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Thread: In North Germany

  1. #11
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    The traditional affinity to the forest is indeed a noticeable characteristic of German spirit and culture, and every map on ground usage shows that the share of wood areas and also the existance of greater wood areas is in Germany relatively high, compared e. g. with France or England - but of course in relation to the high population density of Germany.

    The fear of Waldsterben in the 80s was probably also mainly a German story.

    Elias Canetti believed the German forest to be the national symbol of Germany: "German militarism" with the army as the German "mass-symbol" having its origin in the army being the "marching forest" (as the trunks of the trees stand their side-by-side) etc. :icon_evil

    However there are of course no wood areas like in parts of the USA or in Canada which look as if never touched by man and where there's no house or village over 50 or 100 miles. After all also the forest regions in Germany are old Kulturlandschaft.

    Man ſei Held oder Heiliger. In der Mitte liegt nicht die Weisheit, ſondern die Alltäglichkeit.

    SPENGLER

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    Quote Originally Posted by +Suomut+
    Interesting about the species...that surely has more to do with latitude than anything else...don't you think? Same deal with the underbrush...
    I think you're right about that. A cooler summer climate and lower intensity of sunshine, resulting from a more northerly latitude, makes it harder for trees to compete with each other for nutrients, sunlight, etc. Only the stronger trees will tend to survive, leading to a more open forest. Whereas, in a warmer/milder climate, a large number of species can flourish in a relatively small area, because the competition for resources is less intense.

    Another thing I notice about trees in western/northern Europe in the pictures I've seen is that there seems to be an VAST ABUNDANCE! of evergreens (whether that be due to nature or man's influence)...in most of the pics. I've ever seen from Switzerland, Germany, Scandinavia, or Scotland (like in some of Loki's aforementioned pics.) I've always taken notice of the evergreens.
    In Scandinavia this is probably a function of the climate. My understanding is that in places father south in Europe (even Germany), many places that are now covered in conifers used to be covered in deciduous trees. The deciduous trees were clearcut long ago, and the confers planted over the last century or so as part of reforestation projects, since conifers tend to grow more quickly. That's especially true of the forest-stands of conifers one finds in Britain.

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    You guys would like my place. I live in a true Urwald. It is the only grove of Giant Sequoia trees in private hands in the world. Giant Sequoias are the largest living thing in the world. Besides that species I have cedars, white fir, sugar pine and oak trees. My largest Sequoia tree is 52 feet around at shoulder height (4 ft. off the ground). This makes it about 17 ft. in diameter. It is about 250 ft. in height. This is a shady forest but not as shady as the three tiered tropical forests or the three tiered Redwood forests of the California coast.

    Does living in the forest shade favor light pigmentation or blond hair?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dr. Solar Wolff
    Does living in the forest shade favor light pigmentation or blond hair?

    Good question indeed. I would say 'yes' to the pigmentation of the skin but I am unsure about hair--after all, sun bleaches hair considerably in some individuals (myself included).

    Anyway, forests are dear to me as others here have expressed themselves. I live in one of the more forested areas of the US with regard to the percentage of forest cover to total land are of the state. Vermont, New Hampshire and Maine are all somewhere in the ballpark of 90% forest cover. Much of this is reemergence of the forest after farming and thus cleared land declined starting in the late 1800s and continuing until the present.

    The forests around here can generally be classified as 'north-temperate' as we lie in the transition zone between the hardwood (Oak and Hickory) forests further south and the boreal zone (Spruce and Fir) to our north. The primary species are (in common names): Sugar Maple (famed for its sweet sap and the subsequent production of maple syrup), Red Maple, Silver Maple, White Pine, Red Pine, Canada or Eastern Hemlock, Balsam Fir, White, Red and Black Spruce, Paper or White Birch, Yellow Birch, Beech, some Poplars (Aspens), Ironwood, Red Oak.

    The concentrations of each species of course correlates with soil type and most importantly, elevation. Our highest peaks are above tree-line and only support low-growing tundra plants with a few krumholtz firs and spruces. Below this and back into the tree-zone, the Spruces, Firs and Birches reign supreme and slowly gradate into the Maple-Pine-Beech-Hemlock complex.

    Living in the northern half of Vermont as I do and at a middle elevation (1200 feet above sea-level) I am in a more northerly zone with much Spruce and Fir but also Yellow Birch, Sugar Maple, Hemlock, Beech, Quaking Poplar and White Pine.

    For the trees!

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    Quote Originally Posted by AngryPotato View Post
    What park is that?


    I swear I had a very weird dream one night that took place on a path that looked just like that. I was chasing a fair skinned woman around and couldn't catch her. :icon_redf Very strange.

    That's actually my first vision of my wife, before I ever met her. She had a dream about us handfasting in the same scenario. We might have been affected by watching Braveheart.



    Quote Originally Posted by Nordhammer View Post
    I love a nice adventure through the forest.

    My friends and I used to go into the woods behind my house for hours.
    As a Boy Scout and after school every day, or on the weekends and in the yard camping, that's how I spent a lot of my youth and used to walk on a rail trail through the woods to work in high school. In fact, my first job at 14 was clearing brush on a public trail with a Bowie knife. I now make sure to give my children the same experience. Lately, ticks have been bad and we accidentally came upon a breeding ground of toads to the point where it was impossible to walk safely and not step on them. I felt sad and left without the wish of returning.

    Quote Originally Posted by +Suomut+ View Post
    I also have to thank you for posting these pictures, Yggdrasil. I've never set foot in Nord-Deutschland, so I think I'd be surprised to see rural scenes from the area; but honestly, such scenes are in no way 'strange' to me at all. In fact, they VERY MUCH (in most respects) resemble the area I grew up in in North America, on the southeast coast of Georgia, C.S.A. :-| The only diffences I can see between the two areas are:
    1. the species of plants are in general probably different, or course
    2. in this area you present, the foilage probably only stays around for about 1/3 of the year...correct?...since the rest of the year surely it is too cold/wintry for such vegetation. :-? In my old area of coastal Georgia, the foilage will stay around for a good 2/3rds to 3/4rds of the year; since GA is FAR WARMER (usually HOTTER) than Nord. Deut.
    3. the river areas where I'm from in coastal Georgia typically have bigger/wider 'salt-marshes' esp. on each side of said rivers, although the 'fresh/non-salt' water rivers in the areas of of the same generally appearance as the one/ones you show...is that a 'fresh water' river or is it a salt-water river?!...I didn't look on a map...my apologies for that.
    Besides those dissimilarities...there's not much else different. The overall wooded/rural essence of both places is pretty much the same. The woods, the rivers, and most of all that OAK TREE!!!! are the kind of environs I've been in all of my life. More on the oak tree...

    That oak in your picture caught my eye FIRST THING!...firstly, because I LOVE!!!!!! oak trees MORE than any other trees, since I grew up as a child climbing on/playing in oak trees (among other trees, of course)...and of course, I doubt I even have to mention to you the 'special' relationship our ancient Teutonic ancestors/ancestresses had with oak trees. Anyway, when I saw your picture of that oak tree and whenever I see any oak tree from where ever, I'm always reminded of the BIG! oak tree below from my father's old property:


    This is a scene from my the driveway of my father's house (which is behind the photographer) & property taken back in the early 1980s. That HUGE! oak tree on the left side of the picture is my own, personal, most SACRED! oak tree on earth! :suomut: You can't see the branches of it because they are above the picture...but the SHADE for the whole driveway is provided by the branches, which stretch out LONG over and above the driveway. I grew up IN! and around that tree (one had to get ladders in order to climb up into the branches)...it still stands to this day, although my family no longer owns the land. It is probably about 200 years old!! So, it has been around far longer than any living human being. So, know you all have seen MY!! OWN!!! BELOVED!!! OAK TREE!!! :-)

    This land also adjoined a river (salt water one)...so the other pictures you posted of the river scenes from your area are very similar to those from my dad's old land also. I would mention the "moss" in the trees, which are hard to see (I think only NH--being from Georgia himself) in this pic. but can be seen...but, anyway, "moss" from the coastal areas of the American deep South are probably a completely 'alien' sight to most if not all European-born folks and even MOST Americans in other parts of North America who don't have a CLUE about it either...it's a VERY BEAUTIFUL sight to behold in the trees. Anyway,...

    BTW, everyone, that's my nephew on the bike during his boyhood in the picture...he's all GROWN UP! now! lol

    Again, LOVELY PICTURES!!! Yggdrasil...thanks again for posting them!
    Yggdrasil was a name I changed to later, on Skadi, so I guess it was available. As for oaks, they're actually the Celtic tree of the Druids, so Thor's Oak was actually a hybrid sacred grove, just as how the oak is the tree chosen for Robin Hood in Sherwood Forest and England. Ashes are the Germanic tree.

    Quote Originally Posted by Laurelin View Post
    As a piece of trivia, European forests, compared to those in eastern North America, typically have fewer tree species per given area, and tend to be relatively open rather than full of underbrush.

    Anyway, one of the things I like about Germany is that they have done a relatively good job of preserving forests, compared to much of Europe. As you travel farther west, forests there become ever more rare. There are so few intact forests in Ireland, for instance, that one can travel for miles without seeing a single tree (particularly on the western coast). It's rather sad, when you consider the whole land used to be covered in giant trees.
    Growing up in New England, the understory consisted of briars, lady slippers, lilies of the valley, mushrooms and ferns, strawberries and blueberries, along with poison ivy--all of this was on the ground. Most medium story bushes and shrubs actually sealed the woods on the edges, so you could feel wrapped up inside an open forest. It truly felt like home and I became one with the environment.

    Quote Originally Posted by Nordgau View Post
    The traditional affinity to the forest is indeed a noticeable characteristic of German spirit and culture, and every map on ground usage shows that the share of wood areas and also the existance of greater wood areas is in Germany relatively high, compared e. g. with France or England - but of course in relation to the high population density of Germany.

    The fear of Waldsterben in the 80s was probably also mainly a German story.

    Elias Canetti believed the German forest to be the national symbol of Germany: "German militarism" with the army as the German "mass-symbol" having its origin in the army being the "marching forest" (as the trunks of the trees stand their side-by-side) etc. :icon_evil

    However there are of course no wood areas like in parts of the USA or in Canada which look as if never touched by man and where there's no house or village over 50 or 100 miles. After all also the forest regions in Germany are old Kulturlandschaft.

    As for England, the Midlands and Welsh Marches are best for finding old growth. The New Forest in the West Country is almost 1,000 years old. I can't speak for France, sorry.

    Quote Originally Posted by Laurelin View Post
    I think you're right about that. A cooler summer climate and lower intensity of sunshine, resulting from a more northerly latitude, makes it harder for trees to compete with each other for nutrients, sunlight, etc. Only the stronger trees will tend to survive, leading to a more open forest. Whereas, in a warmer/milder climate, a large number of species can flourish in a relatively small area, because the competition for resources is less intense.



    In Scandinavia this is probably a function of the climate. My understanding is that in places father south in Europe (even Germany), many places that are now covered in conifers used to be covered in deciduous trees. The deciduous trees were clearcut long ago, and the confers planted over the last century or so as part of reforestation projects, since conifers tend to grow more quickly. That's especially true of the forest-stands of conifers one finds in Britain.
    I wish that more conifer plantations consisted of spruces, than firs. Pines grow regardless.

    Quote Originally Posted by Allenson View Post
    Good question indeed. I would say 'yes' to the pigmentation of the skin but I am unsure about hair--after all, sun bleaches hair considerably in some individuals (myself included).

    Anyway, forests are dear to me as others here have expressed themselves. I live in one of the more forested areas of the US with regard to the percentage of forest cover to total land are of the state. Vermont, New Hampshire and Maine are all somewhere in the ballpark of 90% forest cover. Much of this is reemergence of the forest after farming and thus cleared land declined starting in the late 1800s and continuing until the present.

    The forests around here can generally be classified as 'north-temperate' as we lie in the transition zone between the hardwood (Oak and Hickory) forests further south and the boreal zone (Spruce and Fir) to our north. The primary species are (in common names): Sugar Maple (famed for its sweet sap and the subsequent production of maple syrup), Red Maple, Silver Maple, White Pine, Red Pine, Canada or Eastern Hemlock, Balsam Fir, White, Red and Black Spruce, Paper or White Birch, Yellow Birch, Beech, some Poplars (Aspens), Ironwood, Red Oak.

    The concentrations of each species of course correlates with soil type and most importantly, elevation. Our highest peaks are above tree-line and only support low-growing tundra plants with a few krumholtz firs and spruces. Below this and back into the tree-zone, the Spruces, Firs and Birches reign supreme and slowly gradate into the Maple-Pine-Beech-Hemlock complex.

    Living in the northern half of Vermont as I do and at a middle elevation (1200 feet above sea-level) I am in a more northerly zone with much Spruce and Fir but also Yellow Birch, Sugar Maple, Hemlock, Beech, Quaking Poplar and White Pine.

    For the trees!
    Well, oak, pine and maple make up the majority of New England, with oaks more in the South and pines more in the North, maples interspersed throughout. Pine is the tree of New England on the flags of Massachusetts and Maine. Of course, you mentioned the totality of species, save for cedars. I lived near a place called Red Cedar Lake in Lebanon, CT, named for the cedars of Lebanon. I used to collect wood for the fireplace at our home there and it smelled so nice.

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    Lensahn Ostholstein

    Quote Originally Posted by Yggdrasil View Post
    This park is located in Lensahn, in Ostholstein
    Lensahn had been on the way from our living place to our farm.
    We drove by frequently .
    There is a huge carp lake on the right side comming from Schönwalde,
    emptied each late autumn.

    I also had a construction site in Lensahn for Waldorf School .
    And my father often halted at an ice cafe on the tour home from the farm .


    But honestly, I would not have recognized the location again by the attached pictures.
    Mk 10:18 What do you call me a good master, no-one is good .

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