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Thread: Presence of Tat-C in Ancient Mongolia

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    Presence of Tat-C in Ancient Mongolia

    Presence of Tat-C in Ancient Mongolia
    International Congress Series
    Volume 1261 , April 2004, Pages 325-327

    Does the Tat polymorphism originate in northern Mongolia?

    C. Keyser-Tracqui et al.

    Abstract

    It has been suggested that the Y-chromosomal T→C transition arose in Mongolia ~2400–4000 years ago. To test this hypothesis, we screened 2300-year-old Mongolian male specimens and ancient Yakut male specimens for this Y-chromosomal marker. Our results demonstrate that the mutation was present in Asia 2300 years ago.

    ...

    In the past few years, a large number of polymorphic markers have been identified on the Y chromosome. Among these is the T→C transition (locus RBF5) reported by Zerjal et al. [1] and later called the Tat-polymorphism. The C allele of this biallelic marker has so far been observed only in populations from Asia and northern Europe. It reaches its highest frequency in Yakuts, Buryats, northeastern Siberian populations and Finns (Table 1).

    ...

    In this study, we screened ancient Mongolian samples from the Egyin Gol necropolis for the Tat marker. The Egyin Gol necropolis, located in northern Mongolia, is ~2300 years old and belongs to the Xiongnu culture [3]. In addition, we genotyped the T→C mutation in ancient Yakut specimens excavated at two sites in the Sakha Republic (Yakutia) [4].

    ...

    All of the seven ancient Yakut individuals tested showed the C allele, confirming that the mutation occurred most probably before their migration from southern regions. Concerning the Xiongnu people, two of them harboured the mutation suggesting that the Tat polymorphism already existed in Mongolia 2300 years ago.

    ...

    In conclusion, our study showed that the C allele was present in parent populations to the modern inhabitants of Mongolia or Yakutia, suggesting that the mutation may have arisen in Mongolia more than 2400 years ago [1]. Moreover, our work suggests that the Xiongnu tribe under study may have been composed of some of the ancestors of the present-day Yakut population.

    [Article]

    [Source]

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nordhammer
    Presence of Tat-C in Ancient Mongolia
    International Congress Series
    Volume 1261 , April 2004, Pages 325-327

    Does the Tat polymorphism originate in northern Mongolia?

    C. Keyser-Tracqui et al.

    Abstract

    It has been suggested that the Y-chromosomal T→C transition arose in Mongolia ~2400–4000 years ago. To test this hypothesis, we screened 2300-year-old Mongolian male specimens and ancient Yakut male specimens for this Y-chromosomal marker. Our results demonstrate that the mutation was present in Asia 2300 years ago.

    ...

    In the past few years, a large number of polymorphic markers have been identified on the Y chromosome. Among these is the T→C transition (locus RBF5) reported by Zerjal et al. [1] and later called the Tat-polymorphism. The C allele of this biallelic marker has so far been observed only in populations from Asia and northern Europe. It reaches its highest frequency in Yakuts, Buryats, northeastern Siberian populations and Finns (Table 1).

    ...

    In this study, we screened ancient Mongolian samples from the Egyin Gol necropolis for the Tat marker. The Egyin Gol necropolis, located in northern Mongolia, is ~2300 years old and belongs to the Xiongnu culture [3]. In addition, we genotyped the T→C mutation in ancient Yakut specimens excavated at two sites in the Sakha Republic (Yakutia) [4].

    ...

    All of the seven ancient Yakut individuals tested showed the C allele, confirming that the mutation occurred most probably before their migration from southern regions. Concerning the Xiongnu people, two of them harboured the mutation suggesting that the Tat polymorphism already existed in Mongolia 2300 years ago.

    ...

    In conclusion, our study showed that the C allele was present in parent populations to the modern inhabitants of Mongolia or Yakutia, suggesting that the mutation may have arisen in Mongolia more than 2400 years ago [1]. Moreover, our work suggests that the Xiongnu tribe under study may have been composed of some of the ancestors of the present-day Yakut population.

    [Article]

    [Source]


    It appears that Tat-C is indeed a gene marker that arose in a Mongol population.

    But this need not mean that those carrying it are Mongols.

    Tat-C looks like it was passed from northern Siberia to Europe through genetic drift. By the time it got to the Baltic, it was being carried by Caucasoids.

    Today, Finns are more than 90% European in terms of the whole genome, yet they carry more than 50% Tat-C.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jakub
    Today, Finns are more than 90% European in terms of the whole genome, yet they carry more than 50% Tat-C.
    Certainly raises an eyebrow doesn't it. Personally I'd rather err on the side of caution.

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