in the choicest feat of his skill in arms, in the land whereto he should come." "It was not just for him to speak so," quoth Ferdiad; "for it is not cowardice or lack of boldness that he hath ever seen in me. And I swear by my arms of valour, if it be true that he spoke so, I will be the first man of the men of Erin to contend with him on the morrow!" "A blessing and victory upon thee for that!" said Medb; "it pleaseth me more than for thee to show fear and lack of boldness. For every man loves his own land, and how is it better for him to seek the welfare of Ulster, than for thee to seek the welfare of Connacht?"
A fiora, ar Medbh tre cir n-iondlaigh & n-iomchosaidi, as for in briathar itbert Cc. Crt an briathar sin, ar Fer diad. Adubairt immorro, ar Medhbh, na badh furil les do tuitim-si les in airigidh gaisgidh isin tir a racadh. Nior coir do-som sin do radha, ar Fer diad, uair n h mo metacht-so n mo milaochdacht ro fitir-siom form-sa riamh. Agus luighim-si fm armaibh, mas fior a rdha sin d-somh, comadh misi cetfear comhraicfes fris amrach d'feraib Erenn. Bendacht fort-sa d cionn sin, ar Medhbh, ferr liom-sa sin ina time agus milaochas do dhenamh duit, uair as badhach nech im tir fn agus cia cora dosan sochar Uladh do dhnamh ina duit-si sochar Connacht.

Then it was that Medb obtained from Ferdiad the easy surety of a covenant to fight and contend on the morrow with six warriors of the champions of Erin, or to fight and contend with Cuchulain alone, if to him this last seemed lighter. Ferdiad obtained of Medb the easy surety, as he thought, to send the aforesaid six men for the fulfilment of the terms which had been promised him, should Cuchulain fall at his hands.
Is andsain ra siacht Medb math n-raig bar Fer n-diad im chomlond & im chomrac ra sessiur curad arna brach, n im chomlond & im chomrac ra Coinculaind a oenur, da m-bad assu leiss. Ra siacht Fer diad math n-araig furrisi [no andar leis] im chur in t-sessir chtna im na comadaib ra gellad do do chomallud riss, mad da toetsad Cuchulaind leiss.

Then were Fergus' horses fetched for him and his chariot was yoked, and he came forward to the place of combat where Cuchulain was, to inform him of the challenge. Cuchulain bade him welcome. "Welcome is thy coming, O my master Fergus!" cried Cuchulain. "Truly intended, methinks, the welcome, O fosterling," said Fergus. "But, it is for this I am here, to inform thee who comes to fight and contend with thee at the morning hour early on the morrow." "E'en so will we hear it from thee," said Cuchulain. "Thine own friend and comrade and foster-brother, the man thine equal in feats and in skill of arms and in deeds, Ferdiad son of Daman son of Dar, the great and mighty warrior of the men of Domnann."
Andsain ra gabait a eich d'Fergus & ra hindled a charpat, ocus tnic reme co airm (a m-boi Cuchulainn da innisin) do sain. Firiss Cuchulaind falti riss. Mochen do thchtu a mo phopa Ferguis, bar Cuchulaind. Tarissi lim inn inn flti a daltin, bar Fergus. Acht is do ra dechad-sa, da innisin duit int ro that do chomlond & do chomruc rutt ra hair na maitne muche imbrach. Clunemni latt didiu, bar Cuchulaind. Do chara fin & do chocle & do chomalta, th'fer comchliss & comgascid & comgnma, Fer diad mac Damain meic Dre, in milid mrchalma d'feraib Domnand.

"As my soul liveth," replied Cuchulain, "it is not to an encounter we wish our friend to come." "It is even for that," answered Fergus, "thou shouldst be on thy guard and prepared. For unlike all to whom it fell to fight and contend with thee on the Cualnge Cattle-raid on this occasion is Ferdiad son of Daman son of Dar." "Truly am I here," said Cuchulain, "checking and staying four of the five grand provinces of Erin from Monday at Summer's end till the beginning of spring. And in all this time, I have not put foot in retreat before any one man nor before a multitude, and methinks just as little will I turn foot in flight before him."
Attear ar cobais, bar Cuchulaind, n na dil duthracmar ar cara do thuidecht. Is aire sein iarum ale, bar Fergus, ara n-airichlea & ara n-airelma, dig n mar chach conarnecar comlund & comrac riut for tain b Cualnge don chur sa, Fer diad mac Damain meic Dare. Attsa sund m, bar Cuchulaind, ac fostud & ac imfurech cethri n-ollchoiced n-hErend o lan taite samna co tate imbuilg, acus ni rucus traig techid re n-oenfer risin re sin, & is dig lim ni m brat remi-sium.

So spake Fergus, putting him on his guard, and he said these words and Cuchulain responded:

Fergus: "O Cuchulain-- splendid deed--
Lo, 'tis time for thee to rise.
Here in rage against thee comes
Ferdiad, red-faced Daman's son!"
Cuchulain: "Here am I-- no easy task--
Holding Erin's men at bay;
Foot I've never turned in flight
In my fight with single foe!"

Fergus: "Dour the man when anger moves,
Owing to his gore-red glaive;
Ferdiad wears a skin of horn,
'Gainst which fight nor might prevails!"

Cuchulain: "Be thou still urge not thy tale,
Fergus of the mighty arms.
On no land and on no ground,
For me is there aught defeat!"

Fergus: "Fierce the man with scores of deeds;
No light thing, him to subdue.
Strong as hundreds-- brave his mien--
Point pricks not, edge cuts him not!"

Cuchulain: "If we clash upon the ford,
I and Ferdiad of known skill,
We'll not part without we know:
Fierce will be our weapon fight!"

Fergus: "More I'd wish it than reward,
O Cuchulain of red sword,
Thou shouldst be the one to bring
Eastward haughty Ferdiad's spoils!"

Cuchulain: "Now I give my word and vow,
Though unskilled in strife of words,
It is I will conquer this
Son of Daman macDar!"

Fergus: It is I brought east the host,
Thus requiting Ulster's wrong.
With me came they from their lands,
With their heroes and their chiefs!"

Cuchulain: "Were not Conchobar in the 'Pains,'
Hard 'twould be to come near us.
Never Medb of Mag in Scail
On more tearful march had come!"

Fergus: "Greatest deed awaits thy hand:
Fight with Ferdiad, Daman's son.
Hard stern arms with stubborn edge,
Shalt thou have, thou Culann's Hound!"
Acus iss amlaid ra bai Fergus ga rd ga baglugud & rabert na briathra & ra recair Cuchulaind:

F.: A Chuculaind, comal n-gle,
atchiu is mithig duit irge,
at sund chucut ra feirg
Fer diad mac Damin drechdeirg.
Cc.: At-sa sund, ni sel saeng,
ac trenastud fer n-hErend,
n rucus for teched traig
ar apa chomlond oenfir.

F.: Amnas in fer dalae feirg
as luss a chlaidib crdeirg,
cnes congna im Fer n-diad na n-drong,
ris n geib cath na comlond.

Cc.: B tost, na tacair do scl,
a Ferguis na n-arm n-imthrn,
dar cach ferand dar cach fond
dam-sa nochon ecomlond.

F.: Amnas in fer fichtib gal,
nochon furusa a threthad,
nert ct na churp, calma in mod,
nin geib rind nin tesc faebor.

Cc.: Mad dia comairsem bar th,
missi is Fer diad gascid ghnth,
ni ba in scarad gan sceo,
bud ferggach ar faebargleo.

F.: Ra pad ferr lem anda lag,
a Chuchulaind chlaidebrad,
co m-bad tu ra berad sair
coscur Fir diad diummasaig.

Cc.: Atiur-sa brethir co m-big,
gon com maith-se oc immarbig,
is missi bnadaigfes de
bar mac n-Damain meic Dre.

F.: Is me targlaim na sluagu sair,
lag mo saraigthe d'Ultaib,
lim thancatar tirib
a curaid a cathmilid.

Cc.: Mun bud Chonchobar na chess,
r pad chraid in comadchess,
ni thnic Medb Maige in Scil
turus bad m con-gir.

F.: Ra fail gnm is m bard lim,
gleo ra Fer n-diad mac Damain,
arm craid catut cardda raind
bid acut a Chuculaind.

After that, Fergus returned to the camp and halting-place. As for Ferdiad, he betook himself to his tent and to his people, and imparted to them the easy surety which Medb had obtained from him to do combat and battle with six warriors on the morrow, or to do combat and battle with Cuchulain alone, if he thought it a lighter task. He made known to them also the fair terms he had obtained from Medb of sending the same six warriors for the fulfilment of the covenant she had made with him, should Cuchulain fall by his hands. The folk of Ferdiad were not joyful, blithe, cheerful or merry that night, but they were sad, sorrowful and downcast, for they knew that where the two champions and the two bulwarks in a gap for a hundred met in combat, one or other of them would fall there or both would fall, and if it should be one of them, they believed it would be their king and their own lord that would fall there, for it was not easy to contend and do battle with Cuchulain on the Raid for the Kine of Cualnge.
Tanic Fergus reme dochum n-dunaid & longphuirt. Luid Fer diad dochum a pupla & a muntiri, acus rachaid dib math n-raig do tharrachtain do Meidb fair im chomlond & im chomrac ra sessiur curad arna barach, n im chomlund & im chomrac ra Coinculaind a oenur, dia m-bad assu leiss. Dachuaid dib no meth n-raig do tharrachtain do- som for Meidb im chuir in t-seisir churad chetna im na comadaib ra gellad do do chomallad riss, mad da tatsad Cuchulaind leiss. Nirdar subaig smaig sobb ronaig somenmnaig lucht puible Fir diad inn aidchi sin), acht rapsat dubaig dobbrnaig domenmnaig, dig ra fetatar airm condricfaitis na da curaid & na da chliathbernaid chet co taetsad cechtar db and n co taetsatis a n-ds, acus dam nechtar db, dig lo-som go m-bad a tigerna fin, dig ni ba reid comlond na comrac ra Coinculaind for tain bo Cualnge.

Ferdiad slept right heavily the first part of the night, but when the end of the night was come, his sleep and his heaviness left him. And the anxiousness of the combat and the battle came upon him. And he charged his charioteer to take his horses and to yoke his chariot. The charioteer sought to dissuade him from that journey. "By our word," said the gilla, "'twould be better for thee to remain than to go thither," said he. And in this manner he spake, and he uttered these words, and the henchman responded:
Ra chotail Fer diad tossach na haidchi co rothromm, acus thanic deired na haidchi ra chaid a chotlud ad & ra luid a mesci de. Acus da bi ceist in chomlaind & in chomraic fair, acus ra gab lim ar a araid ara n-gabad a eocho & ara n-indled a charpat. Ra gab in t-ara ga imthairmesc imme. Ra pad ferr dib, ar se, ingilla. Bi tost dn, a gillai, ar Fer diad. Acus issamlaid ra bi ga rd & rabert na briathra and & ra frecair in gilla.

Ferdiad: "Let's haste to th' encounter,
To battle with this man;
The ford we will come to,
O'er which Badb will shriek!
To meet with Cuchulain,
To wound his slight body,
To thrust the spear through him
So that he may die!"
The Henchman: "To stay it were better;
Your threats are not gentle
Death's sickness will one have,
And sad will ye part!
To meet Ulster's noblest
To meet whence ill cometh;
Long will men speak of it.
Alas, for your course!"

Ferdiad: "Not fair what thou speakest;
No fear hath the warrior;
We owe no one meekness;
We stay not for thee!
Hush, gilla, about us!
The time will bring strong hearts;
More meet strength than weakness;
Let's on to the tryst!"
Tiagam issin dail-sea
do chosnam ind fir-sea,
gorrsem in n-th-sa,
th fors n-gera in badb,
i comdil Conculaind
da guin tre chreitt cumainhg,
gorruca thrt urraind,
corop de bus marb.
Ra pad ferr dib anad,
n ba mn far magar,
biaid nech dia m-ba galar,
bar scarad bud snid.
Techt in-dil ailt Ulad
is dl dia m-bia pudar,
is fata bas chuman,
mairg ragas in rim.

Ni cir ana rdi,
ni hopair niad nre,
ni dlegar dn ale,
ni anfam fad dig.
Bi tost dn a gillai,
bid calma r sst sinni,
ferr teinni na timmi,
(tiagam isin dil.)

Ferdiad's horses were now brought forth and his chariot was hitched, and he set out from the camp for the ford of battle when yet day with its full light had not come there for him. "Come, gilla," said Ferdiad, "spread for me the cushions and skins of my chariot under me here, so that I sleep off my heavy fit of sleep and slumber here, for I slept not the last part of the night with the anxiousness of the battle and combat." The gilla unharnessed the horses; he unfastened the chariot under him. He slept off the heavy fit of sleep that was on him.
Ra gabait a eich Fir diad & ra indled a charpat acus tanic reme co th in chomraic, acus ni thnic l cona lnsoilsi d and itir. Maith a gillai, bar Fer diad, scar dam fortcha & forgemen mo charpait fm and-so coro tholiur mo thromthairthim sain & chotulta and-so, dig ni ra chotlus deired na haidchi ra ceist in chomlaind & in chomraic. Ra scoir in gilla na eich, ra discuir in carpat fe. Toilis a thromthairthim cotulta fair.

Now how Cuchulain fared is related here: He arose not till the day with its bright light had come to him, lest the men of Erin might say it was fear or fright of the champion he had, if he should arise early. And when day with its full light had come, he passed his hand over his face and bade his charioteer take his horses and yoke them to his chariot. "Come, gilla," said Cuchulain, "take out our horses for us and harness our chariot, for an early riser is the warrior appointed to meet us, Ferdiad son of Daman son of Dar. "The horses are taken out," said the gilla; "the chariot is harnessed. Mount, and be it no shame to thy valour to go thither!"
Imthusa Conculaind sunda innossa. Ni erracht side itir, co tnic laa cona lnsoilse d, dig na hapraitis fir hErend is ecla no is uamun dobrad fair, mad da n-eirged. Acus thanic laa cona lansolsi, ra gab lim ar araid, ara n-gabad a eocho & ara n-indled a charpat. Maith a gillai, bar Cuchulaind, geib ar n-eich dn & innill ar carpat, dig is mochergech in laech ra dil nar n-dil, Fer diad mac Damain meic Dare. Is gabtha na eich, iss innilti in carpat. Cind-siu and, & ni tr dot gasciud.

Then it was that the cutting, feat-performing, battle-winning, red-sworded hero, Cuchulain son of Sualtaim, mounted his chariot, so that there shrieked around him the goblins and fiends and the sprites of the glens and the demons of the air; for the Tuatha De Danann ('the Folk of the Goddess Danu') were wont to set up their cries around him, to the end that the dread and the fear and the fright and the terror of him might be so much the greater in every battle and on every field, in every fight and in every combat wherein he went.
Is and-sin cinnis in cur cetach clessamnach cathbuadach claidebderg, Cuchulaind mac Sualtaim, ina charpat, gu ra gairsetar imme boccanaig & bnanaig & geniti glinne & demna aeir, daig dabertis Tuatha De Danand a n-gariud immi-sium, co m-bad mti a grin & a ecla & a urad & a uruamain in cach cath & in cach cathri, in cach comlund & in cach comruc i teiged.

Not long had Ferdiad's charioteer waited when he heard something: A rush and a crash and a hurtling sound, and a din and a thunder, and a clatter and a clash, namely, the shield-cry of feat-shields, and the jangle of javelins, and the deed-striking of swords, and the thud of the helmet, and the ring of spears, and the striking of arms, the fury of feats, the straining of ropes, and the whirr of wheels, and the creaking of the chariot, and the trampling of horses' hoofs, and the deep voice of the hero and battle-warrior on his way to the ford to attack his opponent. The servant came and touched his master with his hand. "Ferdiad, master," said the youth, "rise up! They are here to meet thee at the ford." And the gilla spake these words:
Nir bo chian d'araid Fir diad, co cuala inn: (in fuaim & an fothram agus in fidren & in toirm & in torann &) in sestanib & in ssilbi, .i. sceldgur na scath cliss & slicrech na sleg & glondbimnech na claideb & bressimnech in chathbarr & drongar na lurigi & imchommilt na n-arm, dechraidecht na cless, teteinmnech na tt, & nuallgrith na roth & culgaire in charpait & basschaire na n-ech & trommchoblach in churad & in chathmiled dochum inn tha d saigid. Tanic in gilla & forromair a lim for a thigerna. Maith a Fir diad, bar in gilla, comerig & atthar sund chucut dochum inn atha. Acus rabert in gilla na briathra and:

"The roll of a chariot,
Its fair yoke of silver;
A man great and stalwart
O'ertops the strong car!
O'er Bri Ross, o'er Bran
Their swift path they hasten;
Past Old-tree Town's tree-stump,
Victorious they speed!
"A sly Hound that driveth,
A fair chief that urgeth,
A free hawk that speedeth
His steeds towards the south!
Gore-coloured, the Cua,
'Tis sure he will take us
We know-- vain to hide it--
He brings us defeat!

Woe him on the hillock,
The brave Hound before him;
Last year I foretold it,
That some time he'd come!
Hound from Emain Macha,
Hound formed of all colours,
The Border-hound War-hound,
I hear what I've heard!"
Atchlunim cul carpait
ra cuing n-alaind n-argait,
is fuath fir co forbairt
as droich carpait chruaid.
Dar Breg Ross dar Braine
fochengat in slige,
sech bun Baile in bile,
is buadach a m-baid.
Is c airgdech aiges,
is carptech glan geibes,
is seboc sar slaidess
a eocho fa dess.
Is crdatta in cua,
is demin don-rua,
ra fess, ni ba tua,
dobeir dn in tress.

Mairg bhas isin tulaig
ar cind in chon cubaid,
barrarngert-sa n uraid
ticfad giped chuin.
C na hEmna Macha,
c co n-deilb cach datha,
c chrichi, c catha,
dochlunim rar cluin.

"Come, gilla," said Ferdiad; "for what reason laudest thou this man ever since I am come from my house? And it is almost a cause for strife with thee that thou hast praised him thus highly. But, Ailill and Medb have prophesied to me that this man will fall by my hand. And since it is for a reward, he shall quickly be torn asunder by me, but it is time to fetch help." And he spake these words, and the henchman responded:
Maith a gillaa, bar Fer diad, ga fth ma ra molais in fer sain thanac tig, & is suail nach fatha conais dait a romt ros molais, & barairngert Ailill & Medb dam-sa go taetsad in fer sain lemm. Acus dig is dar cend lage locherthair lem-sa colluath . Acus is mithig in chobair. Acus rabert na briathra and & ra recair in gilla:

Ferdiad: "'Tis time now to help me;
Be silent! cease praising!
'Twas no deed of friendship,
No doom o'er the brink(?)
The Champion of Cualnge,
Thou seest 'midst proud feats,
For that it's for guerdon,
Shall quickly be slain!"
The Henchman: "I see Cualnge's hero,
With feats overweening,
Not fleeing he flees us,
But towards us he comes.
He runneth-- not slowly--
Though cunning-- not sparing--
Like water down high cliff
Or thunderbolt quick!"

Ferdiad: "'Tis cause of a quarrel,
So much thou hast praised him;
And why hast thou chose him,
Since I am from home?
And now they extol him,
They fall to proclaim him;
None come to attack him,
But soft simple men(?)."
Is mithig in chabair,
b tost dn nach m-bladaig,
nar bhu gnm ar codail,
dig ni brth dar brach.
Match churaid Cualnge
co n-adabraib ualle,
daig is dar cend luage,
locherthair collath.
Mtchm curaid Cualnhge
co n-adabraib ualle,
nir teiched tet unne,
act is cucaind tic.
Rethid is n romll,
gid rogath ni rogand,
mar dusci dforall]
n mar thoraind tricc.

Suail nach fotha (conais)
aromt ras molaiss,
ga fth ma ra thogais,
thnac tig.
Issinnossa thcbhait,
att ac a fuacairt,
ni thecat da fuapairt
acht athig mith.

Here followeth the Description of Cuchulain's chariot, one of the three chief Chariots of the Tale of the Foray of Cualnge.


It was not long that Ferdiad's charioteer remained there when he saw something: a beautiful, five-pointed chariot, approaching with swiftness, with speed, with perfect skill; with a green shade, with a thin-framed, dry-bodied (?) box surmounted with feats of cunning, straight-poled, as long as a warrior's sword. On this was room for a hero's seven arms, the fair seat for its lord; behind two fleet steeds, large-eared, gaily prancing, with inflated nostrils, broad-chested, quick-hearted, high-flanked, broad-hoofed, slender-limbed, overpowering and resolute. A grey, broad-hipped, small-stepping, long-maned horse was under one of the yokes of the chariot; a black, crisped-maned, swift-moving, broad-backed horse under the other. Like unto a hawk after its prey on a sharp tempestuous day, or to a tearing blast of wind of Spring on a March day over the back of a plain, or unto a startled stag when first roused by the hounds in the first of the chase, were Cuchulain's two horses before the chariot, as if they were on glowing, fiery flags, so that they shook the earth and made it tremble with the fleetness of their course.
Nir bho chian d'araid Fir diad, dia m-bi and, co facca n: in carpat cin cicrind, gollth gollais go lngliccus, go pupaill uanide, go creit chraestana chraestrim, chlessaird cholgfata churata, ar da n-echaib latha lemnecha, mair bulid bedgaig, bolgrin, uchtlethna, beochridi, blenarda basslethna cosschaela, forttrna, forrncha fua. Ech lath leslethan, lugleimnech lebormonhgach, fn dara chuing don charpait, ech dub dalach dulbrass druimlethan fn chuing araill. Ba samalta ra sebacc da chlaiss ill chruadgithi, n ra sidi rpgaithi erraig illo mrtai dar muni machairi, na ra tetag n-allaid arna chetgluasacht do chonaib do chtri da ech Conculaind immon carpat, mar bad ar licc in tentidi, con crothsat & con bertsat in talmain, ra tricci na drma.

And Cuchulain reached the ford. Ferdiad waited on the south side of the ford; Cuchulain stood on the north side. Ferdiad bade welcome to Cuchulain. "Welcome is thy coming, O Cuchulain!" said Ferdiad. "Truly spoken meseemed thy welcome till now," answered Cuchulain; "but to-day I put no more trust in it. And, O Ferdiad," said Cuchulain, "it were fitter for me to bid thee welcome than that thou should'st welcome me; for it is thou that art come to the land and province wherein I dwell, and it is not fitting for thee to come to contend and do battle with me but it were fitter for me to go to contend and do battle with thee. For before thee in flight are my women and my boys and my youths, my steeds and my troops of horses, my droves, my flocks and my herds of cattle."
Acus dariacht Cuchulaind dochum inn tha. Tarrasair Fer diad barsan leith descertach ind tha. Dessid Cuchulaind barsan leith tascertach. Firis Fer diad failte fri Coinculaind. Mochen do thictu a Chuchulaind, bar Fer diad. Tarissi lim n ind falti mad cos trath sa, bar Cuchulaind, & indiu ni denaim tarissi de chena. Acus a Fir diad, bar Cuchulaind, ra po chru dam-sa flti d'ferthain frit-su na dait-siu a ferthain rum-sa, dig is tu dariacht in crch & in coiced it-sa. Acus n rachor duit-siu tchtain do chomlund & do chomrac rim-sa & ra pa choru dam-sa dol do chomlond & do chomrac rut-su, dag is romut-su att mo mna-sa & mo meic & mo maccemi, m'eich & m'echrada, m'albi & m'iti & m'indili.

"Good, O Cuchulain," spake Ferdiad; "what has ever brought thee out to contend and do battle with me? For when we were together with Scathach and with Uathach and with Aif, thou wast my serving-man, even for arming my spear and dressing my bed." "That was indeed true," answered Cuchulain; "because of my youth and my littleness did I so much for thee, but this is by no means my mood this day. For there is not a warrior in the world I would not drive off this day."
Maith a Chuchulaind, bar Fer diad, cid rot tuc-su do chomlund & do chomrac rim-sa itir, dag d m-bammar ac Scthaig & ac Uathaig & ac ifi, is tussu ba forbhfer frithalma damsa, .i. ra armad mo slega & ra dirged mo lepaid. Is fr m sain ale, bar Cuchulaind, ar ice & ar itidchi donin-sea duit-siu, acus n h sin tuarascbil bha t-sa indiu itir, acht ni fil barsin bith laech nach dingeb-sa indiu.

And then it was that each of them cast sharp-cutting reproaches at the other, renouncing his friendship. And Ferdiad spake these words there, and Cuchulain responded:
Acus iss and-sin ferais cechtar n-i db athcossan n-athgr n-athcharatraid rraile. Acus rabert Fer diad na briathra and & ra recair Cuchulaind:

Ferdiad: "What led thee, O Cua,
To fight a strong champion?
Thy flesh will be gore-red
O'er smoke of thy steeds!
Alas for thy journey,
A kindling of firebrands;
In sore need of healing,
If home thou shouldst reach!"
Cuchulain: "I'm come before warriors
Around the herd's wild Boar,
Before troops and hundreds,
To drown thee in deep
In anger, to prove thee
In hundred-fold battle,
Till on thee come havoc,
Defending thy head!"

Ferdiad: "Here stands one to crush thee,
'Tis I will destroy thee,
. . . . .
From me there shall come
The flight of their warriors
In presence of Ulster,
That long they'll remember
The loss that was theirs!"

Cuchulain: "How then shall we combat?
For wrongs shall we heave sighs?
Despite all, we'll go there,
To fight on the ford!
Or is it with hard swords,
Or e'en with red spear-points,
Before hosts to slay thee,
If thy hour hath come?"

Ferdiad: "'Fore sunset, 'fore nightfall--
If need be, then guard thee--
I'll fight thee at Bairch,
Not bloodlessly fight!
The Ulstermen call thee,
'He has him!' Oh, hearken!
The sight will distress them
That through them will pass!"

Cuchulain: "In danger's gap fallen,
At hand is thy life's term;
On thee plied be weapons,
Not gentle the skill!
One champion will slay thee;
We both will encounter;
No more shalt lead forays,
From this day till Doom!"

Ferdiad: "Avaunt with thy warnings,
Thou world's greatest braggart;
Nor guerdon nor pardon,
Low warrior for thee!
'Tis I that well know thee,
Thou heart of a cageling--
This lad merely tickles--
Without skill or force!"

Cuchulain: "When we were with Scathach,
For wonted arms' training,
Together we'd fare forth,
To seek every fight.
Thou wast my heart's comrade,
My clan and my kinsman;
Ne'er found I one dearer;
Thy loss would be sad!"

Ferdiad: "Thou wager'st thine honour
Unless we do battle;
Before the cock croweth,
Thy head on a spit!
Cuchulain of Cualnge,
Mad frenzy hath seized thee
All ill we'll wreak on thee,
For thine is the sin!"
F. d.: Cid ratuc a chua
do throit ra nad nua,
bud croderg da chrua
as analaib th'ech.
Mairg (tanic) do thurus,
bhud atd ra haires,
ricfa a less do legess,
mad da ris do thech.
Cc.: Dodechad r n-caib
im torc trethan trtaig
re cathaib re ctaib
dot chur-su fan lind
d'feirg rut is dot romad
bar comrac ct conar,
co rop dait bas fogal
do chosnom do chind.

F. d.: Fai sund nech rat mla,
is missi rat gna
. . . . . . . .
dag is dm facrith (.i. tic)
conugud a cura
i fiadnassi Ulad,
go rop cian bas chuman
go rop dib bus dth.

Cc.: Car cinnas condricfam,
in ar collaib cneittfem.
gid leind rarrficfam
do chomrac ar th.
inn ar claidbib cradaib
n nar rennaib radaib
dot slaidi rt sluagaib
ma thnic a thrth.

F. d.: Re funiud re n-aidchi,
madit eicen airrthe,
comrac dait re Bairche (.i. sliab)
n ba bn in glo.
Ulaid acot gairm-siu
rangabastar aillsiu,
bud olc dib in taidbsiu,
rachthair thairsiu is tro.

Cc.: Dat rla i m-beirn m-baegail,
tanic cend do saegail,
imbrthair fort febair,
n ba fill in fth.
Bud morglonnach bias,
condricfa cach dis,
ni ba toesech tris
t andiu go ti brth.

F. d.: Beir ass dn do robhud,
is tu is brassi for domon,
nt fia luag na logud,
ni dat doss s duss.
Is missi rat fitir
a chride ind eoin ittig,
at gilla co n-gicgil
gan gasced gan gus.

Cc.: Da m-bammar ac Scathaig
allus gascid gnathaig,
is aren imreidms,
imthigms cach fch.
Tu mo chocne cride,
tu m'aiccme, tu m'fine,
ni fuar riam bad dile,
badursan do dth.

F. d.: Romr fcbai th'einech
conna dernam deibech,
siul gairmes in cailech,
biaid do chend ar bir.
A Chuchulaind Cualnge,
rot gab baile is badre,
rot fa cach olc uanne,
dig is dait a chin.

"Come now, O Ferdiad," cried Cuchulain, "not meet was it for thee to come to contend and do battle with me, because of the instigation and intermeddling of Ailill and Medb. And all that came because of those promises of deceit, neither profit nor success did it bring them, and they have fallen by me. And none the more, Ferdiad, shall it win victory or increase of fame for thee; and, shalt thou too fall by my hand!" Thus he spake, and he further uttered these words and Ferdiad hearkened to him:--
Maith a Fir diad, bar Cuchulaind, nir chir duit-siu tiachtain do chomlund & do chomrac rum-sa tr indlach & etarchossit Ailella & Medba, & cach oen tanic ni ruc buaid na bissech dib, & darochratar limm-sa, & n m bras baid na bissech duit-siu & ra fethaisiu limm. Is amlaid ra bi g rd & rabert na briathra, & ra gab Fer diad clostecht fris.

"Come not nigh me, noble chief,
Ferdiad, comrade, Daman's son.
Worse for thee than 'tis for me;
Thou'lt bring sorrow to a host!
"Come not nigh me 'gainst all right;
Thy last bed is made by me.
Why shouldst thou alone escape
From the prowess of my arms?

"Shall not great feats thee undo,
Though thou'rt purple, horny-skinned?
And the maid thou boastest of,
Shall not, Daman's son, be thine!

"Finnabair, Medb's daughter fair,
Great her charms though they may be,
Fair as is the damsel's form,
She's for thee not to enjoy!

"Finnabair, the king's own child,
Is the lure, if truth be told;
Many they whom she's deceived
And undone as she has thee!

"Break not, weetless, oath with me;
Break not friendship, break not bond;
Break not promise, break not word;
Come not nigh me, noble chief!

"Fifty chiefs obtained in plight
This same maid, a proffer vain.
Through me went they to their graves;
Spear-right all they had from me!

"Though for brave was held Ferbaeth,
With whom was a warriors' train,
In short space I quelled his rage;
Him I slew with one sole blow!

"Srubdar-- sore sank his might--
Darling of the noblest dames,
Time there was when great his fame--
Gold nor raiment saved him not!

"Were she mine affianced wife,
Smiled on me this fair land's head,
I would not thy body hurt,
Right nor left, in front, behind!"
Na tair chucum a lich lin
a Fir diad, a meic Damain,
is messu duit nam-bia de,
contirfe brn sochaide.
Na tair chucum dar fircert,
is lim-sa at do thiglecht,
cid nabreth and dait namm
mo gleo-sa ramileda.

Nachat mucled ilar cless,
girsat corcra conhganchness,
inn ingen asati oc big,
ni ba lett a meic Damin.

Findabair ingea Medba,
ge beith d'febas a delba,
in ingen gid cem a cruth,
nochos tibrea re ctluth.

Findabair ingen in rg,
ind rth atberar a fr,
sochaide mattart bric
acus do loitt do letheit.

Na briss form lugi gan fess,
na bris chg, na briss cairdess,
na briss brethir bag,
na tair chucum a laich lin.

Ra dled do choicait lach
in ingen, n dal dimbaeth,
is limm-sa ra fid allecht,
ni rucsat uaim acht crandchert.

Gia ramaess menmnach Fer beth
aca m-bi teglach daglaech,
gar ar gur furmius a bruth,
ra marbus din oen urchur.

Srubdaire serb seirge a gal,
ba rnbale na ct m-ban,
mr a bladalt ra bi than,
ni ranacht r na etgad.

Da m-bad dam ra naidmthea in bein,
ris tib cend na coiced cain,
nocho dergfaind-se do chlab
tess na tuaid na thiar na thair.

"Good, O Ferdiad!" cried Cuchulain. "It is not right for thee to come to fight and combat with me; for when we were with Scathach and with Uathach and with Aif, and it was together we were used to seek out every battle and every battle-field, every combat and every contest, every wood and every desert, every covert and every recess." And thus he spake and he uttered these words:
Maith a Fir diad, bar Cuchulaind, is aire-sin na rachir duit-siu tiachtain do chomlund & do chomruc rim-sa, dig da m-bammar ac Scathaig & ac Uathaig & ac Aife, is aron imthigms cach cath & cach cathri, cach comlund & cach comrac, cach fid & cach fsach, cach dorcha & cach diamair. Acus is amlaid ra bi g rada & rbert na briathra and:

Cuchulain: "We were heart-companions once;
We were comrades in the woods;
We were men that shared a bed,
When we slept the heavy sleep,
After hard and weary fights.
Into many lands, so strange,
Side by side we sallied forth,
And we ranged the woodlands through,
When with Scathach we learned arms!"
Ferdiad: "O Cuchulain, rich in feats,
Hard the trade we both have learned;
Treason hath o'ercome our love;
Thy first wounding hath been bought;
Think not of our friendship more,
Cua, it avails thee not!"
Ropdhar cocle cridi,
ropdhar caemthe caille,
ropdhar fir chomdeirgide,
contulmis tromchotlud
ar trommnthaib
i crchaib ilib echtrannaib.
aroen imreidms
imtheigms cach fid
forcetul fri Scathaig.
A Chuchulaind chaemchlessach, bar Fer diad,
ra chindsem ceird comdana,
ra chliset cuir caratraid,
bocritha do chetguine.
na cumnig in comaltus,
a chua nachat chobradar.

"Too long are we now in this way," quoth Ferdiad; "and what arms shall we resort to to-day, O Cuchulain?" "With thee is thy choice of weapons this day," answered Cuchulain, "for thou art he that first didst reach the ford." "Rememberest thou at all," asked Ferdiad "the choice deeds of arms we were wont to practise with Scathach and with Uathach and with Aif?" "Indeed, and I do remember," answered Cuchulain. "If thou rememberest, let us begin with them."
Rofata atm amlaid-seo bhadesta, bar Fer diad, acus ga gasced ar a ragam indiu, a Chuchulaind. Lat-su do roga gascid chaidchi indiu, bar Cuchulaind, daig is t dariacht in n-th ar tus. Indat mebhair-siu itir, bar Fer diad, isna airigthib gascid danmms ac Scathaig & ac Uathaig & ac Aife. Isamm mebhair m cin, bar Cuchulaind. Masa mebair, tecam.

They betook them to their choicest deeds of arms. They took upon them two equally-matched shields for feats, and their eight-edged targes for feats, and their eight small darts, and their eight straightswords with ornaments of walrus-tooth and their eight lesser, ivoried spears which flew from them and to them like bees on a day of fine weather. They cast no weapon that struck not. Each of them was busy casting at the other with those missiles from morning's early twilight till noon at mid-day, the while they overcame their various feats with the bosses and hollows of their feat-shields. However great the excellence of the throwing on either side, equally great was the excellence of the defence, so that during all that time neither of them bled or reddened the other. "Let us cease now from this bout of arms, O Cuchulain," said Ferdiad; "for it is not by such our decision will come." "Yea, surely, let us cease, if the time hath come," answered Cuchulain. Then they ceased. They threw their feat-tackle from them into the hands of their charioteers.
Dachuatarbar a n-airigthib gascid. Ra gabsatar d sciath chliss chmardathacha forro & an-ochtn-ocharchliss, an-ocht clettni & a n-ocht cuilg n-dt & a n-ocht n-gothnatta net, imreits athu & chuccu mar beocho anle (no aille), ni thelgtis nad amsitis. Ra gab cch db ac diburgun araile dina clesradaib sin dorblas na matne muche go mide medoin li, go ra chloesetar a n-ilchlessarda ra tilib & chobradaib na scath cliss. Gia ra bai d'febas in imdburcthi, ra bi d'febas na himdegla nra fulig & nara forderg cch dib bar araile risin r sin. Scurem din gaisced sa fodesta a Chuchulaind, bar Fer diad, dig ni de-seo tic ar n-eterglod. Scurem m cin, ma thanic a thrath, bar Cuchulaind. Ra scoirsetar. Focherdsetar a clesrada uathaib illamaib a n-arad.

"To what weapons shall we resort next, O Cuchulain?" asked Ferdiad. "Thine is the choice of weapons till nightfall," replied Cuchulain; "for thou art he that didst first reach the ford." "Let us begin, then," said Ferdiad, "with our straight-cut, smooth-hardened throwing-spears, with cords of full-hard flax on them." "Aye, let us begin then," assented Cuchulain. Then they took on them two hard shields, equally strong. They fell to their straight-cut, smooth-hardened spears with cords of full-hard flax on them. Each of them was engaged in casting at the other with the spears from the middle of noon till the hour of evening's sundown. However great the excellence of the defence, equally great was the excellence of the throwing on either side, so that each of them bled and reddened and wounded the other during that time. "Let us leave off from this now, O Cuchulain," said Ferdiad. "Aye, let us leave off, if the time hath come," answered Cuchulain. So they ceased. They threw their arms from them into the hands of their charioteers.
Ga gasced irragam ifesta, a Chuchulaind, bar Fer diad. Let-su do roga gaiscid chaidche, bar Cuchulaind, dag is t doracht in n-th ar ts. Tiagam iarum, bar Fer diad, bar ar slegaib sneitti snasta slemunchradi go suanemnaib ln lanchatut indi. Tecam m cin, bar Cuchulaind. Is and-sin ra gabsatar da chotutscath chomdaingni forro. Dachuatar bar a slegaib snaitti snasta slemunchradi, go suanemnaib ln lanchotut indi. Ra gab cch db ac diburgun araile dina slegaib mide medoin lai go trth funid nna. Gia ra bi d'febas na himdegla, ra bi d'febas ind imdibairgthi, go ro fuilig & go ro forderg & go ra chrchtnaig cach db bar araile risin r sin. Scurem de sodain badesta, a Chuchulaind, bar Fer diad. Scurem m cin, ma thanic a thrath, bar Cuchulaind. Ra scoirsetar. Bhacheirdset a n-airm uathu illmaib a n-arad.

Thereupon each of them went toward the other in the middle of the ford, and each of them put his hand on the other's neck and gave him three kisses. Their horses were in one and the same paddock that night, and their charioteers at one and the same fire; and their charioteers made ready a litter-bed of fresh rushes for them with pillows for wounded men on them. Then came healing and curing folk to heal and to cure them, and they laid healing herbs and grasses and a curing charm on their cuts and stabs, their gashes and many wounds. Of every healing herb and grass and curing charm that was brought and was applied to the cuts and stabs, to the gashes and many wounds of Cuchulain, a like portion thereof he sent across the ford westward to Ferdiad, so that the men of Erin should not have it to say, should Ferdiad fall at his hands, it was more than his share of care had been given to him.
Tanic cach db d'indsaigid araile assa aithle & rabert cch db lm dar bragit araile & ra thairbir teora pc. Ra batar a n-eich i n-oenscur inn aidchi sin & a n-araid ic oentenid, acus bognisetar a n-araid cossair leptha rluachra dib go frithadartaib fer n-gona friu. Tancatar fiallach cci & legis da n-cc & da leiges, acus focherdetar lubi & lossa icci & slnsn ra cnedaib & ra crechtaib, r n-ltaib & ra n-ilgonaib. Cach lib & cach lossa cci & slnsen ra berthea ra cnedaib & crechtaib, altaib & ilgonaib Conculaind, ra idnaicthea comraind ad db dar ath siar d'Fir diad, nar abbraitis fir hErend, da tuitted Fer diad lessium, ba himmarcraid legis daberad fair.

Of every food and of every savoury, soothing and strong drink that was brought by the men of Erin to Ferdiad, a like portion thereof he sent over the ford northwards to Cuchulain; for the purveyors of Ferdiad were more numerous than the purveyors of Cuchulain. All the men of Erin were purveyors to Ferdiad, to the end that he might keep Cuchulain off from them. But only the inhabitants of Mag Breg ('the Plain of Breg') were purveyors to Cuchulain. They were wont to come daily, that is, every night, to converse with him.
Cach biad & cach lind sola socharchin somesc daberthea o feraib hErend d'Fir diad, da idnaicthea comraind uad db dar th fa thuaith do Choinchulaind, daig raptar lia biattaig Fir diad and battaig Conculaind. Raptar biattaig fir hErend uli d'Fir diad ar Choinculaind do dingbil db. Raptar biattaig Brega dana do Choinculaind. Tictis da acaldaim fri d .i. cach n-aidche.

They bided there that night. Early on the morrow they arose and went their ways to the ford of combat. "To what weapons shall we resort on this day, O Ferdiad?" asked Cuchulain. "Thine is the choosing of weapons," Ferdiad made answer, "because it was I had my choice of weapons on the day aforegone." "Let us take, then," said Cuchulain, "to our great, well-tempered lances to-day, for we think that the thrusting will bring nearer the decisive battle to-day than did the casting of yesterday. Let our horses be brought to us and our chariots yoked, to the end that we engage in combat over our horses and chariots on this day." "Aye, let us go so," Ferdiad assented.
Dessetar and inn aidchi sin. Atrchtatar go moch arna barach, & tncatar rompu co th in chomraic. Ga gasced ara ragam indiu a Fir diad, bar Cuchulaind. Lett-su do roga n-gascid chaidchi, bar Fer diad, dag is missi barroega mo roga n-gascid isind lathi luid. Tiagam iarum, bar Cuchulaind, bar ar mnaisib mra murniucha indiu, dig is foicsiu lind don g in t-imrubad indiu anda dond imdiburgun inn. Gabtar ar n-eich dn & indliter ar carpait, co n-dernam cathugud dar n-echaib & dar carptib indiu. Tecam m cin, bar Fer diad.

Thereupon they girded two full-firm broadshields on them for that day. They took to their great, well-tempered lances on that day. Either of them began to pierce and to drive, to throw and to press down the other, from early morning's twilight till the hour of evening's close. If it were the wont for birds in flight to fly through the bodies of men, they could have passed through their bodies on that day and carried away pieces of blood and flesh through their wounds and their sores into the clouds and the air all around. And when the hour of evening's close was come, their horses were spent and their drivers were wearied, and they themselves, the heroes and warriors of valour, were exhausted. "Let us give over now, O Ferdiad," said Cuchulain, "for our horses are spent and our drivers tired, and when they are exhausted, why should we too not be exhausted?" And in this wise he spake, and he uttered these words at that place:
Is and-sin ra gabsatar d lethanscath landangni forro in l sin. Dachuatar bar a manisib mra murnecha in l sin. Ra gab cch db bar tollad & bar tregdad, bar ruth & bar regtad araile, dorblas na matne muchi go trth funid nna. Da m-bad bs oin ar luamain do thecht tri chorpaib dene, doragtas tri na corpaib in l sin, go m-brtais na tochta fola & fola tri na cnedaib & tri na crechtaib innlaib & i n-aeraib sechtair. Acus a thnic trath funid nna, raptar sctha a n-eich & raptar mertnig a n-araid & raptar sctha-som fadessin na curaid & na lith gaile. Scurem de sodain badesta a Fir diad, bar Cuchulaind, dag isat sctha ar n-eich & it mertnig ar n-araid, acus in trth ata sctha iat, cid dnni na bad sctha sind dana. Acus is amlaid ra bi g rd & rabert na briathra and:


"We need not our chariots break--
This, a struggle fit for giants.
Place the hobbles on the steeds,
Now that din of arms is o'er!" Ni dlegar dn cuclaigi, bar siun,
ra fomorchaib feidm.
curther fthu a n-urchomail,
a ro scich a n-deilm.
"Yea, we will cease, if the time hath come," replied Ferdiad. They ceased then. They threw their arms away from them into the hands of their charioteers. Each of them came towards his fellow. Each laid his hand on the other's neck and gave him three kisses. Their horses were in the one pen that night, and their charioteers at the one fire. Their charioteers prepared two litter-beds of fresh rushes for them with pillows for wounded men on them. The curing and healing men came to attend and watch and mark them that night; for naught else could they do, because of the direfulness of their cuts and their stabs, their gashes and their numerous wounds, but apply to them philtres and spells and charms, to staunch their blood and their bleeding and their deadly pains. Of every magic potion and every spell and every charm that was applied to the cuts and stabs of Cuchulain, their like share he sent over the ford westwards to Ferdiad. Of every food and every savoury, soothing and strong drink that was brought by the men of Erin to Ferdiad, an equal portion he sent over the ford northwards to Cuchulain, for the victuallers of Ferdiad were more numerous than the victuallers of Cuchulain. For all the men of Erin were Ferdiad's nourishers, to the end that he might ward off Cuchulain from them. But the indwellers of the Plain of Breg alone were Cuchulain's nourishers. They were wont to come daily, that is, every night, to converse with him.
Scoirem m cin, m thnic a thrth, bar Fer diad. Ra scorsetar. Facheirdset a n-airm uathu illmaib a n-arad. Tanic cch db d'innaigid a cheile. Ra bert cach lam dar brgit araile, & ra thairbir teora pc. Ra btar a n-eich i n-oenscur in aidchi sin, & a n-araid oc oentenid. Bgniset a n-araid cossair leptha rluachra dib go frithadartaib fer n-gona friu. Tancatar fiallach icci & leigis da fethium & da fgad & d forcomt inn aidchi sin, dag n n aile ra chumgetar dib, ra hacbeile a cned & a crechta, a n-lta & a n-ilgona, acht iptha & le & arthana do chur riu, do thairmesc a fola & a fulliugu & a n-gae cr. Cach iptha & gach le & gach orthana doberthea ra cnedaib & ra crectaib Conculaind, ra idnaicthea comraind uad db dar th siar d'Fir diad. Cach biad & cach lind sola socharchain somesc ra berthea o feraib hErend do Fir diad, ra hidnaicthea comraind ad db dar th fothuaith do Choinchulaind, daig raptar lia biataig Fir diad anda biataig Conculaind, daig raptar biattaig fir hErend uile d'Fir diad ar dingbhail Conculaind db. Raptar biataig Brega no do Choinchulaind. Tictis da acallaim fri d .i. cach n-aidche.

They abode there that night. Early on the morrow they arose and repaired to the ford of combat. Cuchulain marked an evil mien and a dark mood that day on Ferdiad. "It is evil thou appearest to-day, O Ferdiad," spake Cuchulain; "thy hair has become dark to-day, and thine eye has grown drowsy, and thine upright form and thy features and thy gait have gone from thee!" "Truly not for fear nor for dread of thee is that happened to me to-day," answered Ferdiad; "for there is not in Erin this day a warrior I could not repel!" And Cuchulain lamented and moaned, and he spake these words and Ferdiad responded:
Dessetar inn aidchi sin and. Atroachtatar co moch arna barach, & tncatar rempo co th in chomraic. Ra chondaic Cuchulaind mdelb & mthemel mr in la sin bar Fer diad. Is olc atai-siu indiu a Fir diad, bar Cuchulaind. Ra dorchaig th'folt indi & ra suanmig do rosc & dachuaid do chruth & do delb & do denam dt. Nir th'ecla-su na ar th'uamain form-sa sain indiu m, bar Fer diad, dig ni fuil i n-hErind indiu laech na dingeb-sa. Acus ra bi Cuchulaind ac cini & ac airchisecht & rabert na briathra and & ra recair Fer diad:

Cuchulain: "Ferdiad, ah, if it be thou,
Well I know thou'rt doomed to die!
To have gone at woman's hest,
Forced to fight thy comrade sworn!"
Ferdiad: "O Cuchulain-- wise decree--
Loyal champion, hero true,
Each man is constrained to go
'Neath the sod that hides his grave!"

Cuchulain: "Finnabair, Medb's daughter fair,
Stately maiden though she be,
Not for love they'll give to thee,
But to prove thy kingly might!"

Ferdiad: "Provd was my might long since,
Cu of gentle spirit thou.
Of one braver I've not heard;
Till to-day I have not found!"

Cuchulain: "Thou art he provoked this fight,
Son of Daman, Dar's son,
To have gone at woman's word,
Swords to cross with thine old friend!"

Ferdiad: "Should we then unfought depart,
Brothers though we are, bold Hound,
Ill would be my word and fame
With Ailill and Cruachan's Medb!"

Cuchulain: "Food has not yet passed his lips,
Nay nor has he yet been born,
Son of king or blameless queen,
For whom I would work thee harm!"

Ferdiad: "Culann's Hound, with floods of deeds,
Medb, not thou, hath us betrayed;
Fame and victory thou shalt have;
Not on thee we lay our fault!"

Cuchulain: "Clotted gore is my brave heart,
Near I'm parted from my soul;
Wrongful 'tis-- with hosts of deeds--
Ferdiad, dear, to fight with thee!"
Cc.: A Fir diad masa th,
demin limm isat lomthru
tidaeht ar comairli mn
do chomlund rit chomalta.
F.: A Chuchulaind, comall n-gith,
a frnraith, a firlaich,
is eicen do neoch a thecht
cosin ft forsa m-b a thiglecht.

Cc.: Findabair ingea Medba,
gia beith d'febas a delba,
a tabairt dait n ar do sheirc
act do romad do rigneirt.

F.: Fromtha mo nert a chanaib,
a Ch cosin caemriagail,
nech bad chalmu noco closs,
cosindiu no con fuaross.

Cc.: Tu fodera a fail de
a meic Damain meic Dre
tiachtain ar comairle mn
d'imchlaidbed rit chomalta.

F.: Da scaraind gan troit is t,
gidar comaltai a chaemch,
bud olc mo briathar is mo blad
ie Ailill is ac Meidb Chruachan.

Cc.: Noco tard bad da blaib
is noco mo ro genair,
do rg na rgain can chess,
bhar a n-dernaird-sea th'amles.

F.: A Chuchulaind tlaib gal,
n tu acht Medb rar marnestar,
bra-su buaid acus blaid,
n fort att ar cinaid.

Cc.:Is cap cr ino chride cain,
bec nach rascloss ram anmain,
n comnairt limin lnib gal
comrac rit a Fir diad.

"How much soever thou findest fault with me to-day," said Ferdiad, "it will be as an offset to my prowess." And he said, "To what weapons shall we resort to-day?" "With thyself is the choice of weapons to-day," replied Cuchulain, "for it is I that chose on the day gone by." "Let us resort, then," said Ferdiad, "to our heavy, hard-smiting swords this day, for we trow that the smiting each other will bring us nearer to the decision of battle to-day than was our piercing each other on yesterday." "Let us go then, by all means," responded Cuchulain.
Meid ati-siu ac cessacht form-sa indiu, bar Fer diad, ga gasced for a ragam indiu. Lett-su do roga gascid chaidchi indiu, bar Cuchulaind, dig is missi barrega in lathe luid. Tiagam iaram, bar Fer diad, bar ar claidbib tromma tortbullecha indiu, dig is facsiu lind dond g inn imslaidi indiu and dond imrubad ind. Tecam m cin, bar Cuchulaind.

Then they took two full-great long-shields upon them for that day. They turned to their heavy, hard-smiting swords. Each of them fell to strike and to hew, to lay low and cut down, to slay and undo his fellow, till as large as the head of a month-old child was each lump and each cut, that each of them took from the shoulders and thighs and shoulder-blades of the other.
Is and-sain ra gabsatar d leborscath lnmra forro in l sain. Dochuatar bar a claidbib tromma tortbullecha. Ra gab cch db bar slaide & bar slechtad, bar airlech & bar slechtad, bar airlech & bar essorgain, go m-ba metithir ri cend meic ms cach thothocht & gach thinmi dobeired cch db de gallib & de slastaib & de slinnocaib araile.

Each of them was engaged in smiting the other in this way from the twilight of early morning till the hour of evening's close. "Let us leave off from this now, O Cuchulain!" cried Ferdiad. "Aye, let us leave off, if the hour has come," said Cuchulain. They parted then, and threw their arms away from them into the hands of their charioteers. Though it had been the meeting of two happy, blithe, cheerful, joyful men, their parting that night was of two that were sad, sorrowful and full of suffering. Their horses were not in the same paddock that night. Their charioteers were not at the same fire.
Ra gab cch db ac slaide araile mn cir sin a dorblass na matni muchi co trth funid nna. Scurem do sodain badesta a Chuchulaind, bar Fer diad. Scorem m cin, ma thanic a thrth, bar Cuchulaind. Ra scorsetar, facheirdsetar a n-airm adaib illamaib a n-arad. Girbho chomraicthi da subach smach sobbrnach somenmnach, ra pa da scarthain da n-dubach n-dobbrnach n-domenmnach a scarthain inn aidchi sin. Ni ra batar a n-eich i n-oenscur inn aidchi sin. Ni ra batar a n-araid ac oentenid.

They passed there that night. It was then that Ferdiad arose early on the morrow and went alone to the ford of combat. For he knew that that would be the decisive day of the battle and combat; and he knew that one or other of them would fall there that day, or that they both would fall. It was then he donned his battle-weed of battle and fight and combat, or ever Cuchulain came to meet him. And thus was the manner of this harness of battle and fight and combat: He put his silken, glossy trews with its border of speckled gold, next to his white skin. Over this, outside, he put his brown-leathern, well-sewed kilt. Outside of this he put a huge, goodly flag, the size of a millstone. He put his solid, very deep, iron kilt of twice molten iron over the huge, goodly flag as large as a millstone, through fear and dread of the Gae Bulga on that day.
Dessetar inn aidchi sin and. Is and-sin atruacht Fer diad go moch arna barach acus tanic reme a oenur co ath in chomraic, dag ra fitir rap -sin la etergleid in chomlaind & in chomraic & ra fitir co taetsad nechtar de db in la sain and, no co taetsaitis a n-ds. Is and-sin ra gabastar-som a chatherriud catha & comlaind & comraic immi re tiachtain do Choinchulaind d saigid. Acus bha don chatherriud chatha & chomlaind & comraic: Ra gabastar a fuathbric srebnaide sril cona cimais d'r bricc fa fri gelchness. Ra gabastar a fuathbric n-dondlethair n-degshuata tairrside immaich anechtair. Ra gabastar muadchloich mir mti clochi mulind tarrsi-side immuich anechtair. Ra gabastar a fuathbric n-imdanhgin n-imdomain n-iarnaide do iurn athlegtha dar in muadchloich mir mti clochi mulind ar ecla & ar uamun in gae bulga in la sin.

About his head he put his crested war-cap of battle and fight and combat, whereon were forty carbuncle-gems beautifully adorning it and studded with red-enamel and crystal and rubies and with shining stones of the Eastern world. His angry, fierce-striking spear he seized in his right hand. On his left side he hung his curved battle-falchion, with its golden pommel and its rounded hilt of red gold. On the arch-slope of his back he slung his massive, fine-buffalo shield of a warrior, whereon were fifty bosses, wherein a boar could be shown in each of its bosses, apart from the great central boss of red gold. Ferdiad performed diverse, brilliant, manifold, marvellous feats on high that day, unlearned from any one before, neither from foster-mother nor from foster-father, neither from Scathach nor from Uathach nor from Aif, but he found them of himself that day in the face of Cuchulain.
Ra gabastar a chrchathbarr catha & comlaind & comraic imma chend, barsa m-batar cethracha gemm carrmocail ac chanchumtuch, arna ecur de chruan & christaill & carrmocul & de lubib soillsi airthir bethad. Ra gabastar a sleig m-barnig m-bairendbailc ina deslim. Ra gabastar a chlaideb camthuagach catha bar a chlu cona urdorn ir & cona muleltaib de dergr. Ra gabastar a scath mr m-buabalchin bar a tuagleirg a dromma, barsa m-batar cica cobrad, bar a tillfed torc taisse(l)btha bar cach comraid db, cenmotha in comraid mir medonaig do dergr. Bacheird Fer diad clesrada na ilerda ingantacha imda bar aird in l sain, nad roeglaind ac nech aile ram, ac mumme na ac aite, na ac Scthaig nach ac Uathaig na ac Aife, acht a n-denum uad fin in la sain i n-agid Conculainn.

Cuchulain likewise came to the ford, and he beheld the various, brilliant, manifold, wonderful feats that Ferdiad performed on high. "Thou seest yonder, O Laeg my master, the divers, bright, numerous, marvellous feats that Ferdiad performs on high, and I shall receive yon feats one after the other. And, therefore, if defeat be my lot this day, do thou prick me on and taunt me and speak evil to me, so that the more my spirit and anger shall rise in me. If, however, before me his defeat takes place, say thou so to me and praise me and speak me fair, to the end that the greater may be my courage!" "It shall surely be done so, if need be, O Cucuc," Laeg answered.
Dariacht Cuchulaind dochum inn atha no, acus ra chonnaic na clesrada na ilerda ingantacha imda bacheird Fer diad bar aird. Atchi-siu st, a mo phopa Laig, na clesrada na ilerda ingantacha imda focheird Fer diad bar aird, & bocotidfer dam-sa ar n-uair innossa na clesrada t, & is aire-sin, mad forum-sa bus ren indiu, ara n-derna-su mo grsad & mo glmad & olc do rada rim, go rop mite er m'fr & m'fergg foromm. Mad romum bus ren no, ara n-derna-su mo mnod & mo molod & maithius do rd frim, go rop mti lim mo menma. Dagentar m cin a Chucuc, bar Laeg.

Then Cuchulain, too, girded his war-harness of battle and fight and combat about him, and performed all kinds of splendid, manifold, marvellous feats on high that day which he had not learned from any one before, neither with Scathach nor with Uathach nor with Aif.
Is and-sin ra gabastar Cuchulaind dno a chatherriud chatha & chomlaind & comraic imbi acus focheird clesrada na ilerda ingantacha imda bar aird in l sain nad roeglaind ac neoch aile ram, ac Scthaig na ac Uathaig na ac Aife.

Ferdiad observed those feats, and he knew they would be plied against him in turn. "To what weapons shall we resort to-day, Ferdiad?" asked Cuchulain. "With thee is thy choice of weapons," Ferdiad responded. "Let us go to the 'Feat of the Ford,' then," said Cuchulain. "Aye, let us do so," answered Ferdiad. Albeit Ferdiad spoke that, he deemed it the most grievous thing whereto he could go, for he knew that in that sort Cuchulain used to destroy every hero and every battle-soldier who fought with him in the 'Feat of the Ford.'
Atchondairc Fer diad na clesrada sain & ra fitir go fuigbithea d arn-uir iat. Ga gasced ar a ragam a Fir diad, bar Cuchulaind. Lett-su do roga gascid chaidchi, bar Fer diad. Tiagam far cluchi inn tha iarum, bar Cuchulaind. Tecam m, bar Fer diad. Gitubairt Fer diad inn sein, is air is doilgiu leis daragad, dig ra fitir iss ass ra forrged Cuchulaind cach caur & cach cathmilid condriced friss bar cluch (i) inn tha.

Great indeed was the deed that was done on the ford that day. The two heroes, the two champions, the two chariot-fighters of the west of Europe, the two bright torches of valour of the Gael, the two hands of dispensing favour and of giving rewards in the west of the northern world, the two veterans of skill and the two keys of bravery of the Gael, to be brought together in encounter as from afar, through the sowing of dissension and the incitement of Ailill and Medb. Each of them was busy hurling at the other in those deeds of arms from early morning's gloaming till the middle of noon. When mid-day came, the rage of the men became wild, and each drew nearer to the other.
Ba mr in gnm m daringned barsind ath in l sain. Na da niad, na da anruith, da eirrgi iarthair Eorpa, da anchaindil gascid Gaedel, da lam thidnaicthi ratha & tairberta [&] tuarastail iarthair thuascirt in domain, da nchaindil gascid Gaedel & da eochair gascid Gaedel, a comraicthi do chin mir tri indlach & etarchossit Ailella & Medba. Da gab cch db ac dburgun araile do na clesraidib sin a dorbblass na matni muchi go midi medoin li and. thnic medn li, ra feochraigesetar fergga na fer & ra chomfaicsigestar cach db d'araile.

Thereupon Cuchulain gave one spring once from the bank of the ford till he stood upon the boss of Ferdiad macDaman's shield, seeking to reach his head and to strike it from above over the rim of the shield. Straightway Ferdiad gave the shield a blow with his left elbow, so that Cuchulain went from him like a bird onto the brink of the ford. Again Cuchulain sprang from the brink of the ford, so that he alighted upon the boss of Ferdiad macDaman's shield, that he might reach his head and strike it over the rim of the shield from above. Ferdiad gave the shield a thrust with his left knee, so that Cuchulain went from him like an infant onto the bank of the ford.
Is andsin cindis Cuchulaind fecht n-oen and do ur inn atha go m-bi far cobraid sceith Fir diad meic Damin do thetractain a chind do bualad dar bil in scith ar n-uachtur. Is and-sin ra bert Fer diad bem da ullind cl sin scath, com-das-rala Cuchulaind ad mar n bar ur inn tha. Cindis Cuchulaind d'ur inn tha ars, co m-bi far cobraid scith Fir diad meic Damin do thetarrachtain a chind do bualad dar bil in scith ar n-uachtur. Ra bert Fer diad bim da gln chl sin sciath, gom-das-rala Cuchulaind uad mar inac m-bec bar ur inn tha.

Laeg espied that. "Woe then, Cuchulain!" cried Laeg; "meseems the battle-warrior that is against thee hath shaken thee as a fond woman shakes her child. He hath washed thee as a cup is washed in a tub. He hath ground thee as a mill grinds soft malt. He hath pierced thee as a tool bores through an oak. He hath bound thee as the bindweed binds the trees. He hath pounced on thee as a hawk pounces on little birds, so that no more hast thou right or title or claim to valour or skill in arms till the very day of doom and of life, thou little imp of an elf-man!" cried Laeg.
Arigis Laeg inn sein. Amac ale, bar Lag, rat chur in cathmilid fail itt agid mar chras ben bid a mac. Rot snigestar mar snegair cuip a lundu. Rat melestar mar miles mulend muadbraich. Ratregdastar mar thregdas fodb omnaid. Rat nascestar mar nasces feth fidu. Ras leic fort feib ras lec seg for mintu, connach fail do dluig na d dal na do dl ri gail na ra gaisced go brunni m-bratha & betha badesta, a siriti siabarthi bic, bar Leg.

Thereat for the third time, Cuchulain arose with the speed of the wind, and the swiftness of a swallow, and the dash of a dragon, and the strength (of a lion) into the clouds of the air, til he alighted on the boss of the shield of Ferdiad son of Daman, so as to reach his head that he might strike it from above over the rim of his shield. Then it was that the battle-warrior gave the shield a violent and powerful shake, so that Cuchulain flew from it into the middle of the ford, the same as if he had not sprung at all.
Is and-sain atraacht Cuchulaind illas na gaithi & i n-athlaimi na fandli & i n-dremni in drecain & innirt inn aeir in tresfecht, go m-bi far comraid scith Fir diad meic Damain do thetarrachtain a chind da bualad dar bil a scith ar n-uachtur. Is and-sin ra bert in cathmilid crothad barsin scath, com-das-rala Cuchulaind ad bar lr inn tha, mar bad nacharlebhad ram itir.

It was then the first twisting-fit of Cuchulain took place, so that a swelling and inflation filled him like breath in a bladder, until he made a dreadful, terrible, many-coloured, wonderful bow of himself, so that as big as a giant or a man of the sea was the hugely-brave warrior towering directly over Ferdiad.
Is and-sin ra chtriastrad im Choinculaind, go ros ln att & infithsi mar anl ills, co n-derna thaig n-uathmar n-acbil n-ildathaig n-ingantaig de, go m-ba metithir ra fomir na ra fer mara in milid mrchalma os chind Fir diad i certairddi.

Such was the closeness of the combat they made, that their heads encountered above and their feet below and their hands in the middle over the rims and bosses of the shields. Such was the closeness of the combat they made, that their shields burst and split from their rims to their centres. Such was the closeness of the combat they made, that their spears bent and turned and shivered from their tips to their rivets.
Ba se dlus n-imairic daronsatar, go ra chomraicsetar a cind ar n-uactur & a cossa ar n-ctur & allma ar n-irmedn dar bilib & chobradaib na sciath. Ba s dlus n-imaric daronsatar, go ro dluigset & go ro dloingset a sceith a m-bile go a m-brntib. Ba s dlus n-imaric daronsatar, go ro fillsetar & go ro lpsatar & go ro guasaigsetar a slega a rennad go a semannaib.

Such was the closeness of the combat they made, that the boccanach and the bananach and the sprites of the glens and the eldritch beings of the air screamed from the rims of their shields and from the guards of their swords and from the tips of their spears.
Ba s dls n-imaric daronsatar, go ra grsetar boccanaig & bananaig & geniti glinni & demna aeir do bhilib a scath & d'imdornaib a claideb & d'erlonnaib a slega.

Such was the closeness of the combat they made, that they forced the river out of its bed and out of its course, so that there might have been a reclining place for a king or a queen in the middle of the ford, and not a drop of water was in it but what fell there with the trampling and slipping which the two heroes and the two battle-warriors made in the middle of the ford.
Ba se dls n-imaric daronsatar, go ra lasetar in n-ab-(aind assa) curp & assa cumacta go (m-)ba (hionadh iondlaicthi) do rg n rgain ar lr inn tha, connach bi banna dh'usci and acht muni siled ind, risin suathfadaig & risin sloetradaig daringsetar na da curaid & na da cathmilid bar lr in tha.

Such was the closeness of the combat they made, that the steeds of the Gael broke loose affrighted and plunging with madness and fury, so that their chains and their shackles, their traces and tethers snapped, and the women and children and pygmy-folk, the weak and the madmen among the men of Erin broke out through the camp southwestward.
Ba s dls n-imaric daronsatar, go ro memaid do graigib Gaedel scroin & sceinmnig, diallaib & dsacht, go ro maidset a n-idi & a n-erchomail, allomna & allethrenna, go ro memaid de mnib & maccaemaib & mindoenib, midlaigib & meraigib fer n-hErend trisin dunud siar-dess.

At that time they were at the edge-feat of swords. It was then Ferdiad caught Cuchulain in an unguarded moment, and he gave him a thrust with his tusk-hilted blade, so that he buried it in his breast, and his blood fell into his belt, till the ford became crimsoned with the clotted blood from the battle-warrior's body. Cuchulain endured it not under Ferdiad's attack, with his death-bringing, heavy blows, and his long strokes and his mighty, middle slashes at him.
Batar sun ar faebarchless claideb risin r sin. Is and-sin ra sacht Fer diad uair baeguil and fecht far Coinculaind, & ra bert bim din chulg dt d, go ra folaig na chlab, go torchair a chr na chriss, corbh forruammanda in t-th do chr a chuirp in chathmiled. Ni faerlangair Cuchulaind an sein, a ra gab Fer diad bar a brthbalcbemmennaib & ftalbemmennaib & madalbemmennaib mra fair.

Then Cuchulain bethought him of his friends from the Faery land and of his mighty folk who would come to defend him and of his scholars to protect him, what time he would be hard pressed in the combat. It was then that Dolb and Indolb arrived to help and to succour their friend, namely Cuchulain. Then it was that Ferdiad felt the onset of the three together smiting his shield against him, and he gave all his care and attention thereto, and thence he called to mind that, when they were with Scathach and with Uathach [learning together, Dolb and Indolb used to come to help Cuchulain out of every stress wherein he was.]
Ro smuainestar Cuchulainn a sidhchairdi agus a cumachtaib do tocht da chosnamh agus a descibail d ditin, an tan badh airc d isin comlunn. Is ann sin do riacht Dolb & Indolb d'furtacht & d'foirithin a ccarat .i. Concculainn. Is ann sin do mothaig Fer diad tinsaitin an trr an aoinfeacht ac tuarcain a sceith fair, agus do rat da uidh agus da aire , agus as as ro fitir .i. an tan ro batar ic Scthaigh agus ic Uathaigh.

Ferdiad spake: "Not alike are our foster-brothership and our comradeship O Cuchulain," quoth he. "How so, then?" asked Cuchulain. "Thy friends of the Fairy-folk have succoured thee, and thou didst not disclose them to me before," said Ferdiad. "Not easy for me were that," answered Cuchulain; "for if the magic veil be once revealed to one of the sons of Mile, none of the Tuatha De Danann will have power to practise concealment or magic. And why complainest thou here, Ferdiad?" said Cuchulain. "Thou hast a horn skin whereby to multiply feats and deeds of arms on me, and thou hast not shown me how it is closed or how it is opened." Then it was they displayed all their skill and secret cunning to one another, so that there was not a secret of either of them kept from the other except the Gae Bulga, which was Cuchulain's.
Adubairt Fer diad: Ni cuttrama ar ccomaltus no ar ccompntus a Cuchulainn, ar s. Cidh esen itir, ar Cuchulainn. Do carait sdhchaire-si gut thathaigi & nior taispenais damsa riam iet, ar Fer diad. Ni fuil urusa damsa ann sin, ar Cuchulainn, uair d ttaisbentar in fth fiadha aoinfeacht do nech do macaibh Miledh, nocha bia gabail re diamair no re draideacht ic nech do Tuathaib De Danann, & cid tusa ann, ata congancnes agat d'iomarcadh cles agus gaisgidh toramsa, et nior taispenais damhsa a iadhadh no a foslaccadh, gurab ann sin do taispensit a n-uile gliocas agus derridacht da chle, conach raibhi diamair caic diob ag aroile acht mad in gae bulga ic Coinchulainn.

Howbeit, when the Fairy friends found Cuchulain had been wounded, each of them inflicted three great, heavy wounds on him, on Ferdiad, to wit. It was then that Ferdiad made a cast to the right, so that he slew Dolb with that goodly cast. Then followed the two woundings and the two throws that overcame him, till Ferdiad made a second throw towards Cuchulain's left, and with that throw he stretched low and killed Indolb dead on the floor of the ford. Hence it is that the story-teller sang the rann:

"Why is this called Ferdiad's Ford,
E'en though three men on it fell?
None the less it washed their spoils--
It is Dolb's and Indolb's Ford!" Cidh tra acht o fuaratar na sidhcairi Coinculainn arn chreachtnughudh, tugatar tri tromgona mora fair-siom o gach fer diob .i. for Fir n-diadh. Is ann sin do rat Fer diad ercar da dhes, gur marp Dolp don degerchar sin. Ro batar in da ghuin agus in da ercar ica forrach iersin, co d-tard Fer diad an dara hercar for cle Conculainn, cur trascar & cur tren-marbh Indolb ar lar an tha don ercur sin, gurab do sin ro chan an seanchaidh an rann:

Cret f n-abar Ath Fir diad
frisin ath gar thuit an triar.
Ni lugha rus nigh a fuidb
th Duilb agus th Induilb.
When the devoted equally great sires and champions, and the hard, battle-victorious wild beasts that fought for Cuchulain had fallen, it greatly strengthened the courage of Ferdiad, so that he gave two blows for every blow of Cuchulain's. When Laeg son of Riangabair saw his lord being overcome by the crushing blows of the champion who oppressed him, Laeg began to stir up and rebuke Cuchulain, in such a way that a swelling and an inflation filled Cuchulain from top to ground, as the wind fills a spread, open banner, so that he made a dreadful, wonderful bow of himself like a skybow in a shower of rain, and he made for Ferdiad with the violence of a dragon or the strength of a blood-hound.
Cidh tra acht o do roctatar na hetrecha caomha commora agus na beitrecha cruaidi cathbhuadacha batar iom Coinculainn, do nertaigh sin go mr menma Fir diad, go ttugadh da beim im gach m-bem do Coinculainn. Ot connairc Laogh mac Riangabra a tigherna aga traothadh do beimendaibh tuindsemacha in trenfir ro-das-timairc, ro gab Laogh ag griosadh agus ag glmadh Conculainn samlaidh, co ro lion att agus infisi Coinculainn amail linas gaoth onch bhl oslaicthi, go n-derna sduaigh n-uathbsaigh n-anaithnidh dhe amail sduaigh nimhi re frais fearthana, agus ro iondsaigh docum Fir diad mar dremne dreaccan no mar nert n-rcon.

And Cuchulain called for the Gae Bulga from Laeg son of Riangabair. This was its nature: With the stream it was made ready, and from between the fork of the foot it was cast; the wound of a single spear it gave when entering the body, and thirty barbs had it when it opened and it could not be drawn out of a man's flesh till the flesh had been cut about it.
Acus conattacht in n-gae m-bulga bar Laeg mac Riangabra. Is amlaid ra bi side, ra sruth ra indiltea & illadair ra teilgthea, lad oengae leis ac techt i n-duni & trchu farrindi ri taithmech, & ni gatta a curp duni go coscairthea immi.

Thereupon Laeg came forward to the brink of the river and to the place where the fresh water was dammed, and the Gae Bulga was sharpened and set in position. He filled the pool and stopped the stream and checked the tide of the ford. Ferdiad's charioteer watched the work, for Ferdiad had said to him early in the morning: "Now gilla, do thou hold back Laeg from me to-day, and I will hold back Cuchulain from thee." "This is a pity," quoth the henchman; "no match for him am I; for a man to combat a hundred is he, and that am I not. Still; however slight his help, it shall not come to his lord past me."
As annsin rainic Laogh roimhi go heochair-imlibh na habonn & co hionadh na forgabala ar in bh-fioruisgi agus geraighther agus in-dillter in gae bulga. Ro lion in lind agus ro fost in sruth agus ro coisc eascal in tha. Ro fechastar ara Fir diad in saothar sin, uair it bert Fer diad mochthrath ris: Maith a giolla, ar s, dingaib-si Logh dom-sa ani agus dingepat-sa Coinculainn dit-sa. Truag sin, ar in gilla, ni fer dingbala dh misi, uair is fer comlainn cet esiomh, agus nocha n-edh misi. Gidhedh chena nocha ria a beag da congnam-somh g thigerna tarorsa.

He was then watching his brother thus making the dam till he filled the pools and went to set the Gae Bulga downwards. It was then that Id went up and released the stream and opened the dam and undid the fixing of the Gae Bulga. Cuchulain became deep purple and red all over when he saw the setting undone on the Gae Bulga. He sprang from the top of the ground so that he alighted light and quick on the rim of Ferdiad's shield. Ferdiad gave a strong shake to the shield, so that he hurled Cuchulain the measure of nine paces out to the westward over the ford.
Boi-siomh in trth sin ic fechadh a bhrthar no, gur linastair na linti agus go n-dechaidh d'indioll an gae bulga sos. As ann sin do choidh Idh sus, agus do sgaoil ar in sruth agus ro fosgail an forgabail agus do leg indioll an gae builg. Do ruamhnaigedh agus do roderccadh iom Coinculainn, t connairc a indioll ar n-dul n gae bulga. Ro lingestair do maoilind talman, go raibhi ar bile sgeith Fir diad go hurettrom athlamh. Do rat Fer diad crothadh ar in sgeith, gur thelg Coinculainn modh noi cceimenn tar in th sar sechtair.

Then Cuchulain called and shouted to Laeg to set about preparing the Gae Bulga for him. Laeg hastened to the pool and began the work. Id ran and opened the dam and released it before the stream. Laeg sprang at his brother and they grappled on the spot. Laeg threw Id and handled him sorely, for he was loath to use weapons upon him. Ferdiad pursued Cuchulain westwards over the ford. Cuchulain sprang on the rim of the shield. Ferdiad shook the shield, so that he sent Cuchulain the space of nine paces eastwards over the ford.
Is ann sin garthais agus grchais Cuchulainn ar Laogh ag gabail laimhe fair iman gae bulga d'innioll d. Reathais Laogh gus an linn agus rus gabh fuirre. Rethais Idh agus ro foslaic riasan sruth, agus ro sgail in cora. Scindis Laogh g bhrthair, & ro comruicsit ar in lathair sin. Leagais Laogh Idh, agns easonoraighis co mor , ir nior bh'il les airm d'imbirt fair. Lenais Fer diad Coinculainn tar th siar. Linccis Cuchulainn tar bile in sgeth. Crothais Fer diad in sgiath, gur cuir Coinculain mod noi cemend tar th soir.

Cuchulain called and shouted to Laeg. Laeg attempted to come, but Ferdiad's charioteer let him not, so that Laeg turned on him and left him on the sedgy bottom of the ford. He gave him many a heavy blow with clenched fist on the face and countenance, so that he broke his mouth and his nose and put out his eyes and his sight. And forthwith Laeg left him and filled the pool and checked the stream and stilled the noise of the river's voice, and set in position the Gae Bulga. After some time Ferdiad's charioteer arose from his death-cloud, and set his hand on his face and countenance, and he looked away towards the ford of combat and saw Laeg fixing the Gae Bulga. He ran again to the pool and made a breach in the dike quickly and speedily, so that the river burst out in its booming, bounding, bellying, bank-breaking billows making its own wild course. Cuchulain became purple and red all over when he saw the setting of the Gae Bulga had been disturbed, and for the third time he sprang from the top of the ground and alighted on the edge of Ferdiad's shield, so as to strike him over the shield from above. Ferdiad gave a blow with his left knee against the leather of the bare shield, so that Cuchulain was thrown into the waves of the ford.
Garthais agus grechais Cuchulainn ar Laogh. Fabrais Laogh a iondsaighe agus nior leic ara Fir diad dh cur ro iompdh fris agus cur ro leacc for osarlar an tha. Toirbiris moeldorna mora mionea tar a gnis agus tar a aghaidh, cur bris a bl agus a srn, agus cur saobh a rosc agus a radharc, agus toed uadha asa haithle agus ro lon an lind agus ro fost an sruth agus ro choisc glorgrith na habond agus ro indill an gae bulga. arsin ergis ara Fir diad asa thaimhnll agus tuc lamh tar a gnis agus tar a aghaidh, agus ro fch adha ar th in comlainn agus it connairc Laogh [uadha] ag indell an gae builg. Rethais iaromh cus in lind, cur ro bearn an cloidhe co tric tinnesnach, cur meabaidh don abhainn ina buindeadhaibh borbghloracha bedccarda bangdlithi bruachbristeacha ar amus a baoithreme bunaidh. Do raimnigedh agus do rodherccadh iom Coinculainn, ot condairc a indell ar n-dul n gae bulga, cur lingeastar do maoilinn talman an tres feact co raibhi ar bile sceth Fir diad dia bualadh tar in sgieth anas. Do rat Fer diad buille d gln cl i leathair an loimscth go ttarla Cuchulainn fo lintip an atha.

Thereupon Ferdiad gave three severe woundings to Cuchulain. Cuchulain cried and shouted loudly to Laeg to make ready the Gae Bulga for him. Laeg attempted to get near it, but Ferdiad's charioteer prevented him. Then Laeg grew very wroth at his brother and he made a spring at him, and he closed his long, full-valiant hands over him, so that he quickly threw him to the ground and straightway bound him. And then he went from him quickly and courageously, so that he filled the pool and stayed the stream and set the Gae Bulga. And he cried out to Cuchulain that it was served, for it was not to be discharged without a quick word of warning before it. Hence it is that Laeg cried out:--

"Ware! beware the Gae Bulga,
Battle-winning Culann's hound!" [et reliqua] Is ann sin do rat Fer diad teora tromghonta for Coinculainn. Garthais agus grchais Cuchulainn ar Laogh ag gabail lama fair iman gae bulga do inneall d. Fuabrais Laogh a iondsaighe, agus nir lcc ara Fir diad d. Ferccaigther Laogh fris ann sin agus beris sidhe da iondsaighe agus iadhais a lamha leabra langasda tairis, gur ro trascar co athlamh agus ro trascar fo cetir. Agus taot uadha co solamh sarcalma, cur ro lon an lind agus ro fost in sruth agus ro indill in gae bulga, agus ro fuaccar do Coinculainn a frithoileamh, uair ni tabhartha gan recne rabaid roimi, conadh aire sin atbert Laogh:

Fomhna fomhna an gae bulga
a Cuchulainn cathbhadaigh & rl.
Then it was that Cuchulain let fly the white Gae Bulga from the fork of his irresistible right foot. Ferdiad prepared for the feat according to the testimony thereof. He lowered his shield, so that the spear went over its edge into the watery, water-cold river. And he looked at Cuchulain, and he saw all his various, venomous feats made ready, and he knew not to which of them he should first give answer, whether to the 'Fist's breast-spear,' or to the 'Wild shield's broad-spear,' or to the 'Short spear from the middle of the palm,' or to the white Gae Bulga over the fair, watery river.
Is ann sin ro frithoileastar Cuchulainn an bangae bulca tre ladhair a choisi dghraisi deisi. Frithilis Fer diad in cles do rer a testa. Do rat in sgiath sios, co tainic tar bile in sgeith isin sruth linnide liondfhar. Agus sillis ar Coinculainn agus at connairc a ilcleasa neme uile ar indell aicci, agus ni raibhi a fios aige, cia dhobh dho frecceoradh ar tus, ane in cliabgae glaici n in an leathangae loindsgth no an certgae do lar a bhoisi no an an bangae bulga tresan sruth n-alainn n-uiseidhi.

Ferdiad heard the Gae Bulga called for. He thrust his shield down to protect the lower part of his body. Cuchulain gripped the short spear, cast it off the palm of his hand over the rim of the shield and over the edge of the corselet and horn-skin, so that its farther half was visible after piercing his heart in his bosom. Ferdiad gave a thrust of his shield upwards to protect the upper part of his body, though it was help that came too late. The gilla set the Gae Bulga down the stream, and Cuchulain caught it in the fork of his foot, and threw the Gae Bulga as far as he could cast underneath at Ferdiad, so that it passed through the strong, thick, iron apron of wrought iron, and broke in three parts the huge, goodly stone the size of a millstone, so that it cut its way through the body's protection into him, till every joint and every limb was filled with its barbs.
Acus atchuala Fer diad in n-gae m-bolga d'imrd. Ra bert bim din scath ss d'anacul chtair a chuirp. Boruaraid Cuchulaind in certgae, delgthi do lr a dernainni dar bil in sceth & dar brollach in chonganchnis, gor bo ren in leth n-alltarach de ar tregtad a chride na chlab. Ra bert Fer diad bim din scath sas d'anacul uactair a chuirp, giarb in chobair iar n-assu. Da indill in gilla in n-gae m-bolga risin sruth, & ra rithil Cuchulaind illadair a chossi & tarlaic rout n-urchoir de bar Fer nh-diad, co n-dechaid trisin fuathbhric n-imdanhgin n-imdomain n-iarnaide do iurn athlegtha, gorrebris in muadchloich mir miti clochi mulind i tr, co n-dechaid dar timthirecht a chuirp and, gor bho ln cach n-alt & cach n-ge de, d forrindib.

"Ah, that now sufficeth," sighed Ferdiad: "I am fallen of that! But, yet one thing more: mightily didst thou drive with thy right foot. And 'twas not fair of thee for me to fall by thy hand." And he yet spake and uttered these words:
Leor sain bhadesta ale, bar Fer diad, darochar-sa de sein. Acht at n chena, is t(r)n unnsi as do deiss, acus nr bo chir dait mo thuttimsea dot lim. Is amlaid ra bi ga rd & ra bert na briathra:

"O Cu of grand feats,
Unfairly I'm slain!
Thy guilt clings to me;
My blood falls on thee!
"No meed for the wretch
Who treads treason's gap.
Now weak is my voice;
Ah, gone is my bloom!

"My ribs' armour bursts,
My heart is all gore;
I battled not well;
I'm smitten, O Cu!
A Ch na cless cain,
nr dess dait mo guin,
lett in locht rom len,
is fort ra fer mh'fuil.
Ni lossat na troich
recait bernaid m-braith,
as galar mo guth,
uch doscarad scaith.

Mebait mh'asnae fuidb,
mo chride-se is cr,
nimath d'ferus bag,
darochar a Ch.

Thereupon Cuchulain hastened towards Ferdiad and clasped his two arms about him, and bore him with all his arms and his armour and his dress northwards over the ford, that so it should be with his face to the north of the ford the triumph took place and not to the south of the ford with the men of Erin. Cuchulain laid Ferdiad there on the ground, and a cloud and a faint and a swoon came over Cuchulain there by the head of Ferdiad. Laeg espied it, and the men of Erin all arose for the attack upon him. "Come, O Cucuc," cried Laeg; "arise now from thy trance, for the men of Erin will come to attack us, and it is not single combat they will allow us, now that Ferdiad son of Daman son of Dar is fallen by thee." "What availeth it me to arise, O gilla," moaned Cuchulain, "now that this one is fallen by my hand?" In this wise the gilla spake and he uttered these words and Cuchulain responded:
Ra bert Cuchulaind sidi da saigid assa aithle & ra iad a da lim tharis & tuargaib leiss cona arm & cona erriud & cona tgud dar th fa thuaid , go m-bad ra th a tuid ra beth in coscur & na bad ra th anar ac feraib hErend. Dalec Cuchulaind ar lr Fer n-diad and & darochair nl & tam & tassi bar Coinculaind as chind Fir diad and. Atchonnaic Leg ansin, acus atrigestar fir hErend uile do thichtain d saigid. Maith a Chucuc, bar Lag, comerig bhadesta & daroisset fir hErend dar saigid & ni ba cumland oenfir dmait dinn, a darochair Fer diad mac Damain meic Dare latsu. Can dam-sa irgi, a gillai, bar -sium, & int darochair limm. Is amlaid ra bi in gilla ga rd & ra bert na briathra and & ra recair Cuchulaind:

Laeg: "Now arise, O Emain's Hound;
Now most fits thee courage high.
Ferdiad hast thou thrown-- of hosts--
God's fate! How thy fight was hard!"
Cuchulain: What avails me courage now?
I'm oppressed with rage and grief,
For the deed that I have don
On his body sworded sore!"

Laeg: It becomes thee not to weep;
Fitter for thee to exult!
Yon red-speared one thee hath left
Plaintful, wounded, steeped in gore!"

Cuchulain: "Even had he cleaved my leg,
And one hand had severed too;
Woe, that Ferdiad-- who rode steeds--
Shall not ever be in life!"

Laeg: "Liefer far what's come to pass,
To the maidens of Red Branch;
He to die, thou to remain;
They grudge not that ye should part!"

Cuchulain: "From the day I Cualnge left,
Seeking high and splendid Medb,
Carnage has she had-- with fame--
Of her warriors whom I've slain!"

Laeg: "Thou hast had no sleep in peace,
In pursuit of thy great Tin;
Though thy troop was few and small,
Oft thou wouldst rise at early morn!"
Erig a rchu Emna,
cru a chach duit mormenma,
ra lis dt Fer n-diad na n-drong,
debrad is cruaid do chomlond.
Ga chana dam menma mr,
ram immart baeis acus brn
ithle inn echta doringnius
issin chuirp ra chruadchlaidbius.

Ni ra chir dait a chaniud,
coru dait a chommaidium,
rat rcaib in radrinnech
cintech crechtach crolindech.

Da m-benad mo lethchoiss slin
dm is cor benad mo lethlim,
trug nach Fer diad bi ar echaib
tri bithu na bithbethaid.

Ferr leo-som na n-dernad de
ra ingenaib Craebruade,
sessium d'c tussu dh'anad,
leo n bec bar m-bithscarad.

n l thanac a Cualnge
i n-diaid Medba mrglare,
is ar dain le co m-blaid
ra marbais da miledaib.

Ni ra chotlais issma
i n-degaid da mrthana,
giar b'uathed do dm malle,
mr maitne ba moch th'eirge.

Cuchulain began to lament and bemoan Ferdiad, and he spake the words:

"Alas, O Ferdiad," spake he, "'twas thine ill fortune thou didst not take counsel with any of those that knew my real deeds of valour and arms, before we met in clash of battle! Unhappy for thee that Laeg son of Riangabair did not make thee blush in regard to our comradeship! Unhappy for thee that the truly faithful warning of Fergus thou didst not take! Unhappy for thee that dear, trophied, triumphant, battle-victorious Conall counselled thee not in regard to our comradeship! For those men would not have spoken in obedience to the messages or desires or orders or false words of promise of the fair-haired women of Connacht. For well do those men know that there will not be born a being that will perform deeds so tremendous and so great among the Connachtmen as I, till the very day of doom and of everlasting life, whether at plying of spear and sword, at playing at draughts and chess, at driving of steeds and chariots."
Ra gab Cuchulaind ac cine & ac airchisecht Fir diad and & ra bert na briathra:

Maith, a Fir diad, b dursan dait nach nech dind fiallaig ra fitir mo chertgnmrada-sa gaile & gascid ra acallais re comriactain din comrac n-immairic. Ba dirsan dait nach Laeg mac Riangabra ramnastar comairle ar comaltais. Ba dirsan duit nch athesc frglan Fergusa foremais. Ba dirsan duit nach Conall caem coscarach commidmech cathbuadach cobrastar comairle ar comaltais. Dag ra fetatar in fir sin, na gigne gein gabas gnimrada cutrumma commra Connachtaig (?) rut-sa go brunni m-brtha & betha. Dag ni adiartis ind fir sein de fessaib na dlib na dlaib n briathraib brec-ingill ban cendfind Connacht. eter imbeirt scell & scath, eter imbeirt gae & chlaideb, eter imbeirt m-brandub & fidchell, eter imbeirt ech & charpat.

"There shall not be found the hand of a hero that will wound warrior's flesh, like cloud-coloured Ferdiad! There shall not be heard from the gap the cry of red-mouthed Badb to the winged, shade-speckled flocks! There shall not be one that will contend for Cruachan that will obtain covenants equal to thine, till the very day of doom and of life henceforward, O red-cheeked son of Daman!" said Cuchulain. Then it was that Cuchulain arose and stood over Ferdiad: "Ah, Ferdiad," spake Cuchulain, "greatly have the men of Erin deceived and abandoned thee, to bring thee to contend and do battle with me. For no easy thing is it to contend and do battle with me on the Raid for the Kine of Cualnge! Thus he spake, and he uttered these words:
N bha lam laich lethas crna caurad mar Fer n-diad n n-datha. N bha buriud berna baidbhi belderg do scoraib sciathcha scthbricci. Ni bha Cruachain cossenas, gebas curu cutrumma rut-su, go brunni m-bratha & bhetha badesta, a meic drechdeirg Damin, bar Cuchulaind. Is and-sin ra erig Cuchulaind as chind Fir diad. Maith a Fir diad, bar Cuchulaind, is mr in brth & in trecun dabertatar fir hErend fort do thabairt do chomlund & do chomruc rim-sa, dig ni rid comlund na comrac rim-sa bar tain bo Cualnhge. Is amlaid ra bi g rd & rabert na briathra:

"Ah, Ferdiad, betrayed to death.
Our last meeting, oh, how sad!
Thou to die I to remain.
Ever sad our long farewell!
"When we over yonder dwelt
With our Scathach, steadfast, true,
This we thought till end of time,
That our friendship ne'er would end!

"Dear to me thy noble blush;
Dear thy comely, perfect form;
Dear thine eye, blue-grey and clear;
Dear thy wisdom and thy speech!

"Never strode to rending fight,
Never wrath and manhood held,
Nor slung shield across broad back,
One like thee, Daman's red son!

Never have I met till now,
Since I Oenfer Aif slew,
One thy peer in deeds of arms,
Never have I found, Ferdiad!

Finnabair, Medb's daughter fair,
Beauteous, lovely though she be,
As a gad round sand or stones,
She was shown to thee, Ferdiad!"
A Fir diad ar dot chle brath,
dursan do dl dedenach,
tussu d'c missi d'anad,
sirdursan ar srscarad.
Mad dammamar alla anall
ac Scthaig Bhuadaig Bhuanand,
dar lind go bruthe bras
nocho biad ar n-athchardes.

Inmain lemm do ruidiud rn,
inmain do chruth caem comln,
inmain do rosc glass glanba (no gregda),
inmain t'laig (no t'lle) is t'irlabra.

Nr ching din tress tinbhi chness,
nir gab feirg ra ferachas,
ni ra chongaib scath as leirg lin
th'aidgin-siu a meic deirg Damain.

Ni tharla rumm sund cose,
a bhacear Oenfer Aife,
da mac samla galaib gliad,
ni fuarus sund a Fir diad.

Findabair ingea Medba,
g beith d'febas a delba,
is gat im ganem n im gran
a taidbsiu duit-siu a Fir diad.

Then Cuchulain turned to gaze on Ferdiad. "Ah, my master Laeg," cried Cuchulain, "now strip Ferdiad and take his armour and garments off him, that I may see the brooch for the sake of which he entered on the combat and fight with me." Laeg came up and stripped Ferdiad. He took his armour and garments off him and he saw the brooch and he began to lament and complain over Ferdiad, and he spake these words:
Ra gab Cuchulaind ac fegad Fir diad and. Maith a mo phopa Laig, bar Cuchulaind, fadbaig Fer n-diad bhadesta, & ben a erriud & a tgud de, go faccur-sa in delg ara n-derna in comlund & in comrac. Tanic Laeg & ra fadbaig Fer n-diad. Ra ben a erriud & a tgud de, & ra chonnaic in delg, & ra gab ga caine & ga airchisecht & ra bert na briathra:

"Alas, golden brooch;
Ferdiad of the hosts,
O good smiter, strong,
Victorious thy hand!
"Thy hair blond and curled,
A wealth fair and grand.
Thy soft, leaf-shaped belt
Around thee till death!

"Our comradeship dear;
Thy noble eye's gleam;
Thy golden-rimmed shield;
Thy sword, treasures worth!

"Thy white-silver torque
Thy noble arm binds.
Thy chess-board worth wealth;
Thy fair, ruddy cheek!

"To fall by my hand,
I own was not just!
'Twas no noble fight.
Alas, golden brooch!
Dursan a eo oir,
a Fir diad aam (?),
a bailcbemnig chain,
b buadach do lam.
Do barr buide chas,
ba bras ba cain set,
do cris duillech maeth,
no bith imod thoeb.

Ar comaltus coem,
a airer nasul [sic],
do sciath co m-bil oir,
do cloidem ba coem.

T'ornasc arcait bain
immo do laim soir,
t'fhithchell ba fiu moir [sic],
do gruadh corcra choin.

Do thuittim dom lim,
tucim narb chir,
nir bha chomsund chin,
dursan a e ir.

"Come, O Laeg my master," cried Cuchulain; "now cut open Ferdiad and take the Gae Bulga out, because I may not be without my weapons." Laeg came and cut open Ferdiad and he took the Gae Bulga out of him. And Cuchulain saw his weapons bloody and red-stained by the side of Ferdiad, and he uttered these words:--
Maith a mo phopa Lag, bar Cuchulaind, coscair Fer n-diad fadesta & ben in n-gae m-bolga ass, dag ni fetaim-se beith i n-cmais m'airm. Tanic Laeg, & ra choscair Fer n-diad acus ra ben in n-gae m-bolga ass. Acus ra chonnaic-sium a arm fuilech forderg ra taeb Fir diad & ra bert na briathra:

"O Ferdiad, in gloom we meet.
Thee I see both red and pale.
I myself with unwashed arms;
Thou liest in thy bed of gore!
"Were we yonder in the East,
Scathach and our Uathach near,
There would not be pallid lips
Twixt us two, and arms of strife!

"Thus spake Scathach trenchantly (?),
Words of warning, strong and stern.
'Go ye all to furious fight;
German, blue-eyed, fierce will come!'

"Unto Ferdiad then I spake,
And to Lugaid generous,
To the son of fair Baetan,
German we would go to meet!

"We came to the battle-rock,
Over Lake Linn Formait's shore.
And four hundred men we brought
From the Isles of the Athissech!

"As I stood and Ferdiad brave
At the gate of German's fort,
I slew Rinn the son of Nel;
He slew Ruad son of Fornel!

Ferdiad slew upon the slope
Blath, of Colba 'Red-sword' son.
Lugaid, fierce and swift, then slew
Mugairne of the Tyrrhene Sea!

"I slew, after going in,
Four times fifty grim, wild men.
Ferdiad killed-- a furious horde--
Dam Dremenn and Dam Dilenn!

"We laid waste shrewd German's fort
O'er the broad, bespangled sea.
German we brought home alive
To our Scathach of broad shield!

"Then our famous nurse made fast
Our blood-pact of amity,
That our angers should not rise
'Mongst the tribes of noble Elg!

"Sad the morn, a day in March,
Which struck down weak Daman's son.
Woe is me, the friend is fall'n
Whom I pledged in red blood's draught!

"Were it there I saw thy death,
Midst the great Greeks' warrior-bands,
I'd not live on after thee,
But together we would die!

"Woe, what us befel therefrom,
Us, dear Scathach's fosterlings,
Me sore wounded, red with blood,
Thee no more to drive thy car!

"Woe, what us befel therefrom,
Us, dear Scathach's fosterlings,
Me sore wounded, stiff with gore,
Thee to die the death for aye!

"Woe, what us befel therefrom,
Us, dear Scathach's fosterlings,
Thee in death, me, strong, alive.
Valour is an angry strife!"
A Fir diad is truag in dl,
t'acsin dam go ruad robn,
missi gan m'arm do nigi,
tussu it chossair chroligi.
Md dammamar all anair
ac Scathaig is ac Uathaig,
nocho betis beil bna
etraind is airm ilga.

Atubairt Scthach go scenb
a athesc ruanaid roderb:
Ergid uli don chath chass,
bar-ficfa German Garbglass.

Atubart-sa ra Fer n-diad
acus ra Lugaid lnfal
acus ra mac m-Baetain m-bin
techt dn i n-agid Germa(i)n.

Lodmar go haille in chomraic
s leirg Locha Lind Formait,
tucsam chethri cht immach
a indsib na n-athissech.

Da m-ba-sa is Fer diad inn ig
i n-dorus dne Germain,
ro marbusa Rind mae Nuil,
ro marb-som Ruad mac Fornuil.

Ra marb Fer baeth ar in leirg
Blth mac Colbai chlaidebdeirg,
ro marb Lugaid fer duairc dan
Mugairne mara Torrian.

Ra marbusa ar n-dula innund
cethri choicait frn ferglond,
ro marb Fer diad, duairc in drem,
Dam n-dreimed is Dam n-dilend.

Ra airgsem dn n-Germin n-glicc
s fargi lethan lindbricc,
tucsam Germn i m-bethaid
lind go Scthaig sciathlethain.

Da naisc ar mummi go m-blad
ar cr cotaig is entad,
conna betis ar ferga
eter fini find-Elga.

Trug in maten maten mirt,
ros b mac Damin dithraicht,
uchan dochara in cara
dara dalius dig n-dergfala.

Da m-bad and atcheind-sea th'c
eter miledaib mr-Grc,
n beind-se i m-bethaid dar th'eis,
go m-bad aroen atbhilmeis.

Is trag an narta de
nar n-daltanaib Scathche,
missi crechtach bha chru rad,
tussu gan charptiu d'imlud.

Is trag an narta de
nar n-daltanaib Scthaiche,
missi crechtach bha chr garb
acus tussu ulimarb.

Is truag an narta de
nar n-daltanaib Scathaige,
tussu dh'c, missi be brass,
is gleo ferge in ferachas.

"Good, O Cucuc," spake Laeg, "let us leave this ford now; too long are we here!" "Aye, let us leave it, O my master Laeg," replied Cuchulain. "But every combat and battle I have fought seems a game and a sport to me compared with the combat and battle of Ferdiad." Thus he spake, and he uttered these words:
Maith a Chucuc, bar Laeg, fcbam in n-th sa fadesta. Is rofata atm and. Faicfimmt m cin, a mo phopa Lig, bar Cuchulaind. Acht is cluchi & is gini lem-sa cach comlond & cach comrac darnus i farrad chomlaind & comraic Fir diad. Acus is amlaid ra bi ga rd & rabert na briathra:

All was play, all was sport,
Till came Ferdiad to the ford!
One task for both of us,
Equal our reward.
Our kind, gentle nurse
Chose him over all!
All was play, all was sport,
Till came Ferdiad to the ford!
One our life, one our fear,
One our skill in arms.
Shields gave Scathach twain
To Ferdiad and me!

All was play, all was sport,
Till came Ferdiad to the ford!
Dear the shaft of gold
I smote on the ford.
Bull-chief of the tribes,
Braver he than all!

Only games and only sport,
Till came Ferdiad to the ford!
Lion furious, flaming, fierce;
Swollen wave that wrecks like doom!

Only games and only sport,
Till came Ferdiad to the ford!
Loved Ferdiad seemed to me
After me would live for aye!
Yesterday, a mountain's size--
He is but a shade to-day!

Three things countless on the Tin
Which have fallen by my hand:
Hosts of cattle, men and steeds
I have slaughtered on all sides!

Though the hosts were e'er so great,
That came out of Cruachan wild,
More than third and less than half,
Slew I in my direful sport!

Never trod in battle's ring;
Banba nursed not on her breast;
Never sprang from sea or land,
King's son that had larger fame!"
Cluchi cach gine cach
go roich Fer[n]diad issin n-th.
Inund foglaim frth dinn,
innund rograim rth,
inund mummi maeth,
ras slainni sech cch.
Cluchi cach gaine cach
go roich Fer diad issin n-ath.
Inund aisti aruth dinn,
inund gasced gnath.
Scathach tuc da sciath
dam-sa is Fer diad trth.

Cluchi cach gaine cach
go roich Fer diad issin n-th.
Inmain uatni ir
ra furmius ar th,
a tarbga na tuath
ba calma na cch.

Cluchi cach gaine cach
go roich Fer diad issin n-th,
in leoman lassamain lond,
in tond baeth bhorr immar brath.

Cluchi cach gaine cach
go roich Fer diad issin n-th.
Indar lim-sa Fer dil diad
is am diaid ra biad go brath.
Ind ba metithir sliab,
indiu n fuil de acht a scath.

Tri drme na tana
darochratar dom lama,
formna b fer acus ech,
ro-da-slaidius ar cach leth.

Gir bat linmara na sluaig
tancatar a Chruachain chruaid,
mo trn is lugu lethi
ro marbus dom garbchluchi.

Nocho tarla co cath cr,
n ra alt Banba da br,
nir rachind de muir na thir
de maccaib rg bhud ferr cl.

Thus far the Death of Ferdiad.
Aided Fir diad gonnici sin


Gir bat linmara na sluaig
tancatar a Chruachain chruaid,
mo trn is lugu lethi
ro marbus dom garbchluchi.

Nocho tarla co cath cr,
n ra alt Banba da br,
nir rachind de muir na thir
de maccaib rg bhud ferr cl.

Thus far the Death of Ferdiad.
Aided Fir diad gonnici sin