Results 1 to 6 of 6

Thread: Music of the West: Classical Music Enhances Brain Function

  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Last Online
    Tuesday, March 13th, 2018 @ 10:14 AM
    Status
    Prolonged Absence
    Ethnicity
    Dutch
    Gender
    Posts
    2,673
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    2
    Thanked in
    1 Post

    Post Music of the West: Classical Music Enhances Brain Function

    Music of the West: Classical Music Enhances Brain Function



    White children benefit from exposure to White music; 'Rap music' is harmful in more ways than the obvious ones. Click the image to read the article.

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Last Online
    Tuesday, August 15th, 2006 @ 11:42 PM
    Subrace
    North Atlantid
    Gender
    Posts
    183
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    2
    Thanked in
    2 Posts

    Music of the West: Classical Music Enhances Brain Function

    Music of the West: Classical Music Enhances Brain Function

    White children benefit from exposure to White music; 'Rap music' harmful in more ways than the obvious ones.


    NOT FOR THE FIRST time in recent years, tests have demonstrated the value of classical music in inducing soundness of mind in the hearers.

    In the Kosice-Saca private hospital in Slovakia experiments in playing music to new-born babies has established that they sleep better and are in every way more relaxed and healthy when classical music is played to them frequently in the days after birth. When they hear it they fall asleep or lie awake peacefully.

    Mozart is the favourite but other classics such as Brahms's Lullaby and Vivaldi's Four Seasons also have greatly soothing effects.

    Not long ago, researchers at the University of Berlin discovered that students listening to Mozart before exams did much better than who listened to other composers or to no music at all. It was judged that the rhythmic qualities of Mozart's music mimic some of the rhythmic cycles which occur in the brain.

    None of this is a surprise to us. The music of Mozart, perhaps more than that of any other leading composer, is the music of order. It induces order in the mind and an ordering of the emotions. By contrast, so much of what today passes for 'pop' music is the music of chaos. It has a fundamentally disordering' effect on the human brain - particularly among White, western peoples, to whom it is neither native not natural.

    It seems not coincidental that the British yob who makes his (and sometimes her) presence so objectionable to people both at home and abroad is nurtured on a diet of the most moronic, mind-bending noise to which the word 'music' is all too often erroneously applied.


    by John Tyndall
    Founding Chairman, British National Party


    Numerous studies have indicated the positive effects of the great music of White civilization on the minds of our people, with some studies indicating benefits even to hearers who are still in the womb.

    While a causitive relationship is not yet proved, according to the scientific journal
    Adolescence there is a definite link between adolescents experiencing 'psychosocial turmoil' and listening to 'heavy metal' and 'rap' music. Researchers admitted that the link may be one of causation or due to the fact that teens with certain psychological problems may be "drawn" to such music, or a combination of the two. It is regrettable that the study did not break out results by race and separate the results for the two genres, which might have been quite different.

    Researchers, led by Dr. Frances Rauscher at the University of California Irvine, reported in 1993 that "listening to Mozart (compared to relaxation instructions or silence) produced a brief but significant increase in performance of a spatial IQ task (involving mental manipulations of folded cut paper) in college students (Nature, 1993, 365, 611)."

    When some other scientists challenged their findings, Rauscher replicated the original study with a larger number of subjects and a greater variety of musical and control experiences, including "silence, Mozart's Sonata for Two Pianos, K448, (the same piece that produced the positive results in the 1993 study) and a group that heard a minimalist work by (non-traditional 'classical' Jewish composer -- Ed.) Philip Glass."

    Here's the really interesting part: "Only the Mozart group showed a significant increased spatial IQ score. In further sub-studies, it was found that listening to a taped short story or dance music did not enhance test scores. Therefore, the facilitation of a measure of spatial IQ seems to be specific to some aspect of the Mozart piece rather than music per se or attending to a story."

    It is no surprise that Glass's piece did not have the effect of some of the real music of Western Man -- even though Glass and his pieces are far from the worst of what the Jewish "modernists" have produced (they seem to me mainly meandering derivatives of real classical music), it seems likely to me that his work is, in ways unconsciously apprehended, nevertheless alien and outside of our tradition and shared mental outlook.

    The atonal and banal nonsense of Jewish-led "modern" classical music has driven people away from classical concert halls in droves and contributed to the Asian and Jewish takeover of serious music in many cities, and to the growth of the corporate packaged garbage that passes for popular music today.

    This fact is nowhere more obvious than in the fact that many civic orchestras with little or no tax funding and commercial classical radio stations, which are dependent on the favor of the remaining cultured portion of the White population, have been forced to almost entirely drop the modernist garbage. The audience simply doesn't want to hear it, so they (thank God!) instead present programs largely consisting of music predating the collapse of the West in the years leading up to WWII. Concert-goers of 1913 would still recognize most of the pieces, though Sibelius and a few others continued to compose real music well into the 20th century -- until they died or (as Sibelius did) quit in disgust.

    (A parallel tragedy occurred in painting. In 1922, the great classicist painter John William Godward, ruined by the Jewish fashion arbiters who had decided that splotches of paint unworthy of a deranged chimpanzee were to be promoted over real Western art,
    stuck his head in a gas oven and left a world that had become intolerable to him.)

    And note well this effect of non-White music on White students: Scientists at the University of Alabama reported in Basic and Applied Social Psychology (1995, 16, 1-15) on the effects of rock and rap "music videos" on political attitudes.

    After watching a series of videos, students then participated in mock elections featuring, among others, an "African-American ethnically liberal" candidate and a "White supremacist" candidate. The study states that although White students preferred rock videos over rap videos, those who were exposed to the rap videos significantly increased their support for the Black multiracialist candidate and decreased their support for the White-identified candidate.

    White children need White art, including music. -- K.A.S
    .



    Friend of Truth, Investigating Truth, Pursuit of Truth, Proof of Truth.

  3. #3
    Senior Member Mistress Klaus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Last Online
    Thursday, March 15th, 2012 @ 06:54 PM
    Ethnicity
    Anglo-Australian
    Country
    Australia Australia
    Gender
    Posts
    1,040
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    3
    Thanked in
    3 Posts
    It's strange because I love both metal & classical. There has been studies that suggest that people who listen to metal & rock generally have a lower IQ and no class (I personally found this rather offensive, as mentioned above I equally love both just as passionately)...A slightly cultured heathen...ha ha.. :icon_lol:

    Classical is musically superior.....representing beauty, emotions of passion/fury/pride and love... Complex....(like nature & the human spirit). Plants & animals adore it. :icon_smil.

    Hip-hop & rap is of the most primitive scale. Borish, repetitive drum (machine) beats & record sampling : ...of no meaning & simplistic ideals. I can't believe whites could even relate to it. : Blues and rock,punk music stems from blacks...hmmm..Interesting considering alot of WN bands play punk/ska styles...quite ridiculous when you think about it. ....So where does one draw the line with music to the point of being completely loyal to your race.?...
    Just listen to classical (only non-Jewish composers), traditional homeland songs/anthems/marches/ and shun the rest? :

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Last Online
    Tuesday, August 15th, 2006 @ 11:42 PM
    Subrace
    North Atlantid
    Gender
    Posts
    183
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    2
    Thanked in
    2 Posts
    Together the classical and metal genres must create some sort of moral equilibrium I used to religiously listen to NSBM but it's not much to my liking anymore.

    Rap music could dumb any child down. Just look at today's youth.
    Friend of Truth, Investigating Truth, Pursuit of Truth, Proof of Truth.

  5. #5
    Senior Member Kurtz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Last Online
    Saturday, July 4th, 2009 @ 08:25 PM
    Ethnicity
    French Canadian
    Gender
    Posts
    537
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    0
    Thanked in
    0 Posts

    How to enter the world of classical music

    This website, the PT50, is very well designed. You can listen to commented extracts of 50 great albums, picked upon by a knowledgeable guy. He also recommends precise editions, so that you're sure of what you buy.

    http://www.npr.org/programs/pt/features/pt50.html

    The PT 50
    PT presents its list of 50 essential classical music CDs, selected by Ted Libbey, our NPR Basic Record Library curator. Below is the most recently aired entry; further down is the entire list.
    "The heavenly motions... are nothing but a continuous song for several voices, perceived not by the ear but by the intellect,
    a figured music which sets landmarks
    in the immeasurable flow of time."

  6. #6
    A.K.A. Autobahn
    "Friend of Germanics"
    Skadi Funding Member

    frippardthree's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Last Online
    Thursday, April 12th, 2012 @ 10:59 AM
    Status
    Available
    Ethnicity
    German
    Ancestry
    Germany, Gaul, England, Austria, Canada
    Subrace
    Paleo-Atlantid
    Country
    United States United States
    State
    Ohio Ohio
    Gender
    Family
    Single adult
    Religion
    Christianity
    Posts
    1,662
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    3
    Thanked in
    3 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Siegfried View Post
    [center] Music of the West: Classical Music Enhances Brain Function

    White children benefit from exposure to White music; 'Rap music' is harmful in more ways than the obvious ones. Click the image to read the article.
    The link does not seem to work anymore, but the subject is interesting enough, that I will post two articles, which I found that also supports this theory.
    MUSIC IN THE WORKPLACE
    Serene Sounds of Success

    As the door swings shut behind you, you no longer notice the sounds of the barking dog, the leaf blower, the garbage truck or even the roar of the freeway. You've stepped into another world, a well-organized office that exists in its own "sound capsule." The air is filled with the gently dancing sounds of the cello, viola and flute. You sigh with relief as a subtle undercurrent of tension leaves your body- a little like the feeling when a noisy refrigerator shuts off.

    "We can't control the chaos out in the marketplace, but the right kind of music can create a balanced work environment that helps our team think more clearly, with sharper focus and improved performance," says Howard Mitchell, president of Venture Dynamics. Increasingly, successful individuals are designing their workspaces to optimize mental clarity and productivity. Ambience and organization are critical, but the right sound environment may affect our brains even more.


    Sound Affects Neurology

    "Hearing is our most primitive sense, neurologically. Audition begins before birth and helps shape brain development. Sound affects brain function much more profoundly than people tend to realize," says Robert J. Doman Jr., founder and director of the National Academy for Child Development (NACD) in Ogden, Utah. It was while working with children that Doman first became aware of the distracting nature of incidental environmental sounds.

    "Imagine," says Doman, "being hypersensitive to specific frequencies of sound and having a short attention span. Now imagine trying to filter out the sound of a lawnmower outside, a car going down the street, forced air rushing through a vent, rock music down the hall, the hum of the computer and to top it all off, the noises coming from inside your own ears. This is the situation facing many children and adults every day."

    Even the highest functioning adults are distracted by extraneous noises in the environment. Hundreds of times every day each of us is momentarily distracted by noises, and then we bring our attention back to the task at hand. This little bit of extra effort, repeated again and again, is a subtle source of stress that actually diminishes our performance.

    Workplace surveys identify interruptions as a leading cause of stress and lost productivity. Top performers who employ simply structured classical music get more out of each hour of work. It helps them recapture time that would otherwise be lost to the unending stream of unacknowledged noise-induced interruptions.


    Classical Music "Recharges the Brain"

    Distracting noises, loud and soft, sudden or droning, pervade almost every work and home environment. The most practical solution is to create low-level sounds that mask or filter the extraneous noise. Over a thirty-year period, Doman and NACD experimented with a wide variety of sound filters.

    They evaluated the experience of thousands of children whose families utilized white noise, environmental sounds, nature sounds and wide ranges of music types. NACD also examined the research in a neurodevelopmental context. They concluded that the best sound filter is simply structured classical music with some nature sounds. Unlike white noise (which can dull auditory function), it measurably enlivens neurological function.

    The renowned French ear surgeon Dr. Alfred Tomatis regarded sound as an essential "nutrient" for the ear, nervous system and brain. He was one of the first researchers to quantify the interconnected effects among the ear, voice and brain. According to Tomatis, the high frequency harmonics in classical music actually "charge the brain" and contribute to overall neurological health.

    We've all seen how music can calm us or lift our mood. Now, a number of recent studies show that exposure to certain music can produce measurable short-term improvements in IQ, as well as positive changes in key neurotransmitters, hormones and immune system markers.

    As educators with a neurodevelopmental perspective, Doman and his staff at NACD understood that extremely high quality recordings of classical music could serve two purposes simultaneously. First, because they supply a wide range of harmonics, they stimulate the brain's auditory and tonal processing ability. Second, the music masks extraneous environmental noise, thus improving focus. So the right kind of music could directly enliven neurological function, actually boosting intelligence while helping people work, think or study with increased attention and reduced distraction.


    Sound Health

    Once they knew what they wanted, the NACD staff began to conceive a new kind of classical music recording. The effort was led by Alexander Doman, a third-generation specialist in neurodevelopmental education, whose focus for the past six years has been on auditory therapies.
    Complete Article:http://www.abtmedia.com/products_shs..._workplace.asp

    PDF Version of article:http://www.abtmedia.com/pdf/Article_..._Workplace.pdf

    The article below actually has a little bit of humor in it.

    Classical-Music Fans May Have More Brains
    By Melinda Bargreen
    Seattle Times music critic

    One of the most fascinating of all medical-research subjects — especially to those interested in the arts — has been the relationship of music to brain function. Classical-music lovers are really going to like the results of recent British and Italian studies that offer one explanation for individual preferences for classical versus pop music: The former may require more brainpower.

    A recent issue of BBC Music Magazine reports the studies of the dementia patients of Dr. Raj Persaud of Maudsley Hospital in London, from which Persaud concludes that there's a link between musical taste and intellectual function. As brainpower diminishes in dementia patients who have previously liked classical music, the patients sometimes begin to prefer pop music.

    As Persaud put it, "What this may mean is that you require more gray matter to appreciate classical music and that you don't need so much gray matter to appreciate pop music, so as you lose gray matter your taste in music changes accordingly."

    Brain damage changes tastes

    Other research suggests Persaud may be right. Writing in the Journal of Neurology, Italian neurologist Dr. Giovanni Frisoni states that dementia's damage to the frontal lobes of the brain (the part most involved in complex judgments) is responsible for those changes in musical likes and dislikes. Since pop music is "composed to appeal to the widest possible audience," as Frisoni put it, "the frontal lesions of our patients might have damaged the circuits that were inhibiting this appeal."

    Of course, Frisoni does not mean that pop-music listeners are brain-damaged. Musical taste, he points out, is an extremely complex issue, depending upon "individual, social and cultural factors."

    Frisoni's own research in Brescia, Italy, reached similar conclusions. Patients suffering from dementia exhibited a complete turnaround in their musical tastes. One 68-year-old lawyer and longtime classical-music lover, for example, who had developed increasing problems with speaking and abstract thinking, began listening to Italian pop music at top volume. Earlier, he had referred to pop music as "mere noise."

    There could be other reasons for such changes in musical preference. As reported in BBC News Health, patients who have damage to the brain's right frontal lobe, where novelty is managed, could be more inclined toward seeking novelty — and pop music would certainly be novel to those who had previously shunned it. Frisoni also thinks that lesions may have damaged the dementia patients' brains in the centers responsible for the perception of pitch, rhythm and familiarity.

    More Mozart effects

    More brain research suggests that playing Mozart — that same composer responsible for the much-touted "Mozart Effect," in which performance on certain aspects of IQ tests was improved following exposure to his music — can also have a beneficial effect on epilepsy patients. John Jenkins of the University of London has found that playing "short bursts of Mozart's Sonata K.448" (the D Major Sonata for Two Pianos) decreases epileptic attacks.

    Other studies suggest that Mozart also has a beneficial effect on coma patients.

    An early start

    Educators have long observed the benefits of early musical training on school performance, and various studies have shown that some areas of the brain are enlarged among those whose "perfect pitch" facility is revealed in that early training. More recently, the American Academy of Neurology has released the results of a study that found "significant differences" in the gray-matter distribution between professional musicians trained at an early age and nonmusicians.

    The musicians in the study had more relative gray-matter volume in five regions of the brain, and "pronounced differences in the cerebellum bilaterally."

    Nature or nurture?

    Study leader Gottfried Schlaug said the study was undertaken to determine whether "intense environmental demands such as musical training at an early age influenced actual brain growth and development," and the study may show that this is the case.

    On the other hand, it's possible, though apparently less likely, that the brain differences were there in the first place. The musicians could have been born with these brain differences, "which may draw them toward their musical gifts," as Schlaug put it.

    In any case, we can be sure that research studies are continuing apace, as scientists plumb these fascinating relationships between music and the brain. At the University of Washington, for instance, the School of Music and the Medical Center are beginning a collaborative study to examine the neurological responses of adult listeners (with varying degrees of music-performance training) to musical excerpts and spoken statements.

    Just remember: If any of you classical fans out there suddenly start craving "Oops! I Did It Again," it just might be time for a quick visit to your neurologist.
    Retrieved From:http://www.lauralee.com/news/classicalbrains.htm
    Attached Images Attached Images

Similar Threads

  1. Classical Music Lovers?
    By Calm Rain in forum Music & Hymns
    Replies: 228
    Last Post: Thursday, January 10th, 2019, 09:40 AM
  2. World History Of Classical Music
    By Caledonian in forum History
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: Wednesday, March 30th, 2011, 05:46 PM
  3. Replies: 0
    Last Post: Sunday, February 28th, 2010, 08:28 AM
  4. Anti-Semitism in Classical Music
    By infoterror in forum Music & Hymns
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: Thursday, December 30th, 2004, 05:38 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •