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Thread: Villages Can Solve Our Social Problems

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    Villages Can Solve Our Social Problems

    The welfare state isn’t working. We are approaching social breakdown. Young people are running out of control. Our people are living out their last years totally alone and vulnerable. Orphanages are now known to be honey pots to paedophiles. Old peoples’ homes, I know from personal experience, can be just as cruel. The incompetent, the inadequate and the just plain mad are thrown onto the streets with occasional help from burnt-out carers. We know you can’t buy love. Well, you can’t buy care either.

    It is becoming clear that the State can never provide the care that it claims. Because of its high taxation, labour costs are high. In a welfare state caring has to be paid for. The State can never afford to pay for the care that the extended family used to provide, free.

    The breakdown of the extended family and now the nuclear family means that control of the young has disappeared. Bad behaviour used to reflect on the whole extended family, so there was considerable pressure on children to behave. Grandparents would wield the strongest but tolerant influence, particularly grandmothers. It is the female in rearing the children who sets the standards of behaviour. And the oldest have the most moral authority. ‘Matriarch’ is the wrong term, meaning a woman who rules. It is not power she has but influence.

    The extended family is able to ease marital difficulties. If a man is beating his wife, the wife’s father and brothers will come steaming down and put heavy pressure on him to stop. Nowadays fathers and brothers are miles away. If a child is being raised by inadequate parents, it will be gently moved up the road to aunts, cousins or grandparents, not into ‘care’.

    The extended family has vanished because of Mobility of Labour. Once the crops were sold out of the village, they were no longer able to provide jobs within the village. Workers with no land had to move to the cities where the crops had been taken to (because of the higher cost of living and therefore higher wages, the core can always out-bid the villages for the crops, as we out-bid the Third World for its crops).

    Another cause of the breakdown of the extended family is the State itself. In attempting to provide welfare it undermines the influence of the extended family. Family pressure can sometimes be irksome. Knowing that the State will provide anonymous welfare, pensions etc., the individualist may opt for State care, but this weakens family pressure to behave.

    To rebuild a caring society we have to rebuild the extended family. But this is not possible in towns and cities. Continual rebuilding caused by growing population and changing land values, destroys any geographical concentration of families. A famous study of London’s Bethnal Green showed how the last groups of extended families were dispersed by re-housing.

    So it is only the villages where we can re-build the extended families and a caring society. To do this we have to cut the population, cut taxation, cut the size of the political unit and cut free trade.

    The first thing to do is to provide jobs in villages, to replace machinery with people on the farms. This means reducing labour costs, the reason the machines replaced the people. High labour costs are caused by high taxation. So to provide jobs in the villages we have to cut the taxation on trade and traders, indirect taxation, which will directly reduce the cost of living (the taxes on trade are passed directly on to the consumer, an extra penny on a pint) so wages can be reduced, maintaining buying power, so that people can be cheaper to hire than expensive machines.

    Cutting the cost of living will enable craft-based industries like pottery and weaving to return to the villages because the craftsmen will not have to make such a large turnover to make a living.

    Ultimately, what provides jobs is the food grown in the villages. So the less food sold out of the village the more jobs. When the cost of living has gone down, the smallholder would be able to make a living selling his produce locally.

    On the periphery in the hills of Scotland, Wales and northern England, where they can be self-sufficient because of their low population, they can use taxes on imported goods from the core to protect their local craftsmen, or less formally use community pressure not to buy imported goods to protect their own family’s craftsmen.

    To bring final control back to the village we have to progressively break up the political unit, first to England, Ulster, Scotland and Wales, then to the regions with their own coinage and Final Appeal, then the counties, the towns and finally autonomous, self-sufficient armed villages.

    But this can only be achieved when we’ve cut the population. And when we’ve cut the population sufficiently no one will need jobs. We’ll all have our own plot of land.

    And when we’ve got our own plot of land there’ll be no television because there will be no one prepared to work in a television factory taking orders from a foreman, when we can be our own boss on our own land. There’ll be no computers or telephones, not because we won’t want them, but because we won’t be able to get the buggers into factories to make them. If we want to communicate, it’s back to fire signals.

    The loss of technology is the price we pay for a just and caring society.



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    Lík börn leika best.

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    I don't know if I agree with this person. Basicly this vision is that of J.R.R Tolkien, the deconstruction of industrial society and the replacment of the same with an more locally based economy.It is a romantic idea,appealing, shure,but realistic? Even if moral and famillyvalues in general were more desireable before the industrial revolution and the following shifting of the majority of people from the countryside to the cities, how can one be shure everything would go back the way it was? Imagine what a enormous shock for modern citydwellers this very changed lifestyle would be.I have seen what hard work on the countryside can do to an unprepared person with the citydweller set of mind,it was a deppressing sight,they don't handle it very well.Also, there were extended families that endured for a good while after the migration to the cities and there still is, the decomposure of the extended familly and moral started after all that. Although I agree that there is a connection between the general moral collapse of Western society and the industrial revolution it is the method of countering that I have my thoughts about.There nearly always has been public care for the needing, already in the dark ages there were houses for homeless,back then it was the church that orchestred the care for homeless and sick for the most, so in spite of the good situation of the extended familly back then,there still was homeless children and bums and so on. We tend to often forget,I do so to, the misery pre-modern society people often lived in. Famine,diseases and bodies worn out with hard labour. Although it's still preferable to the nemesis of the nordish people we have at hand it might not be the best way out.

    I guess I'd say that the vision of that scriber is simplistic,it might have some points but it's rather far-fetched and maybee not so realistic. I say the restoration of familly loyalty and moral lies in the minds of modern man,not in the geographic whereabouts.

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    The solution will me a mix of high-tech and ‘green’ technology, in smaller sustainable communities. If we do not try to establish harmony with our environment we are on the road to nowhere.

    There is no going back in one sense; now that the genie is out of the bottle. Nukes and other high-tech weapons and computer systems will have to remain in place - the stakes are too high now, but a social re-structuring would bring many benefits.

    It’s a case of accepting that our modern consumer society has disempowered our folk and detached us from any notion of involvement in society. The apathy that this generates permits mass immigration, race-mixing and the pollution of our soil.
    A people which takes no pride in the noble achievements of remote ancestors
    will never achieve anything worthy to be remembered with pride by remote descendents.

    Lord Macauley

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    i agree that a return to a more clan-ish mentality, and lifestyle, would be ideal for germanic peoples.
    "Nobody is more inferior than those who insist on being equal."
    - Friedrich Nietzsche

    "It is always more difficult to fight against faith than against knowledge"
    - An Austrian Painter

    "To dare is to lose one's footing momentarily. Not to dare is to lose oneself." - Søren Kierkegaard

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    Yep, let's get rid of our hardfought progress and go and live in grass huts like the ethnics. Who knows, maybe we can manage to scramble back up into the trees within a couple of generations?

    Community and clannishness is not incompatible with an urban environment. Worked just fine for hundreds of years in my neighbourhood.

    Can't believe that Nordish people actually want to live like Africans. Our ancerstors would have jumped at the chance of escaping their 'nasty, brutish and short' world. Don't ever kid yourselves about that.

    Of course, if people want to live in a rural environment, then they have the possibility of doing so. It is a simply matter of conviction.
    "If you are going to tell people the truth, you'd better make them laugh. Otherwise they'll kill you."

    - George Bernard Shaw

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    The welfare state isn’t working. We are approaching social breakdown. Young people are running out of control. Our people are living out their last years totally alone and vulnerable. Orphanages are now known to be honey pots to paedophiles. Old peoples’ homes, I know from personal experience, can be just as cruel. The incompetent, the inadequate and the just plain mad are thrown onto the streets with occasional help from burnt-out carers. We know you can’t buy love. Well, you can’t buy care either.
    Another cause of the breakdown of the extended family is the State itself. In attempting to provide welfare it undermines the influence of the extended family. Family pressure can sometimes be irksome. Knowing that the State will provide anonymous welfare, pensions etc., the individualist may opt for State care, but this weakens family pressure to behave.
    I agree totally with this... Europeans and their descendents here have had a love affair with big-government for far too long.

    Socialism, an idea that seemed so good to Bismarck, is going to be our downfall. I would argue that socialism has done more to get us in our current position than the industrial revolution.

    Most of the racial nonsense that happens out there in the world is forced on us by government. Sure the business world might have something to do with it, but with using Ford as an example, we can see that big-business can be connected to nationalistic feelings. Ford bent down before government pressure, and I think that is a microcosm of the story of big business in America and the world regarding multiculturalism.

    It is the government that has been the hammer that has been used to destroy our family units, our communities, and ultimately our race. I don't have much time for people who only want to blame business. I also don't like their marxist distrust of free enterprise.

    For us to regain control of our communities we need to insist on smaller governments and help incubate this idea of the government as the enemy.

    Almost all the calls for intergration, affirmitive action, abortion, ect... came to us from the federal level, the majority of it through the Supreme Court because they knew they would never get Brown versus The Board of Education through any legislature in America in 1950. To me the biggest watershed moments in the history of race in America, and the rest of the world since the rest of the world seems to follow america where ever liberalism is concerned, is Brown versus the Board of education and the 1965 immigration reform law; both of which were not passed by any legislature.

    I still maintain that Government is the most responsible for the peril we find ourselves in right now. Well, maybe international jewry through our governments, but it is still the government who is screwing us everyday.


    If this Richard Hunt is an european, then I give him a lot of credit because he is really bucking the trend (hell, he would be wierd for an american, but anti-government, libertarian rhetoric has a lot bigger audience here than it does in Europe from any sources I have seen on the web, and also from talking to various Europeans for a decade now on the WWW; for instance i have yet to meet a European who likes the idea of no prohibitions against gun ownership which is one of the fundamental basic rights). Like him, I tend to think that our society would do best if it based itself on ancient Icelandic society (notice no prohibition against sword type or sizes there). Yes, it is simplistic and probably unrealistic, but i think the society described in the Sagas was probably one of the best that has ever existed. Small, localized, village-based libertarianism is how I would describe the Icelandic model. I say Iceland, because I think a tribal council (Allthing) better serves the people than the kings did in Norway, Sweden, or Denmark.

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    Question Escapee Colonies

    Compelled by real pressures, this group set out to create a colony far from the troubles that beset them at home.

    Their plight sound familiar?

    Why do you think their New Okinawa is failing/failed?
    How would/should they done it better?

    EX-OKINAWANS CARVE A NEW LIFE IN SOUTH AMERICA
    Bolivia's Japanese `island'
    Posted on Sat, Jan. 07, 2006
    By Jack Chang

    OKINAWA, Bolivia - More than five decades ago, Shiko Asato fled his war-destroyed home on the remote Japanese island of Okinawa looking for a new life.

    That search sent him and nearly 300 other Okinawan migrants across the ocean, through the jungles and plains of South America to a hot, humid stretch of eastern Bolivia where disease, flooding and drought awaited.

    Yet Asato and his fellow refugees did what millions of migrants around the world have done: They persisted and built a new home for themselves.

    Today, the three settlements that make up Okinawa, Bolivia, are testaments to the years of toil Asato and other migrants spent carving out lives from the then-wild Bolivian countryside.

    Now a wizened 78-year-old who can't walk on his own, Asato remembered how he and other settlement founders had to clear whole forests to build Okinawa's roads and farms.

    ``It was a jungle, and we had to cut everything down with our own hands,'' Asato said in a mix of Japanese and poor Spanish. ``We cried because it was so dark at night.''

    But all the struggle and homesickness was worth it, he said. His family now farms nearly 2,000 acres of its own land and lives in one of the many Japanese, tile-roof mansions that dot Okinawa.

    ``We live like they do in the United States,'' he said.

    Hidden in the Bolivian countryside, by poor roads about 50 miles from the city of Santa Cruz, Okinawa is a bubble of Japanese culture amid the peasants and small farms of the region.

    The 900 Asian residents of Okinawa are also a major economic engine, controlling 125,000 acres of land and selling the soy, rice, wheat and other crops they grow there throughout South America.

    That they built their town out of the jungle over just a few decades is an inspiration to local Bolivians such as Alfredo Martínez, who works on an Okinawan farm.

    ``It's something that gives us an example,'' Martínez said. ``These people earn and they strengthen themselves.''

    In their homes and community centers, the Asian residents of Okinawa have held onto whatever they can of the lifestyles and customs of their native land.

    Many speak Japanese and local Okinawan languages to each other rather than Spanish, with some old-timers speaking practically no Spanish. Using the rice and soy they grow, they make noodles and tofu. They watch Japanese television beamed via satellite.

    In the afternoons, when the rains and heat subside, elderly Okinawans emerge from their air-conditioned mansions to play gate ball, a Japanese version of croquet, on well-manicured courts.

    In an enormous community center, they practice taiko drumming and other Japanese arts. On a recent week, posters advertising a performance by Japanese folk singer Tazuko Miyara titled ``Breezes from the Native Land'' were all over town.

    ``I have always lived in the colony, and there are always Japanese people around, so there's no need for me to speak Spanish,'' said Yukifumi Nakamura, who migrated from the Okinawan islands in 1963, married a local Japanese woman and now owns more than 1,200 acres.

    During the 20th century, tens of thousand of people left Okinawa province, a cluster of islands off the southern tip of Japan, and migrated to spots around the Pacific Ocean and the Americas.

    Long one of Japan's poorest regions and once a separate kingdom, Okinawa also was one of its hardest hit areas during World War II and became the site of major U.S. military bases after the war.

    With Okinawa's economy devastated, 19 boatloads of migrants left the islands for Bolivia from 1954 through the 1960s, drawn by Bolivian government offers of 124 acres of land per family.

    Upon arriving, migrants discovered that land was in forested terrain plagued by devastating floods. Shortly after settling on the banks of the Rio Grande, 15 migrants died from a mysterious disease.

    Of the 3,376 migrants who came, about two-thirds moved on to neighboring countries such as Brazil and Peru or returned to Japan.

    The ones who stayed prospered, aided in no small part by donations from the governments of Japan and Okinawa province.

    Despite the success, the future of Okinawa as it has been for the past five decades is uncertain.

    About half of its young people have moved to Japan, and most of its founders are dead. Thousands of Bolivians work on the settlement's farms.

    source

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