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Thread: The Valknut - What Does it Mean to You?

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    Knots

    Quote Originally Posted by symmakhos
    According to Wikipedia, there is one on a 7th century stone on Gotland
    Thanks for those links; the article I read was quite strict on the form, and would not actually allow the symbol on the Tangelgarda stone to be a 'Valknut', as that one is a 'triquetra'.

    I know this may be splitting hairs, but the specific form is of three inter-locked triangles.

    The three extant examples of strict valknots are;

    an Anglo-Saxon chieftain's ring [found in the River Nene, England, and so possibly thrown there as an offering];
    the Stora Hammars stone from Labro in Gotland [features a scene of human sacrifice], and;
    the Oseberg ship, Stagen, Norway [burial of Queen Asa - valknut carved on death-bed].

    As aforesaid, these three are from the period 0700-800 AD.

    They all relate to death.

    At this time, the European controversies over the Christian Holy Trinity were still fresh. The Germanic conquerours of the fifth century had adopted anti-trinitary Arianism ...Perhaps the trinity or the number three as a magic symbol may have received good press also in the pagan world after the hegemonic consolidation of the Nicene Catholic church.
    Fascinating suggestion - thanks!

    Quote Originally Posted by Suut
    The valknut (Old Norse: valr, slain warriors + knut, knot) and the "nine worlds" thesis has always seemed untenable to me.
    I have seen some theories which claim that victims of ritual hangings [hanging being sacred to Odin] in the Viking period have nooses which are tied with a special triple knot which can be related to the valknut.

    However, I do wonder what the source of the symbol's name is - i.e., when and where it was first called a 'death-knot'?

    Perhaps you are right to imply that such meanings - including the 'nine worlds' have been retrospectively imputed to the symbol.

    One will notice that there are actually 7 triangles in total... surrounding the center triangle ... there is a three-armed swastika/sauwistika...
    Superb observations Suut, thank you.

    It also helps to think of it along the lines of a Venn diagram, of sorts.
    This may actually relate it to a depiction of Nine Worlds, though.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Venn_diagram



    Quote Originally Posted by Arthur-Robin
    9:- cats, months pregnancy, worlds/trees, nights Odin, steps Thor,
    While 9 is obviously very important in the Northern Tradition [as is 'eight', with the runes being in 'aettir', just as were the Viking armies so grouped], 7 is less so.

    As Suut points out, the Valknut makes 7 triangles in all [counting the very smallest triangle in the very centre of the symbol].
    We cannot take this to be accidental.

    I can only think of the 7 planets as having significance here [unless I am missing something obvious] - any other ideas for the significance of 7 within the Northern Tradition?

    Quote Originally Posted by thehangedone
    There are nine norse worlds. on the norman tapestry it shows Odin Thor and Frey. It can be a bindrune of course.
    I like that suggestion of a bind-rune!

    Never thought of that: it could simply be a binding of three (stylised) Uruz runes [resembling triangles], emphasising the meaning of urd/wyrd.

    The three triangles could represent the three Nornir [or the Wyrd Sisters, fate]; Urd, Verdandi and Skuld.



    Knots

    Given that the Valknut appears in the Viking era, we might observe that a seafaring people would be adept at tying knots.
    Seafarers evolve a whole culture of different types of knots.
    http://www.neropes.com/pleasure_marine/knots.html


    This would be allied to the concepts of binding and unbinding found in Norse culture [Fenris wolf etc.]

    Therefore, as aforementioned, the valknut could refer [mundanely] to the type of rope-knot used in hanging victims by the neck, sometimes referred to as the deathknot or hangman's knot.
    http://www.answers.com/topic/hangman-s-knot

    It could also relate to the later Vehmgericht whose knife was engraved with the initials of the words stone, rope, grass, green. Guido von List claims that these were originally engraved in runes.


    Tollund Man - note rope around neck.

    Symbolism of Knots: "Ambivalent since all powers of binding also imply those of loosing, of restraining but also uniting; the harder it is pulled, the firmer it becomes & the greater the union.
    Knots also represent continuity, connection, a covenant; a link;
    Fate; that which binds man to his destiny; determinism; the inescapable.
    Knots can also be the instrument of the magician in which case the tying of knots is the power & weaving of spells".
    [Encyclopedia of Symbolism, Cooper]

    That latter certainly applies to Odin and would seem to make the Valknut firmly His.

    "Knots can be apotropaic [i.e., having power to avert evil influence or bad luck]. Loosening knots is freedom; salvation; the solving of problems. Cutting a knot denotes the taking of the short, steep path to salvation & realisation ... In Witchcraft the knot symbolises Obstruction; 'hitches'; ill-wishing".

    Again, this negative aspect certainly is part of the Odinist outlook;

    "To wear a Valknutr is to make the conscious decision to join Odin in the mighty battle of consciousness over the Thurs forces ... the wearing of the Knot is something not to be lightly done ..."
    [Valgard in Runa #5]


    The Nine Worlds

    Quote Originally Posted by Arthur-Robin
    There are actually 10 not 9 worlds/trees implied/infered in Edda which match the 9/10 avataras of Vishnu, and poss Chinese 10 suns, and poss Egyptian 9/10 bows/arcs of world.
    Odin, Vili, Ve.
    Harr, Janfar, Thrud.
    Odin, Frey, Thor.
    Jarl, Karl, Thrall.
    Istaevon, Ingaevon, Hermion.
    Odin, Hoenir, Loder.
    Urd, Verdandi, Skuld.
    Man, Maid, Frost Giant.
    Fenrir, Midgardsorm, Hel.


    Interesting, although the Eddas do clearly state that there are 9 (nine) worlds, or "abodes";

    "Nine worlds I know, the nine abodes
    Of the glorious world-tree the ground beneath".

    [Voluspa, from stanza 2]


    To be fair, the translator of the above [Lee Hollander] states in a note to this stanza that "it is not clear to what 'the nine abodes' refers".

    However, Edred Thorsson is fairly clear on what he thinks these 'nine abodes' are [and many writers on the subject agree with him];

    "The Eddas teach us that ... the multiverse consisted of nine worlds, contained in & supported by the world-tree Yggdrasil.
    These worlds, contain countless abodes & dwellings.
    In the centre is Midgardhr, with the other worlds arranged around, above & below it.
    In the north is Nifelheimr; in the east, Jotunheimr; in the south, Muspellheimr; in the west Vanaheimr.
    In the middle, above Midgardhr, is Ljossalfheimr & above that Asgardhr, the enclosure of the Aesir, which houses many dwellings.
    Below Midgardhr is Svartalfheimr & below that, Hel, the silent, still & sleepy realm of the dead".
    [Futhark, Edred, page 72]


    So to list the 9 worlds;

    1) Ljossalfheimr: The World of the Light Elves

    2) Muspellsheimr: The World of Fire

    3) Asgardhr: The Enclosure of the Aesir Gods

    4) Vanaheimr: The World of the Vanir Gods

    5) Midgardhr: The Middle Enclosure [of man]

    6) Jotunheimr: The World of the Giants

    7) Svartalfheimr: The World of the Black Elves

    8) Helheimr: The World of Death

    9) Niflheimr: The World of Mist


    It is said that the beings are able to traverse the 9 worlds, so the interlocked triangles of the Valknut would seem to suggest the 9 worlds, whether intentional or no.


    The Power of Seven

    Quote Originally Posted by Moody Lawless
    As Suut points out, the Valknut makes 7 triangles in all [counting the very smallest triangle in the very centre of the symbol].
    We cannot take this to be accidental.
    I can only think of the 7 planets as having significance here [unless I am missing something obvious] - any other ideas for the significance of 7 within the Northern Tradition?
    Looking at my trusty Encyclopedia of Symbols, I see some telling links;

    "Magic: There are seven knots in a cord for spellbinding, & incantations are sevenfold".
    [Encyclopedia of Symbolism, Cooper]

    This is very important; seven knots, and we have seven triangles in the Val-knot!
    And 'spellbinding' - the references to spells of binding etc., abound in the Odinist mythology.
    Guido von List describes how rune-spells used to bind [i.e., paralyse] developed from the hunter's art of hypnotising an animal he sought to ensnare.
    Likewise, incanatations are used in rune-magic as supposedly practiced by Odin.

    The general symbolism of Seven:" 7 is the number of the Universe, the macrocosm. Completeness; a totality ..."
    [ib.,]

    This would make sense if the Valknut represents the whole nine worlds, while the seven triangles could relate to the seven planets as aforesaid.

    According to the general symbolism there are also: "7 cosmic stages, 7 heavens, 7 hells, 7 metals of the planets, 7 circles of the universe, 7 rays of the sun, 7 ages of man, 7 lunar divisions of the rainbow" [this could relate to Bifrost], "7 pillars of wisdom" etc., etc.,

    "The seventh ray of the sun is the path by which man passes from this world to the next. 7 was sacred to Apollo, and the cave of Mithras had 7 doors and altars & a ladder of 7 rungs depicting the 7 grades of initiation into the Mysteries".
    [ib.,]

    I have seen it said that many Germanic soldiers in the Roman army worshipped Mithras, so it is possible that there is a distant connection here.
    Why are there beings at all, & why not rather nothing?
    [Leibniz/Heidegger]

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    Re: The Valknut - what does it Mean to you?

    Quote Originally Posted by Moody Lawless
    Knots.



    This would be allied to the concepts of binding and unbinding found in Norse culture [Fenris wolf etc.]

    ... the valknut ... sometimes referred to as the deathknot or hangman's knot.

    It could also relate to the later Vehmgericht whose knife was engraved with the initials of the words stone, rope, grass, green. Guido von List claims that these were originally engraved in runes.


    Symbolism of Knots: "Ambivalent since all powers of binding also imply those of loosing, of restraining but also uniting; the harder it is pulled, the firmer it becomes & the greater the union.
    Knots also represent continuity, connection, a covenant; a link;
    Fate; that which binds man to his destiny; determinism; the inescapable.
    Knots can also be the instrument of the magician in which case the tying of knots is the power & weaving of spells".
    [Encyclopedia of Symbolism, Cooper]

    That latter certainly applies to Odin and would seem to make the Valknut firmly His.

    "Knots can be apotropaic [i.e., having power to avert evil influence or bad luck]. Loosening knots is freedom; salvation; the solving of problems. Cutting a knot denotes the taking of the short, steep path to salvation & realisation ... In Witchcraft the knot symbolises Obstruction; 'hitches'; ill-wishing".

    Again, this negative aspect certainly is part of the Odinist outlook;

    "To wear a Valknutr is to make the conscious decision to join Odin in the mighty battle of consciousness over the Thurs forces ... the wearing of the Knot is something not to be lightly done ..."
    [Valgard in Runa #5]


    The Nine Worlds


    ... the Eddas do clearly state that there are 9 (nine) worlds, or "abodes";

    "Nine worlds I know, the nine abodes
    Of the glorious world-tree the ground beneath".
    [Voluspa, from stanza 2]


    To be fair, the translator of the above [Lee Hollander] states in a note to this stanza that "it is not clear to what 'the nine abodes' refers".

    However, Edred Thorsson is fairly clear on what he thinks these 'nine abodes' are [and many writers on the subject agree with him];

    "The Eddas teach us that ... the multiverse consisted of nine worlds, contained in & supported by the world-tree Yggdrasil.
    These worlds, contain countless abodes & dwellings.
    In the centre is Midgardhr, with the other worlds arranged around, above & below it.
    In the north is Nifelheimr; in the east, Jotunheimr; in the south, Muspellheimr; in the west Vanaheimr.
    In the middle, above Midgardhr, is Ljossalfheimr & above that Asgardhr, the enclosure of the Aesir, which houses many dwellings.
    Below Midgardhr is Svartalfheimr & below that, Hel, the silent, still & sleepy realm of the dead".
    [Futhark, Edred, page 72]


    So to list the 9 worlds;

    1) Ljossalfheimr: The World of the Light Elves

    2) Muspellsheimr: The World of Fire

    3) Asgardhr: The Enclosure of the Aesir Gods

    4) Vanaheimr: The World of the Vanir Gods

    5) Midgardhr: The Middle Enclosure [of man]

    6) Jotunheimr: The World of the Giants

    7) Svartalfheimr: The World of the Black Elves

    8) Helheimr: The World of Death

    9) Niflheimr: The World of Mist


    It is said that the beings are able to traverse the 9 worlds, so the interlocked triangles of the Valknut would seem to suggest the 9 worlds, whether intentional or no.


    The Power of Seven



    Looking at my trusty Encyclopedia of Symbols, I see some telling links;

    "Magic: There are seven knots in a cord for spellbinding, & incantations are sevenfold".
    [Encyclopedia of Symbolism, Cooper]

    This is very important; seven knots, and we have seven triangles in the Val-knot!
    And 'spellbinding' - the references to spells of binding etc., abound in the Odinist mythology.
    Guido von List describes how rune-spells used to bind [i.e., paralyse] developed from the hunter's art of hypnotising an animal he sought to ensnare.
    Likewise, incanatations are used in rune-magic as supposedly practiced by Odin.

    The general symbolism of Seven:" 7 is the number of the Universe, the macrocosm. Completeness; a totality ..."
    [ib.,]

    ...

    According to the general symbolism there are also: "7 cosmic stages, 7 heavens, 7 hells, 7 metals of the planets, 7 circles of the universe, 7 rays of the sun, 7 ages of man, 7 lunar divisions of the rainbow" [this could relate to Bifrost], "7 pillars of wisdom" etc., etc.,

    "The seventh ray of the sun is the path by which man passes from this world to the next. 7 was sacred to Apollo, and the cave of Mithras had 7 doors and altars & a ladder of 7 rungs depicting the 7 grades of initiation into the Mysteries".
    [ib.,]

    I have seen it said that many Germanic soldiers in the Roman army worshipped Mithras, so it is possible that there is a distant connection here.
    chance n.
      1. The unknown and unpredictable element in happenings that seems to have no assignable cause.
      2. A force assumed to cause events that cannot be foreseen or controlled; luck: Chance will determine the outcome.
    1. The likelihood of something happening; possibility or probability. Often used in the plural: Chances are good that you will win. Is there any chance of rain?
    2. An accidental or unpredictable event.
    3. A favorable set of circumstances; an opportunity: a chance to escape.
    4. A risk or hazard; a gamble: took a chance that the ice would hold me.
    5. Games. A raffle or lottery ticket.
    adj.
    Caused by or ascribable to chance; unexpected, random, or casual: a chance encounter; a chance result.
    v. chanced, chanc·ing, chanc·es
    v. intr.
    To come about by chance; occur: It chanced that the train was late that day.
    v. tr.
    To take the risk or hazard of: not willing to chance it.
    Phrasal Verb:
    chance on or upon
    To find or meet accidentally; happen upon: While in Paris we chanced on two old friends.
    Idioms:
    by chance
    1. Without plan; accidentally: They met by chance on a plane.
    2. Possibly; perchance: Is he, by chance, her brother?
    on the off chance
    In the slight hope or possibility.

    [Middle English, unexpected event, from Old French, from Vulgar Latin *cadentia, from Latin cadns, cadent- present participle of cadere, to fall, befall. See kad- in Aryan Roots.]

    Synonyms: chance, random, casual, haphazard, desultory
    These adjectives apply to what is determined not by deliberation but by accident. Chance stresses lack of premeditation: a chance meeting with a friend. Random implies the absence of a specific pattern or objective: took a random guess. Casual often suggests an absence of due concern: a casual observation. Haphazard implies a carelessness or a willful leaving to chance: a haphazard plan of action. Desultory suggests a shifting about from one thing to another that reflects a lack of method: a desultory conversation.

    fate n.

    1: an event (or a course of events) that will inevitably happen in the future [syn: destiny]

    2: the ultimate agency that predetermines the course of events (often personified as a woman); "we are helpless in the face of Destiny" [syn: Destiny, Fate]

    3: your overall circumstances or condition in life (including everything that happens to you); "whatever my fortune may be"; "deserved a better fate"; "has a happy lot"; "the luck of the Irish"; "a victim of circumstances"; "success that was her portion" [syn: fortune, destiny, luck, lot, circumstances, portion] v : decree or designate beforehand; "She was destined to become a great pianist" [syn: destine, doom, designate]

    Citat Moody: The general symbolism of Seven:" 7 is the number of the Universe, the macrocosm. Completeness; a totality ..."

    Any totality would, necessarily, contain/posess its apparent opposite. With seven, we therefore have a union of antipodal cosmological aspects: the center triangle itself representing the union.

    Can one know one's "fate"? Can one know if one's life is predetermined by condition, or by "chance"? With each bound together as indeterminates, one must affect, or hope to affect, the caprice of the gods via valr (etiological cousin to "valour": Middle English valour, from Old French, from Late Latin valor, from Latin valre, to be strong. See wal- in Aryan Roots.)

    Macroscopically: we have, to my mind, identified the two 'aspects' of the one cosmological mystery; or, the mystery of competing forces, or, quanta of energies acting from within and without.

    Free will. Determinism. Choice (or, and at the least, a very convincing illusion of) remains in the now.

    We must remember: Odin gave only one eye!--this is necessarily cryptic.

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Suut
    The valknut (Old Norse: valr, slain warriors + knut, knot) and the "nine worlds" thesis has always seemed untenable to me.

    I should qualify this.

    My family (matrilineally) has had in its posession a tweed quilt for over 1100 years. Inlaied upon this quilt is the Valknut (in strict form; although the points of overlap are reversed, and the center triangle is blackened...); itself surrounded by select Runes.

    Some of my earliest memories are of my mother and her sister refering to the "nine aspects" of Yggdrasil. I never heard the word "worlds" in their conversations. Conversations with my mother about our tradition began when I was around four years of age...

    Citat Moody: The three extant examples of strict valknots...all relate to death.


    ...our Valknut quilt was the reserved death-shroud of of my distantly great-grandfather. It was hidden away prior to the dominion of the Nicene creed, as such artifacts were typically confiscated during Christian imposition; handed down generation to generation, it remains in my family to this day. There are other families in posession of Valknut artefactum: it was often imprinted upon mirrors or reflective surfaces.

    SUUT: One will notice that there are actually 7 triangles in total. This leaves a single remainder: that of chance. Therefore, the prepared warrior can prepare for all but one cosmological aspect: the center triangle of chance from which the mystery radiates; and the 6 'exterior' triangles of preparedness which gravitate to chance as anchor.

    It's hard to see, especially if one is not all that spacially inclined, but surrounding the center triangle (in this particular depiction, which I have always thought the most proper) there is a three-armed swastika/sauwistika...

    It also helps to think of it along the lines of a Venn diagram, of sorts.

    The number 6 (the importance of 7 having now been dealt with) is of dramatic import to the Valknut. Relating to the Venn diagram, the individual (when understood microscopically/subjectively) inputs his own 'aspects' or 'choices' surrounding chance/fate and adheres to them. He is indeed bound to the carved character (relating to the swastika/sauwistika). The importance of 6 aspects is easily enough discovered.

    My mother, after a long bout with crippling arthritis and heart disease, died on April the 7th, 1999. On her death bed, she asked my youngest brother to bring her the Valknut quilt. He went to the chest it which it is kept, brought it back, and handed it to my mother. She ran her fingers over the drapped fabric--gently, as if she was speaking to and through it with the tips of her fingers. She traced the Valknut with her finger, and stopped at the centre. She said the following: "My sons, my dearest boys: in the end--this--gets us all. But for now, you worry about having character." She ran her index finger, clockwise, through each Valknut wedge, moving from the left and most bottom, then to the right and middle, then to the left and most high triangle. She passed 9 minutes later.

    "...The moral man is a lower species than the immoral, a weaker species; indeed - he is a type in regard to morality, but not a type in himself; a copy...the measure of his value lies outside him. ... I assess the power of a will by how much resistance, pain, torture it endures and knows how to turn to its advantage; I do not account the evil and painful character of existence a reproach to it, but hope rather that it will one day be more evil and painful than hitherto..." (Nietzsche)

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    Re: The Valknut - what does it Mean to you?

    Does the binding and loosing perhaps relate to Fenrir?
    Could valknut be related to walnut???
    Perhaps 3 mountains (as in Indian; 3 Pyramids)?
    Labyrinth/maze?
    Gordian knot?
    9 planets?
    7 may not be impt in Norse/Germanic myth but it is in global (holistic) myth.
    Numbers are often rounded-off in myth eg 10=12, 70=72, 40=42, 100=120. 8 is often related to 7.
    7 is perfection in Judaeo-Xtian (7 vs 6) but 8 speaks of new creation (8 vs 7).
    I once read in Balder zine In Celt there are 3 worlds Upper, Mundane, Under plus 4th area Mide where they all meet. Mide ~ Midgard, (Tara ~ Troja).
    Add 10 sephiroth to my list of 10 worlds/trees, avataras, suns, bows/arcs.
    Cave of Mithras = tomb &/or stable of Jesus.
    It is true that 9 worlds majorly figure in Norse/German myth but quote "9 worlds I remember, 9 trees of life, before this world tree grew from the ground." This matches 9/10 avataras and poss 9/10 bows/arcs and also 10 parts/divs of world/age in some versions 2 Esdras 14:11-12 which incidentally also says 9 have passed/currently in 2nd half of 10th.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Arthur-Robin
    Does the binding and loosing perhaps relate to Fenrir?
    Could valknut be related to walnut???
    To the former most definitely; to the latter no, although thanks for bringing it up as it forced me to look at the meaning of the word;

    Walnut: Old English wahlnut, literally 'foreign-nut', from wealh, "foreign" [see 'Welsh'] ... so called because it was introduced from Gaul & Italy, distinguishing itself from the native hazel nut ...
    http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?...earchmode=none
    http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/walnut
    Fascinating, anyways - demonstrating the kind of mentality that we seek.


    Perhaps 3 mountains (as in Indian; 3 Pyramids)?
    Labyrinth/maze?
    Brilliant suggestions - thanks!

    It is true that 9 worlds majorly figure in Norse/German myth but quote "9 worlds I remember, 9 trees of life, before this world tree grew from the ground." This matches 9/10 avataras and poss 9/10 bows/arcs and also 10 parts/divs of world/age in some versions 2 Esdras 14:11-12 which incidentally also says 9 have passed/currently in 2nd half of 10th.
    Thanks for clarifying that.

    Quote Originally Posted by Suut View Post
    chance n.

    1. The unknown and unpredictable element in happenings that seems to have no assignable cause.
    2. A force assumed to cause events that cannot be foreseen or controlled; luck.
    "No Conqueror believes in Chance".
    [Nietzsche, GS 258]

    Everything is charged with meaning - even the smallest event is crucial to the Now.

    Divination ['to make divine'] entails the search for meaning behind so-called "chance events".
    http://www.llewellynencyclopedia.com/term/Divination

    In my world there are no 'chance events'.

    The toss of the Runes and their upshot is as much part of this world of meaning and its web of wyrd as anything else.

    This is how we are able to Read the Runes.
    Last edited by Moody; Saturday, August 19th, 2006 at 06:17 PM.
    Why are there beings at all, & why not rather nothing?
    [Leibniz/Heidegger]

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    Re: Chance & Divination

    Quote Originally Posted by Moody Lawless View Post
    "No Conqueror believes in Chance".
    [Nietzsche, GS 258]

    Everything is charged with meaning - even the smallest event is crucial to the Now.

    Divination ['to make divine'] entails the search for meaning behind so-called "chance events".
    http://www.llewellynencyclopedia.com/term/Divination

    In my world there are no 'chance events'.

    The toss of the Runes and their upshot is as much part of this world of meaning and its web of wyrd as anything else.

    This is how we are able to Read the Runes.
    You choose to battle Giants, then. Excellent choice. I hope you take humility with you into Jotunheimr.


    However, (G)od may not be too fond of dice;

    but the gods sure are.

    At their caprice, of course.

    "No one knows, really."

    Last edited by SuuT; Friday, August 11th, 2006 at 09:11 PM. Reason: added picture
    "...The moral man is a lower species than the immoral, a weaker species; indeed - he is a type in regard to morality, but not a type in himself; a copy...the measure of his value lies outside him. ... I assess the power of a will by how much resistance, pain, torture it endures and knows how to turn to its advantage; I do not account the evil and painful character of existence a reproach to it, but hope rather that it will one day be more evil and painful than hitherto..." (Nietzsche)

  6. #16
    Senior Member Fenris's Avatar
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    Re: Chance & Divination

    This is a fascinating read, I've never seen the Valknutr discussed so thoroughly and the meanings and symbolism carefully dissected quite so completely as I have in this very thread.

    Thank you all.
    A rebirth is coming, the Thulean Phoenix shall arise from the ashes of the Third Reich, empowered and inflamed by the wrongs levied against our people since the fall of German National Socialism. Prepare yourselves, Folk of Thule, our time is nigh.

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    Re: The Valknut - what does it Mean to you?

    an Anglo-Saxon chieftain's ring [found in the River Nene, England, and so possibly thrown there as an offering]
    Moody, could you cite a reference of this for me? Web-searches turn up nothing (except this thread)

  8. #18
    Witukind
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    Re: The Valknut - what does it Mean to you?

    As far as I know, the Valknut is a sign of Odin's warriors. The word apparently means "knot of the slain".

    See wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Valknut

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    Re: The Valknut - what does it Mean to you?

    Quote Originally Posted by Witukind View Post
    As far as I know, the Valknut is a sign of Odin's warriors. The word apparently means "knot of the slain".

    See wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Valknut
    Though as far as I know, the name is unattested historically. Unlike things like; http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blood_eagle

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    Re: The Valknut - what does it Mean to you?

    The Valnut is simple.

    It represents God in its triad aspect.

    Odin/Mind/Ur
    Villi/Will/Energy/Thunar
    Ve/Holiness/Ariomanus/Frey

    One who has manifested these forms to the fullest extent, it fully incarnate God.

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