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Thread: Share Your Traditional Recipes!

  1. #61
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    Post Ethnic Recipes!

    Recommend recipes of your favorite ethnic cuisines !
    Perhaps try them out and let us know how it tastes?

    I personally enjoy alot of Polish dishes, so I'll start off by sharing a simple traditional recipe for Kapusta!

    Kapusta
    (Serving Size: 4)

    INGREDIENTS:

    • 1/2 pound salt pork, diced
    • 1/2 medium head cabbage, cored and shredded
    • 1/2 (16 ounce) package medium egg noodles
    • ground black pepper to taste

    DIRECTIONS:

    1. Place the salt pork in a large skillet over medium heat. Cook, stirring frequently until the fat has melted down and the meaty parts are cooked. Add shredded cabbage, and cook over medium-low heat until tender, stirring to coat the cabbage with the salt pork drippings.
    2. Meanwhile, bring a large pot of lightly salted water to a boil. Add egg noodles, and cook until tender, about 7 minutes. Drain. When the cabbage has cooked completely, stir egg noodles into the cabbage, and season with black pepper to taste.
    3. Eat!

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  3. #62
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    Post AW: Ethnic Recipes!

    I have many that I enjoy, and one that I'm dying to try out: Bavarian Apple Pancakes, yummy!

    Here's a link: http://www.hungrymonster.com/recipe/...pe_id_int=5419. But for the real thing, I would ask a Bavarian.

    Also, I have it on good authority that Bavarian apple pancakes are especially good with melted chocolate.

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    Yule Food From Iceland

    Kjötsúpa - Mutton Soup
    1 kg (2 lbs) mutton, cut in chunks
    1 1/2 l (3 pints) water
    1 onion, coarsely chopped
    1/2 head 500g (1 lbs) white cabbage, chopped
    4-5 carrots, sliced
    500 g (1 lbs) rutabaga, peeled and cut into chunks
    1/2 cup rice
    1 tablespoon salt

    Cover the mutton with the water in a large casserole, add salt and bring to a boil. Skim off the fat and cook for 30 minutes, then add the vegetables and rice. Allow to simmer for about 45 minutes, stirring occasionally. Remove the mutton, serve separately with potatoes. You will need a large serving bowl for the soup.


    Jólagrautur - Yule Porridge
    1/4 l (1/2 pint) water
    1 1/2 l (3 pints) milk
    150 g (6 oz) rice
    1 teaspoon salt
    70 g (2 1/2 oz) raisins
    cinnamon and sugar
    milk
    1 almond

    When the water comes to a boil, stir in the rice and cook for 10 minutes. Add the milk to the pot and cook over a low heat for 1 hour. Add the raisins in the last 10 minutes. Add salt to taste. Add milk, sugar, and cinnamon to taste. The skinned almond is added and the porridge poured into a bowl. The housewife deals portions out and whoever finds the almond receives a small gift.

    Hangikjöt - Smoked Mutton
    1 kg (2 lbs) Hangikjöt
    1 l (2 pints) Water

    Put the Hangikjöt and water in a pot. Slowly, over a period of a half hour, heat to boiling. Boil the Hangikjöt for 45 minutes to 1 hour for each kg (2 lbs). Allow to cool in the broth. Hangikjöt is usually served cold with mashes potatoes, or potatoes in Bechamel (white sauce), and accompanied by green peas.

    Rjúpa - Rock Ptarmigan
    2-3 Rock Ptarmigan
    50 g (1 1/2 oz) bacon
    50 g (1 1/2 oz) butter
    2 dl (1 cup) boiled water
    30 g (1 oz) margarine
    3 tablespoons flour
    2 dl (1 cup) milk
    Caramel coloring, salt
    Redcurrant jelly
    3-4 tablespoons whipped heavy cream

    Clean the Ptarmigan as for other fowl. Soak in half milk, half water for several hours. Pat dry and insert the bacon pieces into the breast of the Ptarmigan. Heat the margarine, then place the Ptarmigan into the pan and brown well. Remove from the saute pan and place them in a pot, breast side down. Add hot water and milk. Simmer for 60 to 90 minutes. Strian the stock, allowing enough to remain in the pot with the Ptarmigan to prevent drying. Melt the butter in the saute pan and add the flour. Cook the roux until golden, then add enough of the Ptarmigan stock to make a rich veloute. Add caramel coloring to taste, then add the seasoning and redcurrant jelly. Fold the whipped cream into the sauce just before serving. Ladle over the Ptarmigan.
    Serve with boiled or caramel potatoes, cooked, halved apples, and redcurrant jelly.

    Laufabrauð - Leaf Bread
    1 kg (2 lbs) Flour
    1/4 teaspoon Baker's Ammonia
    1 teaspoon Salt
    6-7 dl (3 pints) milk
    Fat for deep frying

    Heat the milk just to the boiling point. Sift the flour together with the hartshorn and the salt. The milk is stirred into the flour mixture and the whole is kneaded into a glistening, rather tough dough, then formed into a long roll. Cut the roll into pieces and roll out very thin. This is best done on a well-floured pastry cloth. The bread is formed with a round dish and then decorated. As each piece is completed, place between linen towels to prevent drying. Just before cooking, prick with a fork, being careful not to disturb the design. Deep fry on high heat, decorated side down, until golden-brown. Serve with butter or margarine.

    Kleinur
    900 g (2 lbs) Flour
    240 g (8 oz) white sugar
    60 g (2 oz) margarine
    1 teaspoon Hartshorn [US: cream of tartar]
    1/2 teaspoon baking soda
    5 teaspoons baking powder
    1/2 l (1 pint) milk
    1 egg
    Cardamom extract. [US: cover 1T. crushed cardamom seed with unflavored Vodka. Cover and soak overnight. Use filtered liquid as extract]

    Combine the margarine and flour and add the other dry ingredients. Make a well in the flour and add the milk, egg, and extract. Knead well to make a smooth dough. Roll out to finger thickness. Cut into diamonds. Make a diagonal slit in the middle of each and pull one end through the slit. Deep fry untill golden-brown.

    Lambalæri - Leg of Lamb
    1 Leg of Lamb
    Salt, pepper
    1 cup heavy cream
    2-3 tablespoons flour

    Put the leg of lamb on a grid in a roasting pan and pour 1 litre (2 pints) of water into the pan. You can also put the Leg of Lamb in a roasting bag without liquid. Place into oven. Heat oven to 150-175 deg. C (280-325 deg. F), and roast for one hour for each kilo (2 lbs) of weight. Baste occasionally with the stock form the roasting pan. For the last half hour of cooking switch on the grill, [US: broiler] and grill the Leg of Lamb on both sides. If you use a roasting bag, remove it from the bag for the last half hour and grill in the same way.

    Strain the stock into a casserole and skim off the fat. Thicken the sauce with flour, or your favourite thickening, season and colour with gravy browning. Add the cream and remove from the heat. Serve with your choice of vegetables and caramel potatoes.

    Hamborgarhryggur
    - Smoked Rack of Pork
    Smoked Rack of Pork
    Place the rack of pork [Us: pork loin, bone-in] in enough wather to cover.

    Braise for 30 to 45 minutes for each kg (2 lbs). You may season the liquid with whole pepper, mustard seed, or cloves. After braising, remove from liquid and roast in an oven preheated to 175 deg C (382 deg F). Glaze with brown sugar.
    Serve with caramel potatoes, carrots, green peas, Brussels sprouts, cauliflower, and e.g. red wine sauce.

    Brúnaðar kartöflur - Caramel Potatoes
    Ca 500 g (1 lbs) Potatoes, medium size, cooked and peeled
    40 g ( 1 1/2 oz) margarine
    5 tablespoons sugar

    Place the sugar in a heavy saute pan and heat until it begins to melt. Carefully stir in the margarine. When golden, remove from heat, and add potatoes, rolling them carefully around until they are coated with the caramel.
    Lík börn leika best.

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  7. #64
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    Trollkrem

    2 cups (5 dl) lingonberries, or
    1/2 cup (1 1/4 dl) lingonberry jam
    2/3 cup (1 1/2 dl) sugar
    2 egg whites, from large eggs

    Wash berries and remove all unripe berries and foreign objects. Combine all ingredients in a mixing bowl and beat until the volumes quadruples. about 15 minutes. If you are using lingonberry jam, omit sugar. Serve in a crystal dessert bowl sprinkled with a few lingonberries. If available, add a few mint leaves. Cookies are a great accompaniment, or serve in Crisp Wafer Cups (Krumkakeskåler). Serves 8


    Trollkrem II

    A different kind of troll cream combining the lingonberries with currants and strawberries, and topping it off with vanilla sauce.

    1 1/2 cups (3-4 dl) lingonberries or
    1 cup (2 1/2 dl) red currant plus 1/2 cup (1 1/4 dl) strawberries or raspberries
    1 cup (2 1/2 dl) sugar
    2 egg whites

    Serve with Vanilla Sauce.

    Everyday Vanilla Sauce (Vaniljesaus til hverdags)

    1 1/2 cups (3 1/2 dl) milk
    1 1/2 tbsp. sugar
    1 egg, large
    1/2 tbsp. potato flour
    1 1/2 tsp. vanilla sugar

    In a heavy sauce pan combine milk, sugar, egg, and potato flour While stirring, bring to the boiling point over medium hear. It must not boil. Remove from heat. Stir the sauce from time to time as it coos. Serve chilled. Makes 1 3/4 cup.
    Lík börn leika best.

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    Thumbs Down Danish Recipes

    A brilliant page with hundreds of Danish recipes. I can especially recommend the "Boneless Birds", the "Cooking Roasts with Beer" and the "Spiced Danish Meatballs".

    A lot of these recipes you will know from other Scandinavian recipes, e.g. the Boneless Birds as "benløse fugler" from Norway or the Meatballs as "köttbullar" from Sweden.

    But the Danish recipes are in some cases somewhat special...

    Follow the link
    Lík börn leika best.

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    I've grown very fond of Danish cooking, and have used quite a few of the recipes from that link that you posted, Blutwölfin. I'm finding that I prepare atleast one Danish dish per week, and I'm always pleased with how tasteful, and satisfyingly rich such meals are...

    Some of the most wonderful recipes from that link, which I would recommend with great enthusiam, are: Oksesteg I Surfløde, Kødbudding, Stuvet Oksekød, and Stegt Gås Fyldt med Æble... there are many more excellent dishes to try, but those I listed have remained consistent favorites of mine, and have been recieved very welcomely by guests whom I've prepared them for.

    Oh, now I am really hungry for a nice, sweet Sveskekage!

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    Hmmm, good thread... I'm looking forward to learn some Scandinavian traditional recipes too... vegetarian ones for me, of course... probably mostly deserts, but still good...

    I just shared my favourite traditional borsch recipe in another thread here.

    Now... I'll share another favourite traditional recipe which I learned, this time, from my grandfather. It's a traditional Daco-Romanian shepherd's recipe, and it is called bulz. There are many varieties of it, but the one I know from my grandpa is of course my favourite one, and the one I eat and do myself when given the chance. On my grandpa's side, as far as he remembered when I asked him, and as far as I remember now too, most of the men in his genealogy line were shepherds or at least they owned sheep... So this recipe probably belongs to a family tradition, shared generation by generation.

    I'm not so good with writing recipes... I'm just outlining the main parts of it. The bulz is made of corn flour (maize), traditional sheep cheese and butter. Of course, also some salt. First we have to make mămăligă from corn flour (maize), boiling water and a little bit of salt (quite similar to polenta)... When the mămăliga is ready we take some of it and put it on the plate, and then put traditional sheep cheese over it, and then again another layer of mămăligă to cover it, so the cheese will stay inside the hot mămăliga and melt. We can also cut a little bit on the top of this, adding some butter inside, and then cover the cut with some more mămăliga. And this is all, quite simple and traditional!

    I didn't find any proper picture of it over internet... but I found that a world record of the longest bulz in the world was set in a village quite close to the home village of my grandfather. Quite exciting to find out that, hehe! Here is one article I found (including a traditional recipe quite close to the one I learned):

    Longest Bulz: world record set by the villagers from Turia

    TURIA, CV, Romania -- Over 300 inhabitants of the Commune of Turia have participated at the creation of a bulz of 150,32 meters, which was divided in 7.500 portions consumed rapidly, setting the world record for the longest Bulz.



    Photo: At the preparation of the bulz was necessary of 400 kg of maize, 150 kg of sheep cheese, 15 liters of oil, 24 kg of salt and 450 liters of boiled water. 240 women from the commune floured sheep cheese and rolled the bulz. (enlarge photo)

    In order to boil the hominy there was necessary of the strength of 75 men who rolled in the 15 kettles full of hominy, and in the end they shared the hominy with the paddle on the long raw of tables.


    ...

    The Bulz is a very popular Romanian dish based on "mamaliga", and consists of balls of mamaliga filled with cheese and butter and roasted in the oven.

    "Mamaliga" is a fat-free, cholesterol-free, high-fiber food. It can be used as a healthy alternative to more refined carbohydrates such as white bread, pasta or hulled rice.

    ...

    Bulz traditional recipe:

    1. Make a medium hard polenta.
    2. Take pieces the size of a medium Apple and fill each ball of polenta with 1-2 teaspoons of Cheese.
    3. Then grill the balls, preferably over an open fire.
    4. They are ready when they are golden brown outside and the Cheese is melted inside.


    Source
    Again, this is a traditional vegetarian recipe... and a quite simple one, even if the one given in the article above is a bit different from the one I know. I like to eat and cook simple food, not overly cooked or too complicated... Simpler is better and also healthier!

    Some other recipes mention also cooking the bulz in the oven, but I don't do that. Over cooked food is not so healthy.

    Sometimes my bulz can look somehow like the one in the below picture (but smaller, of course, for one person, and not with cheese on the top, only with cheese inside):

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Actually it is healthy to eat corn with dairy products, because otherwise some of the substances our bodies need to assimilate from corn cannot be assimilated. I read that in a book about cereals. So the bulz is also one of the healthiest ways to eat corn (as long as it is organic/bio non-GMO corn, of course).

    My grandfather also made some delicious omelette, but it was with bacon (a traditional type, called slănină, or other traditional types) too, so it was not vegetarian. It was basically a quite normal omelette, just with added slănină (or other traditional types of bacon) and of course again sheep cheese to it. My grandfather loved traditional sheep cheese, made by shepherds, and so do I!
    Die Farben duften frisch und grün... Lieblich haucht der Wind um mich.

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    That bulz looks tasty!

    My nan used to make English bubble and squeak, just potatoes, carrots, sweetcorn and cabbage (onions too if some people want that in there.)

    Click image for larger version. 

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    You need to add some butter and olive oil to heat up in a frying pan. Most of it's made with veggie leftovers.
    (It doesn't matter how old the song is, I won't stop liking it).

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    This is the Scottish Haggis, which I also enjoy because it's full of various ingrediants.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Oatmeal, spices, suet, salt, onions, sheep pluck, barley. Vegetarian haggis doesn't include meat and is replaced with beans, lentils and maybe soya.
    (It doesn't matter how old the song is, I won't stop liking it).

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