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Thread: Mixed Races and Health Problems

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    Post Mixed Races and Health Problems

    Study: Mixed-Race Youth Have Health Woes


    By CONNIE CASS
    Associated Press Writer

    October 31, 2003, 11:56 AM EST


    WASHINGTON -- Students who consider themselves of more than one race are more likely to feel depressed, have trouble sleeping, skip school, smoke and drink alcohol, a study says.

    Based on national surveys of 90,000 middle school and high school students, the study found that young people of mixed race are at higher risk for stress-related health problems.

    For example, students who described their race as both black and white reported more difficulties than those who considered themselves solely black or solely white.

    "It did not matter what races the students identified with, the risks were higher for all of them if they did not identify with a single race," said Dr. J. Richard Udry, principal author of the study published Thursday in the American Journal of Public Health.

    While the study suggests that mixed-race teenagers suffer from more stress, Udry said, it does not say why. He noted that many smaller studies have looked at emotional and health issues for teenagers of mixed race.

    "The most common explanation for the high-risk status is the struggle with identity formation, leading to lack of self-esteem, social isolation and problems of family dynamics in biracial households," said Udry, professor of maternal and child health at the University of North Carolina School of Public Health.

    Raul Caetano, a professor of epidemiology at the University of Texas School of Public Health, said further research is needed to confirm that being of mixed race causes stress.

    "It may be especially important with adolescents, at this developmental stage where the development of your own identity is so important -- it's exactly what you're struggling with," said Caetano. "It's already stressful, and these kids may have an additional layer of stress to deal with."

    The findings were drawn from data compiled in 1994-95 by the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, which is based at the University of North Carolina. Students could give more than one answer when asked their race.

    Unlike Census data, which adults answer for their households, the survey directly questioned teenagers, who sometimes identify themselves differently than their parents would. This gives a better picture of how teenagers' self-concept affects their health, the authors said.

    But some students were inconsistent, giving different answers when asked about their race at different times.

    "An adolescent may have problems with ethnic identity the parent may not be aware of or may minimize," Caetano said.

    The study found that mixed-race students, compared with single-race students who share part of their racial makeup, were more likely to report having sex at younger ages, having access to guns, getting drunk, considering suicide and suffering various aches and pains.

    Yet in other types of characteristics -- including grades, verbal ability and parents' education -- the study found that mixed-race students tend to fall between the single-race adolescents who shared part of their background. For example, Asian students had higher grade-point averages than whites, and children with both Asian and white parents had averages between those two peer groups. [Corroborated also by various IQ studies which show mixed-race people fall between the two parental stocks.]

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    American Journal of Public Health: http://www.ajph.org/

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    Post Students of mixed races report suffering more health problems

    Students of mixed races report suffering more health problems

    CHAPEL HILL -- A new study that involved surveying 90,000 adolescent U.S. students showed that those who considered themselves to be of mixed race were more likely than others to suffer from depression, substance abuse, sleep problems and various aches and pains. Conducted by researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and the National Institutes of Health, the investigation found that adolescents of mixed race were more likely to have other health problems as well.

    "It did not matter what races the students identified with, the risks were higher for all of them if they did not identify with a single race," said Dr. J. Richard Udry, principal author of a paper on the work appearing in the November issue of the American Journal of Public Health.

    "Most of the risk items we assessed may be related to stress, and so we believe being of mixed race is a source of stress," Udry said. "From this work, we cannot identify further the sources of that stress. More research is needed to identify those sources and possibly suggest programs that might help biracial adolescents."

    Udry is professor of maternal and child health at the UNC School of Public Health, professor of sociology in UNC's College of Arts and Sciences and a fellow at the Carolina Population Center. His co-authors are Dr. Rose Marie Li, formerly of NIH, and Janet Hendrickson-Smith, research associate at the UNC center.

    The new findings derive from data compiled as part of the UNC-based National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, the largest and most comprehensive survey of teen-agers ever conducted in the United States.

    In the detailed surveys they completed, students could give more than one answer when asked about their race. Those who called themselves biracial tended to be more likely to smoke and drink, Udry said. Overall, older biracial children were more likely to have sex at younger ages, to have access to guns and to have poorer experiences at school such as through suspensions, skipping class and repeating grades.

    In characteristics not related to traditional risks, such as grades, vocabulary, family structure and family education, mixed-race adolescents often fell between single-race adolescents, he said. For example, Asians had higher grade-point averages than whites and were more likely to have a college-educated parent, but children with both Asian and white parents had averages between those two peer groups and were more likely to have a parent who attended college than white-only adolescents.

    "Quite a few studies attest in some way to the emotional, health and behavioral risk problems of multiracial adolescents," he said. "The most common explanation for the high-risk status is the struggle with identity formation, leading to lack of self-esteem, social isolation and problems of family dynamics in biracial households."

    Since some previous studies found no differences between biracial and single-race children, Udry and his colleagues wanted to explore the relative risk of mixed race adolescents with teens of a single race using a large nationally representative sample.

    When first reported in 1997, Add Health showed that strong and supportive ties between parents and children helped protect adolescents against risky behaviors, including substance abuse, early sexual activity, pregnancy, emotional distress, suicide and violence.

    Feeling connected with one's school and, in some cases, one's religion also helped adolescents avoid some of the pitfalls of youth, the study showed.

    "These findings offered the parents of America a blueprint for what worked in protecting their kids from harm," Udry said. "Contrary to common assumptions, Add Health found that parents -- not just peers -- were extremely relevant to their children throughout adolescence," he said.

    Parents trying to prevent risky behaviors in children should spend time with teen-agers, talk with them, be available to them, set high standards and send clear messages about what they want their children to do and not do, Udry and his colleagues concluded.

    http://www.unc.edu/

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    Post Re: Students of mixed races report suffering more health problems

    What about that argument that mixed people have better genes because they are farther apart?
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    Post Re: Students of mixed races report suffering more health problems

    Quote Originally Posted by Imperator X
    What about that argument that mixed people have better genes because they are farther apart?
    What do you mean by "farther apart"?
    Jesus loves Jews and Muslims just the way they are. Cthulhu thinks they need ketchup.

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    Post Re: Students of mixed races report suffering more health problems

    genetically distant, so there's less chance of genetic disease.


    i believe the health problems are mainly psychological, stemming from mainly from issues relating to self-identity.

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    Mixed Races and Health Problems

    Students of mixed races report suffering more health problems

    By DAVID WILLIAMSON
    UNC News Services

    CHAPEL HILL -- A new study that involved surveying 90,000 adolescent U.S. students showed that those who considered themselves to be of mixed race were more likely than others to suffer from depression, substance abuse, sleep problems and various aches and pains.

    Conducted by researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and the National Institutes of Health, the investigation found that adolescents of mixed race were more likely to have other health problems as well.

    "It did not matter what races the students identified with, the risks were higher for all of them if they did not identify with a single race," said Dr. J. Richard Udry, principal author of a paper on the work appearing in the November issue of the American Journal of Public Health.

    "Most of the risk items we assessed may be related to stress, and so we believe being of mixed race is a source of stress," Udry said. "From this work, we cannot identify further the sources of that stress. More research is needed to identify those sources and possibly suggest programs that might help biracial adolescents."

    Udry is professor of maternal and child health at the UNC School of Public Health, professor of sociology in UNC’s College of Arts and Sciences and a fellow at the Carolina Population Center. His co-authors are Dr. Rose Marie Li, formerly of NIH, and Janet Hendrickson-Smith, research associate at the UNC center.

    The new findings derive from data compiled as part of the UNC-based National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, the largest and most comprehensive survey of teen-agers ever conducted in the United States.

    In the detailed surveys they completed, students could give more than one answer when asked about their race. Those who called themselves biracial tended to be more likely to smoke and drink, Udry said. Overall, older biracial children were more likely to have sex at younger ages, to have access to guns and to have poorer experiences at school such as through suspensions, skipping class and repeating grades.

    In characteristics not related to traditional risks, such as grades, vocabulary, family structure and family education, mixed-race adolescents often fell between single-race adolescents, he said. For example, Asians had higher grade-point averages than whites and were more likely to have a college-educated parent, but children with both Asian and white parents had averages between those two peer groups and were more likely to have a parent who attended college than white-only adolescents.

    "Quite a few studies attest in some way to the emotional, health and behavioral risk problems of multiracial adolescents," he said. "The most common explanation for the high-risk status is the struggle with identity formation, leading to lack of self-esteem, social isolation and problems of family dynamics in biracial households."

    Since some previous studies found no differences between biracial and single-race children, Udry and his colleagues wanted to explore the relative risk of mixed race adolescents with teens of a single race using a large nationally representative sample.

    When first reported in 1997, Add Health showed that strong and supportive ties between parents and children helped protect adolescents against risky behaviors, including substance abuse, early sexual activity, pregnancy, emotional distress, suicide and violence.

    Feeling connected with one’s school and, in some cases, one’s religion also helped adolescents avoid some of the pitfalls of youth, the study showed.

    "These findings offered the parents of America a blueprint for what worked in protecting their kids from harm," Udry said. "Contrary to common assumptions, Add Health found that parents -- not just peers -- were extremely relevant to their children throughout adolescence," he said.

    Parents trying to prevent risky behaviors in children should spend time with teen-agers, talk with them, be available to them, set high standards and send clear messages about what they want their children to do and not do, Udry and his colleagues concluded.

    The National Institute of Child Health and Human Development chiefly funded the overall Congressionally-mandated Add Health study, which also received support from nearly 20 other federal agencies ranging from the National Cancer Institute and the National Science Foundation to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

    Involved were 145 randomly selected U.S. middle and high schools. Adolescents completed questionnaires about themselves, their health and beliefs. The project’s second phase involved detailed, in-home interviews with 20,000 of the teen-agers and their parents.

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    Re: Mixed Races and Health Problems

    im sure the cultural (psychological) strains of having an interracial marrige affect the health of the children as do the genetics, but to what extent i dont know.

    awesome article!

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    Re: Mixed Races and Health Problems

    Quote Originally Posted by nätdeutsch View Post
    im sure the cultural (psychological) strains of having an interracial marrige affect the health of the children as do the genetics, but to what extent i dont know.

    awesome article!
    Children adopted by people of a different race have similar psychological issues.

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    Re: Mixed Races and Health Problems

    hmmmmmm
    what does that tell us?

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    Re: Mixed Races and Health Problems

    We're taught that it shouldn't matter what someone you love looks like, racially speaking, and that if you want children that's great (at least in my country). However, no parents think about the life of the child they are bringing into this world will be like. Think about how hard it would be to not have a set identity. To be mixed is to be confused about yourself every day. This is without the health problems. Even though I don't condone the practice of race mixing, I don't blame the product. I blame the producers.

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