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Thread: The Kalevala: Finnish Epic Folk Poems

  1. #11
    Senior Member Sigel's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Arcturus


    Who are you calling a fairy!?
    Not you mate! As far as I know a fairy has wings and a little wand.

    Elves on the other hand are a mysterious folk with a language incomprehensible to outsides, a mind-bending mythology and are more than able to kick any Soviets out of their forests.

    Your secret’s safe though, you’re among friends. We won't tell
    A people which takes no pride in the noble achievements of remote ancestors
    will never achieve anything worthy to be remembered with pride by remote descendents.

    Lord Macauley

  2. #12
    Member Frostwood's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by perkele14
    Yes, it is curious to see how these sometimes differing elements are interwoven in our mythology. It would also be interesting to see the whole dissected, revealing the different "proto-ethnic" elements in each as there obviously were few migrational waves from which the "whole" consists of.
    Yes, it would indeed be interesting. We can though decipher the tales of the old and find different meanings and recordings of cultural evolution in them.

    Weren't the Finno-Ugric people shamanistic at first, before the great waterflood event? They lived in a sort of dream-world, having not a clear, distinct self-image, but rather they felt they were in harmony with their environment, like in the lap of a loving Mother. There was a goddess called Kultainen Eukko (Golden woman), who was thought to hold man on her lap, like a container of sorts. People were born in foetal position, and they died in foetal position, ready to be born again from the Mother. As Indo-European influences (most notably the Hammer-Axe culture) extended their touch into these old traditions, societal structure changed as agriculture was introduced, creating larger and permanent communities because of a stable food source was available. Patriarchy was introduced and Kultainen Eukko was demonised as Louhi, the witch from the cold Pohjola.

    An another way of saying this (Runo 1) is that when a duck was flying around in search of a place to nest at, she found that Ilmatar's knee was an ideal place, thinking it was some patch of grass. She then laid the eggs there and sat on them, causing a lot of heat. Ilmatar wasn't happy of this, and she shook her leg and the eggs resting there rolled off into the water. This event was the "breaking" of the worldview, because these eggs cracked as they hit the waters, and the upper half of them formed the sky up there and the lower half the earth down here. The sage Väinämöinen was born from one of these eggs, but he didn't see neither the moon or the sun. Thus, he decided to open the eggshell, but by doing that he was cast into the water and floated there for many a year, until he set his foot upon a shore.

    Now he could see day and night, observing from a land without name, without trees.

    [I though I'd just give a quick reply, but it seems I just couldn't resist ]

  3. #13
    Account Inactive perkele14's Avatar
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    Yes, there can be seen hints of the transformation from "feminine" to "masculine".

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