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Thread: Share Your Traditional Recipes!

  1. #31
    Senior Member Náttfari's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Louhi

    Even if I don't eat mammals [...]
    ! :O :annoysigr

    You should do as I, have a list of animals to eat in your life.

    Reindeer (soon to be done!), polar bear (not the liver though, it might kill me), elk, seal, tons of birds, goats, along with the milk (the cheese I have tasted) :bier: etc. etc.

  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Náttfari
    ! :O :annoysigr

    You should do as I, have a list of animals to eat in your life.
    Well, I'm sure Louhi is partial to eating whaever she fell with own crossbow.

    I admit that I, too, am a bit unconfortable eating something that's lived all its life in a tiny cage with a plastic feeding tube stuck down its throat. :speechles

    Reindeer (soon to be done!)...
    -smil

    Sauteed Reindeer

    50g of butter
    400g of reindeer meat
    1 dl of water or beer
    salt
    black pepper
    crushed garlic

    Melt the butter in a pot. Add the reindeer and then cover with a lid. When the liquid has evaporated, add the crushed garlic, salt and pepper. Allow the meat to brown, turning it carefully. Add the water or beer and then leave to simmer for 30 minutes. Serve the hot meat with mashed potatoes and cranberries.



    .... polar bear (not the liver though, it might kill me), elk ...
    Elk lasagne is a fantastic dish. Did you ever eat "regular" bear?

    Everyone; when in Tallinn, Estonia, make sure to visit this restaurant. It's a medieval restaurant, they serve only food made according to medieval recipes, and use ingredients that were available at the time. If you're lucky, they'll have bear on the menu -- although it's expensive.

  3. #33
    Sonja
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    Quote Originally Posted by Náttfari
    ! :O :annoysigr

    You should do as I, have a list of animals to eat in your life.

    Reindeer (soon to be done!), polar bear (not the liver though, it might kill me), elk, seal, tons of birds, goats, along with the milk (the cheese I have tasted) :bier: etc. etc.
    All this talk of eating exotic animals reminds me of the Swedish Chef's attempt to make chocolate mousse:



    :

  4. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eldritch
    One more question regarding rotten shark: which species of shark is it made out of, or does it matter?
    No idea :O

    Quote Originally Posted by Eldritch
    Unlike rotten shark and sheep heads which (hopefully!) are more like curiosities rather than everyday food.
    hehe no it isn’t everyday food , rather what we used to eat two centuries ago, although some do still eat if around a festival we call "Þorrablót".

    I feel obligated now to post some of my favourite delegacies ( those earlier ones posted by Blutwölfin are also quite typical Icelandic, especially Skyr)



    Kleinur - Icelandic twisted “Donuts”

    Ingredients:
    3 eggs
    1 cup sour cream
    1 cup milk or buttermilk
    2 tsp. soda
    1 tsp. salt
    1 tsp. Cream of Tartar
    1 1/2 cups sugar
    1 tsp. vanilla
    1 tsp. nutmeg
    Enough flour to roll (approx. 4 cups)

    Method:
    Beat eggs slightly and add sugar and beat some more. Gradually add the sour cream mixed with soda and milk alternately with the dry ingredients. This will take about 4 1/2 cups of flour. Mix it and pour out onto the floured board and divide into three portions and roll each out to approx. 1/4 inch thick and cut into 1 inch wide strips and then into about 2 1/2 inch long pieces. Put a slit in the centre of each and fold one end through the slit. Fry in deep fat Crisco in an electric deep fryer at about 375 degrees. Keep turning them till they are golden brown, about 3 minutes. After they have drained on paper towel, sprinkle with powdered sugar when ready to serve.


    Pönnukökur - Icelandic Pancakes

    Ingredients:
    1/3 cup sugar
    1/4 tsp. salt
    1/4 tsp. cinnamon
    1/2 tsp. baking soda
    1 tsp. baking powder
    1 1/2 cups flour
    2 eggs
    1/2 tsp. vanilla
    2~3 drops of almond extract
    1/2 cup sour cream
    2 cups milk
    1/8 lb. melted butter.

    Method:
    Sift and mix together all the dry ingredients in a bowl. In a separate mixing bowl, blend eggs, milk, buttter, sour cream, vanilla and almond extract. Continue blending and gradually add the dry ingredients until a smooth thin batter is achieved. It is advisable to let the batter stand for 20-30 minutes before using.

    Use a flat stove crépe pan to make the thin pancakes. A special pan and spatula are available from Iceland. They definitely produce the best results. Pre-season your crepe pan.

    When pouring the batter onto the hot pan, angle and rotate the pan with your wrist to help the batter flow thinly and quickly over the surface. Return pan to the stove as soon as possible so as not to loose the heat. Using the tip of a long crepe spatula, separate the outer thin edge of the crepe from the pan almost immediately to prevent burning. Cook for a minute or until your crepe is a light golden brown on the underside. Flip the crepe over on the pan for about 10 seconds and then flip it onto a plate where you can stack the crepes as they are cooked.

    Sprinkle the pönnukökur with mixture of sugar and cinnamon and roll up tightly. Alternatively they can be spread with whipped cream and jam or fruit and then folded in quarters.

  5. #35
    Senior Member 3ngelbrekt's Avatar
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    Converting weights, volumes and temperatures

    I found these 2 links that might be of some help converting recipes between countries/cultures.

    German Recipes Conversion Chart - Umrechnungstabelle

    and

    Cooking Ingredient Weight Conversion

    /S

  6. #36
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    Blutwölfin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lundi
    Blutwölfin have you ever been to Iceland, you seem to have a very good knowledge about our island, and now you show your self to even know a few of our traditional dishes which aren’t that known outside Iceland

    and may I suggest serving skyr with cream and a bit of sugar as well as a bunch of fresh blueberries 0000:

    There's kind of special connection between Iceland and me: I'm a rider, my family breeds Icelandic horses in Northern Germany, I'm a trainer for Icelandic horses and we've bought some of them directly in Iceland. So I stayed on horse farms for severals weeks each year (until I moved to Austria; now my vacations in your beautiful country have - unfortunately - stopped) and we've got also some Icelandic friends living near us in Lower Saxony, working with horses here or having their own farms and training stations. And who sometimes serve great traditional food...
    Lík börn leika best.

  7. #37
    Senior Member Valhöll's Avatar
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    Recipes taken from http://www.isholf.is/gullis/jo/meats.htm#top

    Beinlausir fuglar - "Boneless Birds"

    1 1/2 kg. lamb, beef, or horse meat
    50 gr. butter/margarine
    Salt and pepper for taste.
    500 ml. of water
    100 gr. of bacon
    30 gr. of flour

    Traditional preparation: Cut the meat into thin slices, and roll each in a mixture of salt and pepper. Put a slice of bacon on each slice of meat, roll up and tie up with twine. Brown on a hot pan. Add the water and cook until done through. Use the flour to thicken the sauce. Serve with potatoes, rhubarb jam and green peas.

    Easy method (Recommended), with bacon and mushrooms: Cut the meat into bite sized pieces and brown on a frying pan. Put in a pot with the water and bring to the boil, lower cooking temperature to simmer. Cut the bacon into pieces, fry lightly and add to the meat. Cut one large onion in half and cut the halves into thin slices, crosswise. Fry on a pan until transparent and add to the meat. Cut some fresh mushrooms (about 1/2 kg.) into slices and fry in butter until soft. Add to the meat. Simmer until the meat is done.

    Flavour the dish to taste with salt and pepper, and Season-All (optional). I always add a touch of garlic as well. You can make a sauce out of the cooking liquid by thickening with flour, but I recommend just pouring everything into a large bowl and serving it up that way. People will be wanting to drink the cooking liquid afterwards! By using more water, you can make this into a hearty, warming soup.
    Serve with potatoes - boiled or caramelized - and a fresh salad.
    Lúðubuff - Fried halibut steaks

    1 1/2 kg.:Halibut (or turbot, sole or other flat fish)
    4 tblsp: Flour
    2 tsp.: Salt
    1/3 tsp.: Ground pepper
    150 gr.: Oil, butter or margarine
    100gr.: Onions

    Take one small, whole halibut. Cut off the head, tail and fins. Scrape off the slime and loose scales under cold, running water. Cut the fish into slices, about as thick as your thumb is wide. Mix together flour, salt and pepper. Coat the slices with flour mixture and fry in the hot fat until done (3-4 minutes on each side). Remove from the pan and arrange the steaks on a serving dish. Slice the onions and brown in the fat, remove and put on top of the fish. Pour some water on the frying pan, roll it around and pour over the fish. Serve with cooked potatoes, green salad and lemon wedges.
    -Try grilling the fish steaks: cut into large cubes and thread onto skewers with onion pieces, fresh mushrooms and pieces of red bell pepper (capsicum).
    The Lúðubuff is delicious , I managed to try some that my mother cooked up some time ago. I have yet to sample the Beinlausir Fuglar, have any Icelanders here managed to try this? :

  8. #38
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    yes "beinlausir fuglar" (we used to call them beef and bacon rolls in my family) made from beef are very very very nice, my mother used to serve them with Green pepper sauce :icon_razz

  9. #39
    Senior Member Valhöll's Avatar
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    I swear this thread is making me hungry just reading it...

  10. #40
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    Icelandic method of preparing rotten shark, usually eaten at old heathen festivals we have still to day like Þorrablót.

    Traditional method:
    Take one large shark, gut and discard the innards, the cartilage and the head. Cut flesh into large pieces.Wash in running water to get all slime and blood off. Dig a large hole in coarse gravel, preferably down by the sea and far from the nearest inhabited house - this is to make sure the smell doesn't bother anybody. Put in the shark pieces, and press them well together. It's best to do this when the weather is fairly warm (but not hot), as it hastens the curing process. Cover with more gravel and put heavy rocks on top to press down. Leave for 6-7 weeks (in summer) to 2-3 months (in winter). During this time, fluid will drain from the shark flesh, and putrefication will set in.

    When the shark is soft and smells like ammonia, remove from the gravel, wash, and hang in a drying shack. This is a shack or shed with plenty of holes to let the wind in, but enough shade to prevent the sun from shining directly on the shark. Let it hang until it is firm and fairly dry: 2-4 months. Warm, windy and dry weather will hasten the process, while cold, damp and still weather will delay it.

    Slice off the brown crust, cut the whitish flesh into small pieces and serve, preferably with a shot of ice-cold brennivín (brændevin, brennevin, brænnevin).

    The modern method for curing shark relies on putting it into a large container with a drainage hole, and letting it cure as it does when buried in gravel.

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