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Thread: Sacred Norse Literature: Have You Any Queries?

  1. #1
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    Question Sacred Norse Literature: Have You Any Queries?

    We, at Skadi, understand the some times difficult and toilsome readings of passages, poetics, tales and so forth in regard at our folks' olden words. Tis important to clearly understand the messages and properly decipher the metaphours of these works if a kinsman or kinswoman is to verily learn of by what values, from what beliefs and through what practises our heathen ancestors had sailed the seas of the ancient lifejourney.

    Whether you are a northern brother reading the Íslendinga sögur for the third time, a young lady in need of guidance from the olden energies of the runes or a blessed mother-to-be at want of teaching your self the wisdom ahinde Snorra-Eddas Skáldskaparmál, we encourage you to express your understandings, your joys, your sorrows and your confusions with us here at Skadi at the hope to not only help you, but to further our heathen selves as well. As a family, tis important to share with each other and teach one another to that which we personally have been enlightened. This is called brother- and sisterhood. We praise such a concept at Skadi and define our selves by such heroic standards.

    We understand that these sacred words are more than just words, but rather as fields of ancient thought. We know the thoughts dripping from the bloodroots of our heritage are of personal truths as well. One brother of the snows may interpret some event bespoken in any of the ţćttir distinctly to that of another brother and this case may be analogised to a certain heathen symbol withine a ţáttur as well.

    At behalf of the Skadi family, I would like to gift winter sight and spring growth to all of our seed and extend many welcomes to post your queries and ensight aneath in regard at the literature of the Norsemen.

    Erlingr




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  2. #2
    Břndern Ska Gjćnnoppstĺ
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    Some thing I never understood withine the depths of Egils saga Skalla-Grímssonar- one of Náttfari and I´s personal favourites- (kvćđi, 60-62) was the meaning of the swallow out side the window as Egill was in need to write his drapa of 20 stanzas to save his head from kong Eirik Blodřks and dronning Gunnhild. I remember Arinbjörn sitting up with his kinsman all the night through, and he had gone to sit aside the attic window to make a see at the swallow and suddenly saw a shape-shifter in the form of a bird flying away. What was the meaning of this? Who was this shape-shifter and what had s/he wanted to see?



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  3. #3
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    The Swallow; I found little in the footnotes of the book, only that Nornir ("witches") were often shape-shifters (Icelandic: hamhleypa (singular)). It said that this was very similar to some Latin story when the Devil came as a fly and tried to mislead some guy.

    I can research more, but I myself believe 'tis a symbol of evil, something distracting him so he won't be able to save his head. Perhaps 'twas fate or a dís that came to see what he was up to?

    If I find out more, I shall post it here.

  4. #4
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    Yes, I too believed that twas a dís who had sat eye on Egill to see of what stirs. The distraction away from Egils writing of the drápa led me to think of the swallow as a cursed stab of magick from dronning Gunnhild; aside the curse of her derisive behaviour and stubbornnes, she learnt from her Chieftain father, to whom she swore upon his death to never yield the the flow of her noble familys blood, how those with power shall crush those with out it. I know as a child, swept away she was by her fathers friđla, who was a hamrammr and a volva, and was later sent away to become a mastress of seiđr. Then a hústrú became on her to Eiríkr, and hatred for Egill was soon begot.

    Honestly, I believe twas she who was the swallow. You and I both are at know of how dearly she awaited the neighing morn, of which she rested certain to give a head-less fate unto our brother Egill! She most likely became the swallow, being the seiđmađr she was, and went to see what he was up to at the attic of kinsman Arinbjörn. Do you agree, a Ghormuil?



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  5. #5
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    I do agreed, friend.

    Here is more information from Egils saga, copied from another post of mine:

    For me, the battle of Brunanburgh is very interesting.

    "Egill Skalla-Grímsson var víđförull og fór međal annars tvisvar sinnum til Englands, ađ ţví er hermt er í sögu hans. Í fyrra skiptiđ gekk hann til liđs viđ Ađalstein Englandskonung og vann fyrir hann frćkinn sigur á Ólafi rauđa, konungi Skota, í orrustunni á Vínheiđi. Á ensku er orrustan kennd viđ Brunanburgh og var hún háđ áriđ 937 e. Kr."

    Translation: Egill Skalla-Grímsson travelled widely and went twice to England, as his saga tells us. The first time, he joined the forces of Ađalsteinn, king of England, and together they conquered Ólaf the red, king of Scotland, in the battle of Vínheiđi (vine-heath). In English the battle is called the battle of Brunanburgh and it was fought the year 937 A.D.

    Taken from: http://malfridur.ismennt.is/vor2002/...hallur-eyj.htm

    In this battle, Egill's brothre, Ţórólfr, died. That was a great loss to Egill, but he wrote a kvćđi (poem) about this (as he often did to comfort himself (and once to save his life)) and regained his joy.

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    I was sad when Ţórólfr died. Remember you, frćndi, when kong Ađalsteinn set eye at Egill from across the table -where all celebrate of victoury- after Ţórólfrs death, with his [Egils] head weighing heavy down and those grey bushy eye brows of him. That was the first time, we saw Egill truly saddened. I was happy to see the comfort Ađalsteinn had shown to Egill and the gifts and silver Egill was gifted as compensations, especially the golden armband, beautiful.

    Remember you what he did with his chests gifted from Ađalsteinn those many years later? Hehe, he did the same thing as his father, at his last days, took it and hid it for eternal sleep; one buried it in a hillside/cave and the other in the sea. This was very interesting.

    Why do you believe Kveldúlfsson and Skalla-Grímsson did this in their final days? What do you believe they learnt in their tested lives that led them to do this and what are we to learn of this? I feel some thing very spiritual was ahinde it and in their olden wisdom, they are showing us what is of true worth in life and what is to be understood as but mere air.

    Praise be to our forefathers at this night, a Ghormuil.



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  7. #7
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    I think that Egill burried his silver because he did not trust any one to handle it, he might've thought that his silver would be spent on nonsense. Also, he might have thought he would one day come back in the afterlife and get it and bring it with himself to Valhöll to present it to Óđinn. Perhaps that burrying the silver barrels was a sacrifice to Móđir nature or the gods themselves.

    Remember that he first wanted to throw his silver off a cliff at Alţingi and listen (he was blind) to the people fight for it? Perhaps he was mad that this plan of his was stopped and decided that if he couldn't spend his silver as he wanted, no one could. He was very avengeful, Egill, a real Viking. Once a warriour, now near blind and old, may be that he was just angry or frustrated.

    Praise be to Egill!!!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Náttfari

    Remember that he first wanted to throw his silver off a cliff at Alţingi and listen (he was blind) to the people fight for it?
    ...of course, I do. I was foolish to not make a connection from this to his final acts at his deathbed. Well done, a Ghormuil.

    Perhaps he was mad that this plan of his was stopped and decided that if he couldn't spend his silver as he wanted, no one could. He was very avengeful, Egill, a real Viking.
    This makes much sense to the way which he lived his life. Remember you when he and his kinsmen were surrounded and captured in this village, in Danmörk I think, and later under this night, they escaped with aide of a farmhand, and had stolen much booty with out any of the villagers being the wiser. Half-way in return to ships, Egill was so angry that he and his band had taken the booty with out honour and having killed no one for it, that he ran back immediately to the village and before the once celebrating, but now shocked, villagers he stood...and killed them all. Egill was very fond of vengeance, as you had said a Ghormuil...a true Viking.



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    Quote Originally Posted by Erlingr Hárbarđarson
    Remember you when he and his kinsmen were surrounded and captured in this village, in Danmörk I think, and later under this night, they escaped with aide of a farmhand, and had stolen much booty with out any of the villagers being the wiser. Half-way in return to ships, Egill was so angry that he and his band had taken the booty with out honour and having killed no one for it, that he ran back immediately to the village and before the once celebrating, but now shocked, villagers he stood...and killed them all. Egill was very fond of vengeance, as you had said a Ghormuil...a true Viking.
    Aye!!! 3:

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    Remember you when an aged Ţórsteinn, Laxdćla saga, moved out of the distrct to elude conflect with men who wanted to become leading men, and made passage to move his home to Hrappsstađir after that years vorţing? Ţórsteinn was accompanied with eleven kinsmen aboard the ferryboat, with Ţórarinn at helm, to make the move to Hrappsstađir, when the ferryboat came to be under the violent mercy of Breiđafjördur currents and had to be ran agrounde at a skerry where just before they drowned to death in near of Guđmundareyjar...an órkn, larger than any one afore seen, began to swim round the ferryboat over and over, with fins longer than any órkns afore. They say that the eyes at the órkn were as humans eyes, and that the men could not take their eyes away from the sight before them. Just as Ţórsteinn gave word to spear it, albeit to no avail, this monstrous storm struck them and their ferryboat...and killed them.

    What does this órkn symbolise? Was the órkn a hamrammr or was it of seiđr from a völva? Why would it taunt such a great man as Ţórsteinn? Was this a test of wisdom for he was so well respected?

    I believe that the storm, which greeted them with the warmth of death, arrived because of their wishes to spear the seal-like creature, instead of allowing it to swim free. Perhaps this völva has a connection to the sea and used her connection on her favour after being given threats by spear. Perhaps Ćge or Ran is involved. I am not certain.



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