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Thread: Yule

  1. #21
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    Thank you.......!

    Quote Originally Posted by Aemma View Post
    It sounds like an absolutely wonderful tradition Grimsteinr. You and DSW are indeed very very lucky to not only have a kindred but the room to host such a wonderful celebration. How wonderful! And such a long tradition (since 1995) now as well! That is truly something to be proud of! I'm quite certain you know how lucky you are, but thought I'd remind you...just in case!

    I wish you and your DSW and kinfolk the happiest of Yules!

    Frith...Aemma
    Hail Aemma,
    We've only been out here on this place, since 2003. Before that at the suburban home in Indianapolis, we had a large, secluded, back yard, where we originallybuilt the Stone Horg. When we moved out here we disassembled it, stone by stone & brought it along.
    It has been a ton of work, over the years. And, I could not do it all without DSW Sharon, to help me. She even helped me, in the building of the Horg. It has over 3 tons of stone. She handled nearly every piece.
    We are indeed lucky, fortunate. to be where we are........We do appreciate that. But, a lot of has just been due to our own, day by day, hard work.
    Anyone else, hoping to "Build the Folk", hoping to do "Right", by the Gods,
    could do the same. It takes but "putting one foot in front of the other",
    doing what needs to be done. We are proud of our Efforts.
    Thank you again.........

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    [QUOTE]
    Quote Originally Posted by Fallen Angel View Post
    Of course, our. How else would you say "your" in the first person plural? :p I was refering to me and my fellow Christians.

    Then "We Christians" would have worked better would it not have?

    .


    ...... let's focus this one on the Yule goat shall we.
    Yes great idea,, let's ! That is the great thing about Yule and being a HEATHEN . All of the fun, and you dont even need jayyyyyzus if you don't want, and I dont want.

    To me yule celebration has nothing to do with "Christmas". Christmas, is a Christer marketing ploy because there is nothing positive or European about that Semitic sadomasochistic cult.

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    Yule is a sacred time of Peace to the World, the Peace of Freyr , the Lord to Sweden - bringer of Holy Frith.....

    .... and there, at least, its more the Swine or the Hog's head... as it used to be in old England. But if you want a Yule goat to sacrifice too -- well, why not! And a fire perhaps....

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    12 Nights of Yule

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    Yule (Ćrre-Giuli, Hrutmanudhr , Jól, Jul, Yuletide, December)

    If you’ve ever heard the Christmas Carol “The Twelve Days of Christmas” modern heathens opt to celebrate this as the Twelve Days of Yule, with the last day culminating on 12th Night. Since ancient calendars followed a different method of time, the solstice celebrations as well as later ‘Christmasy’ style observances can vary from place to place as to when they occur. Today, most Pagans and heathens celebrate the yuletide as running from approximately December 20 – December 31 (but there are variations).
    We do know that the celebration of Yule wasn’t always twelve days long. In the Norse text Heimskringla: The Saga of Hakon the Good talks about it once lasting for three days, or as long as the ale lasted. The night it began was known as the slaughter night, where animals would be ritually slain. Their meat later used to feed the community, as well as the Gods. It was King Hakon of Norway, who as a Christian passed a law that the Christian Christmas Day (which was already a weird bastardization of the Christian story of the Nativity and Saturnalia/Mithraic customs) and the Pagan yuletide celebrations were to henceforth be celebrated at the same time. While this only specifically impacted Norway (and its territories), it illustrates an intentional combining of the holy-days into one celebration.
    In Gulathingslog 7 we see that Yule was celebrated ‘for a fertile and peaceful season’ we also see in the Saga of Hakon the Good that Odin was hailed as a bringer of victory, Njord and Freyr were also hailed for peace and fertility. Grimm’s Teutonic Mythology speaks of how Frau Holle’s annual wagon toured the countryside during the yuletide season for blessings of a fertile year ahead. Deities associated with winter like the winter hunters Ullr and Skadhi are also sometimes hailed. Since this is the day of darkest night, Nott (Goddess of Night) as well as silver-gleaming Mani (God of the Moon) may be honored. Some will also honor Dagr (God of Day) and Sunna (Goddess of the Sun) as she will only grow in prominence in the months ahead.
    Many modern scholars believe that a Mid-Winter or Winter Solstice celebration has been an important part of indigenous European traditions and culture since at least 2400 BC by one name or another. Although we do not know exactly, there is much discussion among Historians and Archeologists about when the name Yule truly came to be a mainstay name. We do know that this time of the year has been commonly recognized as Yule since before 1000 AD at the latest. The Name Yule is thought, by many scholars, to be an expression of the name Odin representing the eternal wheel and sometimes the sun.
    (Read more by following the link)


    http://nordicwiccan.blogspot.com/201...s-of-yule.html
    (It doesn't matter how old the song is, I won't stop liking it).

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    Excellent information which I will need to make use of for next Yule.

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  8. #26

    Yule


    Yule (also called Jul, Julblot, jólablót or "Yule time" or "Yule season") is a festival historically observed by the Germanic peoples. Scholars have connected the original celebrations of Yule to the
    Wild Hunt, the god Odin, and the pagan Anglo-Saxon Mōdraniht("Mothers' Night").


    Later departing from its pagan roots, Yule underwent Christianised reformulation,[1] resulting in the term Christmastide. Some present-day Christmascustoms and traditions such as the Yule log, Yule goat, Yule boar, Yule singing, and others may have connections to older pagan Yule traditions. Cognates to Yule are still used in the Scandinavian languages as well as in Finnish and Estonianto describe Christmas and other festivals occurring during the winter holiday season.



    Yule is the modern version of Old NorseJól and Jólnir one of the names for Odin. The Old Englishderivates ġēolor ġēohol and ġēola or ġēoli, indicates the 12-day festival of "Yule" (later: "Christmastide") and the latter indicating the month of "Yule", whereby ǣrra ġēola referred to the period before the Yule festival (December) and ćftera ġēolareferred to the period after Yule (January). Both words derive from Gothic𐌾𐌹𐌿𐌻𐌴𐌹𐍃 (jiuleis); Old Norse, Icelandic, Faroese and Norwegian Nynorskjól, jol, ýlir; Danish, Swedish, and Norwegian Bokmĺl jul, and are thought to be cognate with Proto-Germanic*jehwlą-.[2][3] The etymological pedigree of the word remains uncertain, though numerous speculative attempts have been made to find Indo-European cognates outside the Germanic group, too.[4] The noun Yuletide is first attested from around 1475.[5]




    The word is conjectured in an explicitly pre-Christian context primarily in Old Norse. Among many others (see List of names of Odin), the long-bearded god Odin bears the name Jólnir ('the Yule one'). In Ágrip, written in the 12th century, Christmas, jól is interpreted as coming from one of Odin's names, Jólni(r). In poetic language, a plural form (Old Norse jóln) may also refer to the gods collectively. In Old Norse poetry, the word is found as a term for 'feast', e.g. hugins jól (→ 'a raven's feast').[6]



    It has been thought that Old Frenchjolif (→ French joli), which was borrowed into English in the 14th century as 'jolly', is itself borrowed from Old Norse jól (with the Old French suffix -if; compare Old French aisif "easy", Modern French festif = fest "feast" + -if).[7] But the Oxford English Dictionary sees this explanation for jolif as unlikely.[8] The French word is first attested in the Anglo-Norman Estoire des Engleis, or "History of the English People", written by Geoffrey Gaimar between 1136 and 1140.



    Germanic paganism

    Yule is an indigenous winter festival celebrated by the Germanic peoples. The earliest references to it are in the form of month names, where the Yule-tide period lasts somewhere around two months, falling along the end of the modern calendar year between what is now mid-November and early January.


    Attestations

    Yule is attested early in the history of the Germanic peoples; in a Gothic language calendar of the 5–6th century it appears in the month name fruma jiuleis, and, in the 8th century, the English historian Bedewrote that the Anglo-Saxoncalendar included the months geola or giuli corresponding to either modern December or December and January.[11]




    While the Old Norse month name ýlir is similarly attested, the Old Norse corpus also contains numerous references to an event by the Old Norse form of the name, jól. In chapter 55 of the Prose Eddabook Skáldskaparmál, different names for the gods are given; one is "Yule-beings". A work by the skaldEyvindr skáldaspillir that uses the term is then quoted: "again we have produced Yule-being's feast [mead of poetry], our rulers' eulogy, like a bridge of masonry".[12] In addition, one of the numerous names of Odin is Jólnir, referring to the event.



    The Saga of Hákon the Good credits King Haakon I of Norwaywho ruled from 934 to 961 with the Christianization of Norway as well as rescheduling Yule to coincide with Christian celebrations held at the time. The saga says that when Haakon arrived in Norway he was a confirmed Christian, but since the land was still altogether heathen and the people retained their pagan practices, Haakon hid his Christianity to receive the help of the "great chieftains". In time, Haakon had a law passed establishing that Yule celebrations were to take place at the same time as the Christians celebrated Christmas, "and at that time everyone was to have ale for the celebration with a measure of grain, or else pay fines, and had to keep the holiday while the ale lasted."[14]




    Yule had previously been celebrated for three nights from midwinter night, according to the saga. Haakon planned that when he had solidly established himself and held power over the whole country, he would then "have the gospel preached". According to the saga, the result was that his popularity caused many to allow themselves to be baptized, and some people stopped making sacrifices. Haakon spent most of this time in Trondheim. When Haakon believed that he wielded enough power, he requested a bishop and other priests from England, and they came to Norway. On their arrival, "Haakon made it known that he would have the gospel preached in the whole country." The saga continues, describing the different reactions of various regionalthings.[14]




    A description of pagan Yule practices is provided (notes are Hollander's own):

    It was ancient custom that when sacrifice was to be made, all farmers were to come to the heathen templeand bring along with them the food they needed while the feast lasted. At this feast all were to take part of the drinking of ale. Also all kinds of livestock were killed in connection with it, horses also; and all the blood from them was called hlaut [sacrificial blood], and hlautbolli, the vessel holding the blood; and hlautteinar, the sacrificial twigs [‌aspergills‌]. These were fashioned like sprinklers, and with them were to be smeared all over with blood the pedestals of the idols and also the walls of the temple within and without; and likewise the men present were to be sprinkled with blood. But the meat of the animals was to be boiled and served as food at the banquet. Fires were to be lighted in the middle of the temple floor, and kettles hung over the fires. The sacrificial beaker was to be borne around the fire, and he who made the feast and was chieftain, was to bless the beaker as well as all the sacrificial meat.[15]



    The narrative continues that toasts were to be drunk. The first toast was to be drunk to Odin "for victory and power to the king", the second to the gods Njörđrand Freyr "for good harvests and for peace", and third, a beaker was to be drunk to the king himself. In addition, toasts were drunk to the memory of departed kinsfolk. These were called minni.



    Theories and interpretation

    Scholars have connected the month event and Yule period to the Wild Hunt(a ghostly procession in the winter sky), the god Odin (who is attested in Germanic areas as leading the Wild Hunt and bears the name Jólnir), and increased supernatural activity, such as the Wild Hunt and the increased activities of draugar—undead beings who walk the earth.[16]





    Mōdraniht, an event focused on collective female beings attested by Bede as having occurred among the pagan Anglo-Saxons on what is now Christmas Eve, has been seen as further evidence of a fertility event during the Yule period.[10]





    The events of Yule are generally held to have centered on midwinter (although specific dating is a matter of debate), with feasting, drinking, and sacrifice (blót). Scholar Rudolf Simek says the pagan Yule feast "had a pronounced religious character" and that "it is uncertain whether the Germanic Yule feast still had a function in the cult of the dead and in the veneration of the ancestors, a function which the mid-winter sacrifice certainly held for the West European Stone and Bronze Ages." The traditions of the Yule log, Yule goat, Yule boar (Sonargöltr, still reflected in the Christmas ham), Yule singing, and others possibly have connections to pre-Christian Yule customs, which Simek says "indicates the significance of the feast in pre-Christian times."[17]




    Yule - Wikipedia
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yule
    Yule ("Yule time" or "Yule season") is a festival historically observed by the Germanic peoples. Scholars have connected the original celebrations of Yule to the Wild Hunt, the god Odin, and the pagan Anglo-Saxon Mōdraniht. Later departing from its pagan roots, Yule underwent Christianised reformulation, . . .




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