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Thread: Share Your Traditional Recipes!

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    Thumbs Up Share Your Traditional Recipes!

    The idea for this thread is originally from here.

    Please post your traditional recipes here!

    In addition to the instructions how to prepare the dish, it would be interesting to know what it means to you, which time of the year it is usually eaten, etc.

    If your recipe includes some hard-to-find ingredients that are not available everywhere, it might be a good idea to include some possible alternatives -- unless fo course you feel it would be inappropriate to cook this dish without all the traditional ingredients.

    I'll post some Finnish recipes here soon.

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    I started it, I'll go on:


    Viking Bread

    Ingredients:
    2 cups of flour
    1 cup of whole grain flour
    1 teaspoon of dry yeast
    1 teaspoon of salt
    1 cup of comestible grains
    2 cups of warm water.

    Preparation:

    1. Put all the flour in a bowl with the salt and mix it. put the dry yeast in the warm water until it melt. Then add it to the flour in the bowl. The Vikings use to use dry green peas but you could substitute some other ones, like the grain of the sunflower would do the same here. Put half of the grain into the bowl, mix.

    2. Now pour in the water with yeast and mix it with a wooden spoon, until it is hard to stir. At this stage you now will knead the dough. Add flour so that the dough doesn't stick to our hands.

    3. When the dough is nicely kneaded and doesn't stick you are going to put it on a pan already oiled. Take the rearest of the grain and sprinkle them on top of your bread.

    4. Put it in a cool oven, it will help the rising process. While it rises, set the oven to around 190° and let it cook for about 1 hour.


    Färskost (Skyr)

    Ingredients

    6 cups skim milk
    1 cup buttermilk
    Rennet
    2 tablespoons sour cream
    1 tablespoon milk
    Candy thermometer to check milk temperatures

    Check the rennet package for specific instructions on how much rennet to use. This will vary depending on whether you are using vegetable rennet or not, and whether it is liquid, granular, or tablets. If you are not using liquid rennet, you will need to dissolve the rennet beforehand in a little tepid water. Ideally this should be done in a small measuring cup which has been pre-warmed using hot water.

    Heat the milk to 185-195°F (85-90°C) and hold it at that temperature for about 10 minutes. Be careful not to boil or scorch the milk. Cool down to 100-102°F (38-39°C). It is important that you allow the milk to cool properly, or else the rennet may not work. Check the rennet package instructions for heat tolerance guidelines.

    Stir the sour cream (or skyr, if you're lucky enough to have the Icelandic variety) into a tablespoon of milk until well mixed. Pour into the warm milk and mix well. Add the rennet.

    You now need to allow the rennet to work its magic. For best results, the skyr needs to cool down gradually. I sometimes use a crockpot for making skyr, because the insulated cooker and heavy stoneware vessel cool very slowly. Allow the skyr to cool about 6 hours. You will be ready to proceed to the next step when you can make a cut in the skyr which will not close immediately.

    Line a sieve or colander with cheesecloth or a fine linen cloth and pour in the skyr. Tie the ends of the cloth together over the top and hang over a bucket or other container so the whey can drip off. Be sure to retain the whey -- it can be used to pickle foods, and adds lots of flavor to recipes when substituted for part or all of the water. Allow the skyr to drain until it is fairly firm. The consistency should be like ice cream.

    Before serving, whip the skyr with a whisk until smooth. Skyr should not be lumpy or grainy. Skyr may be served with cream and honey, and goes very well with fruit such as bilberries or lingonberries.

    Skyr may instead be flavored with garlic, chives or caraway seeds.


    Nässelsoppa (Nettle Soup)

    Ingredients

    2 quarts fresh nettles
    2 tablespoons butter
    2 tablespoons wheat flour
    1 quart good bouillon
    salt
    1/2-1 teaspoon thyme
    1/2-1 teaspoon marjoram
    1/3 cup chopped chives
    4 cooked egg yolks, chopped finely

    Wash nettles well. Cover nettles with bouillon and boil for 5 minutes or until just tender. Drain the liquid off the nettles and save it. Chop the nettles. Melt the butter in a saucepan. Add a little flour to the butter and stir until it starts to brown, then gradually add the bouillon. Add the nettles back in, then cook at a simmer for 3 to 4 minutes. Season to taste with salt, thyme, marjoram, and chives. Place into individual bowls and garnish with chopped egg yolk.


    Osyrat Kornbröd (Barley Flatbread)

    Ingredients

    1-1/2 cups barley flour
    1/2 cup water

    Blend ingredients together until a stiff dough is formed. Warm a griddle over a fire (or you can use a cooking sheet in the oven). Take a heavy rolling-pin and take a ball the size of a walnut and roll the ball until flattened. Roll outward so that it is as thin as you can until you have a flat, round disk. Lay it on the griddle and and place it over the fire (or cook at high heat in the oven) about 30 seconds on either side. One flat loaf at a time, roll out the dough and cook. It is most efficient to have two people, one rolling dough and one cooking flat loaves.

    The bread should be eaten immediately, but may be frozen and then reheated. They are good with all Viking foods but also may be eaten with butter or Skyr.

    1:
    Lík börn leika best.

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    Question about a cup:

    How big is it in desilitres (dl)?

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    Kokt Svinmålla (Boiled Lambsquarters)

    Lambsquarters (Chenopodium album, also called fat hen, goosefoot, or pigweed) are a member of the same family as chard and beets. From the Viking Age until nearly the end of the Middle Ages, lambsquarters has played the same role in cooking as spinach does now.

    Lambsquarters are an ancient food that has been almost completely forgotten today. It is uncertain whether lambsquarters were domesticated or gathered in the wild during the Viking Age, but ample finds have been made of lambsquarters from the Bronze Age to suggest that it was being deliberately cultivated. The leaves of lambsquarters are edible and contain more iron, protein and Vitamin B12 than spinach. Lambsquarters were a valued vegetable crop throughout early Europe until spinach was introduced from Asia in the 16th century.

    Lambsquarters are found today as weeds at the edges of ditches and gardens. They have several near-relatives, such as orache (Atriplex patula) and spear-leaved orache (Atriplex prostrata), which are also good to eat. All these plants may be boiled just like spinach or used in salads. To make four servings:

    1 lb. fresh, very young, tender lambsquarters
    2/3 cup water
    dash or two of salt
    Rinse the lambsquarters. Add the salt to the water and bring to a boil. Add in the lambsquarters and boil for about 5 minutes. Pour off the liquid and allow the lambsquarters to drain. Serve with a little butter.


    Kornmjölsgröt (Barley Porridge)


    Makes about 4 to 6 servings.

    10-15 cups of water
    salt
    Two cups of chopped barley kernels, soaked overnight in cold water
    A handful whole grain wheat flour
    A handful crushed hazelnuts
    3-4 tablespoons of honey

    Put the ingredients in a large pot. Pour 10 cups of water in the kettle and heat to a rolling boil. Stir regularly, reducing heat if needed to maintain a low boil. Add water if needed if the mixture starts getting too thick. Cook until done.

    There are two ways to serve porridge. The first is "hot breakfast cereal" style. For this type of porridge, about 15 to 20 minutes before the porridge is done, add a cup of chopped fruit, such as apples, pears, rose hips, etc., then serve with fresh cream and some butter on top. Any left-overs may be pressed into a buttered mold and chilled for storage a day or two, then sliced, fried in butter, and served with either a hot fruit compote, or with butter and jam.

    Another way to serve porridge is to make it a savory dish. The Poetic Edda mentions the god Þórr eating porridge with herring in it. I've had good results adding chopped chicken, veal, or pork. The meat should be added to the porridge early enough in the cooking process so that it is cooked thoroughly. For fish, this will be closer to the end than it will be for the various meats. You can also add garlic, onion, and other herbs and spices. This makes a hearty, filling dish.
    Lík börn leika best.

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    Kalakukko (Fish-cock)

    This is an ancient national food prepared and eaten in Savo (eastern Finland).

    Ingredients

    (Serves 4-6)

    Filling

    2 lb small fish (bass, vendaces)
    1 1/2 lb pork, sliced into strips like bacon, but about 1/4 to 1/2 inch thick.
    3 Tbsp salt (omit salt if pork is already salted)
    allspice (optional. Traditionalists omit this)

    Dough

    2 1/2 cups water
    3 1/4 cups rye flour (sifted)
    1 3/4 cups wheat flour (sifted)
    4 tsp salt
    1/2 oz yeast (2 standard packages)

    Procedure

    1. Clean the fish, removing fins, large scales, and entrails. You may leave the heads if you dare to eat them.

    2. Mix the flours, and salt. Add the yeast to the water.

    3. When the yeast is fully dissolved, make a thick dough by pouring flour mixture into water and blending well. The ratio of flour to water depends on the nature of the flours. This ratio of 1:2 by volume works well in Finland with Finnish flours. Where flours contain more gluten you should use slightly less water.

    4. Set aside 4 Tbsp of dough to be used later. Roll out the remaining dough into a circular shape 3/4 inch thick.

    5. Assemble the meats into the dough: cover the inner half of the dough circle with half of the pork (the pork should cover a circle whose diameter is half the diameter of the rolled dough). Then put all of the fish over top of the pork, and add allspice and extra salt if you are using them. Finish with the second half of the pork.

    6. Preheat oven to Lift the edges of the dough all around the filling and glue together with a little water so that you have the filling surrounded from all directions with 3/4-inch-thick dough. Put upside down (the seam downwards) on a baking sheet and let it rise about half an hour at room temperature.

    7. Put the kalakukko in a oven for long enough to brown the dough, which will seal it against moisture. Then lower the temperature to about and let it bake for 4 to 7 hours depending on the size of the fish (bigger fish need more cooking time). You can brush some melted butter over the top of the dough just after lowering the temperature; this will give it a prettier appearance. If it starts to leak while baking, fill holes with the dough which was set aside.

    8. Serve hot or cold.



  7. #7
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    Blutwölfin have you ever been to Iceland, you seem to have a very good knowledge about our island, and now you show your self to even know a few of our traditional dishes which aren’t that known outside Iceland

    and may I suggest serving skyr with cream and a bit of sugar as well as a bunch of fresh blueberries 0000:

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    I'm interested in the recipe for that Icelandic "treat", rotten shark (which tastes so awful you have to follow it with a shot of Black Death). 1:

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    Found this on some random website:

    Traditional method:

    Take one large shark, gut and discard the innards, the cartilage and the head. Cut flesh into large pieces.Wash in running water to get all slime and blood off. Dig a large hole in coarse gravel, preferably down by the sea and far from the nearest inhabited house - this is to make sure the smell doesn't bother anybody. Put in the shark pieces, and press them well together. It's best to do this when the weather is fairly warm (but not hot), as it hastens the curing process. Cover with more gravel and put heavy rocks on top to press down. Leave for 6-7 weeks (in summer) to 2-3 months (in winter). During this time, fluid will drain from the shark flesh, and putrefication will set in.

    When the shark is soft and smells like ammonia, remove from the gravel, wash, and hang in a drying shack. This is a shack or shed with plenty of holes to let the wind in, but enough shade to prevent the sun from shining directly on the shark. Let it hang until it is firm and fairly dry: 2-4 months. Warm, windy and dry weather will hasten the process, while cold, damp and still weather will delay it.

    Slice off the brown crust, cut the whitish flesh into small pieces and serve, preferably with a shot of ice-cold brennivín (Direct translation: Burning Wine, a.k.a Black Death).

    The modern method for curing shark relies on putting it into a large container with a drainage hole, and letting it cure as it does when buried in gravel.
    mmmm tasty indeed :laugh:

    http://www.isholf.is/gullis/jo/shark.htm

    1: 1: 1:

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    Hmmm, I wonder what kind of sick, depraved minds originally came up with this particular delicacy?

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