Page 1 of 15 12345611 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 147

Thread: The Amish & Pennsylvania Dutch/Germans

  1. #1
    Senior Member Götterschicksal's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Last Online
    Monday, September 15th, 2003 @ 07:10 AM
    Location
    Österreich
    Gender
    Occupation
    Student
    Politics
    Europäer
    Posts
    135
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    0
    Thanked in
    0 Posts

    Post The Amish & Pennsylvania Dutch/Germans

    How did this misnomer come about? There are several theories:

    1. In the 15th and 16th centuries, the English referred to all people of germanic heritage as Dutch or Dutchmen regardless of whether they came from the Netherlands or from lands now known as Germany. If differentiated, however, they were referred to by the English as the Low Dutch (Low German) for the Netherlanders and the High Dutch (High German) for the Germans and German speaking Swiss, referring to the elevation of their native lands.

    However, after the United Provinces (the Netherlands) became an independent state, and competition and even wars developed between England and the Netherlands, the English language terms for these two people began to diverge such that by the 17th century the Netherlanders were referred to as the Dutch and the people from areas now in Germany where referred to as Germans. Thus, some theorize that the phrase Pennsylvania Dutch is a linguistic carry over from the earlier, broader usage of the word Dutch.

    2. The German word for German is "Deutsch". Thus, if a person described themselves as a Pennsylvania "Deutschman", he meant Pennsylvania German. Thus, recent generations of English speaking people in the United States, corrupted the pronuncation and spelling to Pennsylvania "Dutchman".

    3. The Dutch predominantly settled in New Amsterdam (now New York). The Germans predominantly settled in southeastern Pennsylvania, in the inland counties of Northampton, Berks, Lancaster, Lehigh, Montgomery, Bucks, and others. Some very early Palatine German refugees were settled in New York by the British. However, most of these eventually migrated overland to
    Pennsylvania where William Penn offered religious freedom and better treatment. The languages sound similar to the untrained ear. Because of similarities in the sound of the language, some people theorize that the Pennsylvania Germans were called Pennsylvania Dutch by the English to differentiate them geographically from the similar sounding New York Dutch.

    4. Most of the German immigrants sailed to Pennsylvania from Dutch ports, such as Rotterdam and Amsterdam in Holland, after coming down the Rhine River from Germany. Thus, English speaking people may have confused them as being Dutch because the ship lists reported they embarked for the new world from Dutch ports. Thus, some people may have incorrectly thought these Palatine Germans and other German speaking people were Dutch.

    5. Dutch Reformed congregations in New York and Holland provided financial and spiritual assistance to the early German Reformed
    congregations in Pennsylvania due to their shared spiritual beliefs. Dutch ministers, who were also fluent in German, preached to the early PA German settlers in order to insure the Reformed faith was nurtured and grew in the early settlements until such time as the German Reformed Church was solidly established. With the Dutch church heavily involved with the early settlers, this could have further confused the true heritage of these early German speaking settlers as viewed by the English speaking settlers.



    "Pennsylvania Dutch "

    Unsah Faddah im Himmel,
    dei nohma loss heilich sei.
    Dei Reich loss kumma.
    Dei villa loss gedu sei,
    uf di eaht vi im Himmel.
    Unsah tayklich broht gebb uns heit.
    Un fagebb unsah shulda,
    vi miah dee fagevva vo uns shuldich sinn.
    Un fiah uns naett in di fasuchung,
    avvah hald uns fu'm eevila.
    Fa dei is es Reich, di graft, un di hallichkeit in ayvichkeit. Amen.
    Last edited by Götterschicksal; Thursday, August 7th, 2003 at 02:51 PM.
    „Sollten Sie dabei sein, wenn ich sterbe, so werden Sie sehen, dass ich ruhig dahinscheide; denn ich glaube, dass nach dem Tode alles zu Ende ist.”
    Friedrich der Große

  2. #2
    . "Friend of Germanics"
    Skadi Funding Member



    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Last Online
    @
    Status
    Available
    Ethnicity
    .
    Gender
    Age
    54
    Religion
    +
    Posts
    845
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    11
    Thanked in
    11 Posts

    Post The PA "Dutch"

    This is a topic near and dear to my heart, since I am Pennsylvania "Dutch/Deutsch" down my paternal line.

    All the points above discuss this topic very well.

    The simple fact of the matter is: there are VERY FEW folks in North America of Nederlander descent. "New Amsterdam/New York" really was the hub of Nederlander-Americanism. Beyond that colony, there were FEW others in the orginal American colonies of Nederlander heritage. There are VERY FEW folks here in the U. S. today that can claim Nederlander colonial heritage.

    One must understand that most of the immigrants to the original 13 British colonies on the eastern coast of what is now called the U. S. were poor, illiterate, and uneducated. This was true of ALL ethnic groups that came here. So, there were illiterate Englishmen (of course) in the colonies dealing with equally illiterate European continentals from destinations including the "German"-speaking areas. These were the days BEFORE such "socialistic" concepts of "public-education," etc. So, back in those days here there were fairly ignorant English-speakers dealing on an everyday basis with fairly ignorant "German"-speakers...so, what came out of it in Pennsylvania?!?! The label of the: "Pennsylvania Dutch." :-)

    Anyone here in the U.S. who is of "PA Dutch" heritage (like me) KNOWS!!! that the label REALLY means: "Pennsylvania DEUTSCH!" lol ;-) So, for those of us who KNOW better! (typically "German-Americans") we know what it means, but for those who are NOT "German-American" it is until this day a TRICKY thing that not everyone on this side of the ocean understands...for MANY it still means NEDERLANDER/"Dutch" and NOT GERMAN/DEUTSCH!

    Btw, from what I know, MOST "PA DEUTSCH" folks are of HOCHDEUTSCH (as are mine) heritage and this is because most "PA Deut." are Protestant (esp. Lutheran)-"German" who were in the 1600-1700s driven from the predominantly Catholic-German areas.

    I do find it interesting, as a native English-speaker that "Dutch" has come to mean in modern English "Nederlander" and "German" has come to me "Deutsch." In my mind "Dutch" is merely an English corruption of the TRUE "Deutsch," so as far as I'm concerned "Dutch"="Deutsch"="GERMAN." And the "Nederlanders" are IN-BETWEEN being "English"+"Deutsch!" LOL

    As for this issue of whether or not the ancient "Germanni" were "Germanic" or "Celtic" is beyond the scope of this post!!!! LOL :-))) Nevertheless, the English folk as some point LONG AGO decided to apply this term to the "Deutsch!" LOL

    Oh, btw, additionally, terms such as "Dutch"; "Deutsch"; et al. are all ultimately derived from "THIUDA!" which is merely and old (ancient) Gothic term meaning "FOLK!" or to be more Latin-like "people!" So, e.g., such modern deutsch phrasologies such as "das deutsche Volk" ("the folk folk") are redundancies! ;-)

    GOD-BLESS my kinfolk in the "PA-DEUTSCH"!!!!!! Any of you that might happen to come across this post!!!! LOL OOO

  3. #3
    Funding Member
    "Friend of Germanics"
    Skadi Funding Member


    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Last Online
    @
    Ethnicity
    Germanic
    Country
    United Kingdom United Kingdom
    State
    Essex Essex
    Gender
    Politics
    Putinism
    Posts
    5,207
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    7
    Thanked in
    7 Posts

    Post

    Welcome to Skadi Forum, Suomut2_13!

    Thanks for the interesting picures you posted on the Anglo-Saxon thread. This issue about the Pennsylvania "Dutch" is also a must read!

    Regards,

    Loki


  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Last Online
    Sunday, February 25th, 2007 @ 11:29 AM
    Subrace
    nordiſch-weſtiſch
    Location
    Deutſchland
    Gender
    Family
    Single
    Politics
    Volk und Raſſe
    Posts
    1,621
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    6
    Thanked in
    6 Posts

    Post

    Quote Originally Posted by Suomut2_13
    I do find it interesting, as a native English-speaker that "Dutch" has come to mean in modern English "Nederlander" and "German" has come to me "Deutsch." In my mind "Dutch" is merely an English corruption of the TRUE "Deutsch," so as far as I'm concerned "Dutch"="Deutsch"="GERMAN." And the "Nederlanders" are IN-BETWEEN being "English"+"Deutsch!" LOL
    When the Lower-German tribe of the Netherlanders slightly began to seperate out of the German Volk in the early modern times in political, cultural, national-mental and in language (with the Lower-German dialect of Netherlandish character becoming an own high language) respects, they got the word "deutsch" (dutch) "reserved" for them in the English language, while for the Volk in Deutschland (now without the Netherlands), the antique "Germans" were digged out again.

    Interesting is that now, with the modern Volk in Deutschland called "Germans", the antique Germans (in German: Germanen) in English are often called "Teutons" - a very incorrect term that should be avoided, because the Teutons (in German: Teutonen) in a the true, narrow sense were only one Germanic tribe that went to the South in the second century B. C. and then was defeated and mostly exterminated by the Romans. One should drop the word "Teutons" for the Germanics as a whole and only use "Germanics" - it's only a cause for misunderstandings (for example in German books translated from English one often reads stuff like that Himmler and the SS worshipped to the Teutonen or that the Nazis loved the teutonische Rasse. - At best in the Third Reich one spoke of Germanen and a germanische Rasse).

    My question: Was the word "German" already used in English for the modern Germans, e g. in the Medieval Age (if there are non-Latin texts where the Germans are mentioned) or also in the very early modern times, before the the Netherlands seperated and "took with them" the word "Dutch"?
    Man ſei Held oder Heiliger. In der Mitte liegt nicht die Weisheit, ſondern die Alltäglichkeit.

    SPENGLER

  5. #5
    ...................
    "Friend of Germanics"
    Skadi Funding Member

    Allenson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Last Online
    Thursday, October 19th, 2017 @ 11:51 AM
    Ethnicity
    New English
    State
    Vermont Vermont
    Location
    Bliss Farm
    Gender
    Occupation
    Smuggler
    Politics
    Ruralist
    Religion
    Old Mother West Wind
    Posts
    3,908
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    19
    Thanked in
    19 Posts

    Post

    Quote Originally Posted by Suomut2_13
    The simple fact of the matter is: there are VERY FEW folks in North America of Nederlander descent. "New Amsterdam/New York" really was the hub of Nederlander-Americanism. Beyond that colony, there were FEW others in the orginal American colonies of Nederlander heritage. There are VERY FEW folks here in the U. S. today that can claim Nederlander colonial heritage.
    I am one of those few. I am largely of 'New Netherlands' Dutch ancestry (50% or so...some from both maternal and paternal sides). My family has lived in the hills above the Hudson for over 300 years now. Here's a map showing the distribution of Dutch descended folk in the US


    http://www.mnplan.state.mn.us/maps/a...y/us/dutch.gif

  6. #6
    . "Friend of Germanics"
    Skadi Funding Member



    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Last Online
    @
    Status
    Available
    Ethnicity
    .
    Gender
    Age
    54
    Religion
    +
    Posts
    845
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    11
    Thanked in
    11 Posts

    Post

    Quote Originally Posted by Allenson
    I am one of those few. I am largely of 'New Netherlands' Dutch ancestry (50% or so...some from both maternal and paternal sides). My family has lived in the hills above the Hudson for over 300 years now. Here's a map showing the distribution of Dutch descended folk in the US


    http://www.mnplan.state.mn.us/maps/a...y/us/dutch.gif
    Hey Dalonord,

    I have to say I'm always astonished to find Nederlander-Americans! I met a gal a few weeks back that's paternally Nederlander from the New Amsterdam Colony. U "Dutch" folks are unique here and you all KNOW IT TOO!!!! LOL ;-))) Good spirit, I like it! =)

    As for the URL/map you provide, I took conspicuous notice of certain counties in the South that I am WELL!!!!!!!!! familiar with that have virtually no Nederlander populations but are overwhelmingly "German" i.e. non-Nederlander. So, it appears obvious to me that this map is inaccurate to a certain extent with a certain % of reportees who are really "German" reporting themselves (perhaps out of ignorance) as "Dutch/Nederlander." But, it's based on the census and we have to go by what the citizens report don't we?--regardless, of how genuine and true the reports are.

    Quote Originally Posted by Nordgau
    When the Lower-German tribe of the Netherlanders slightly began to seperate out of the German Volk in the early modern times in political, cultural, national-mental and in language (with the Lower-German dialect of Netherlandish character becoming an own high language) respects, they got the word "deutsch" (dutch) "reserved" for them in the English language, while for the Volk in Deutschland (now without the Netherlands), the antique "Germans" were digged out again.


    I personally wouldn't call Netherlanders a "tribe," since I'm inclined to reserve this for the ancients, but I know what you mean. In my mind, modern Netherlanders/Nederlanders are an "ethnicity" or a "genetic nation."

    Quote Originally Posted by Nordgau
    Interesting is that now, with the modern Volk in Deutschland called "Germans", the antique Germans (in German: Germanen) in English are often called "Teutons" - a very incorrect term that should be avoided, because the Teutons (in German: Teutonen) in a the true, narrow sense were only one Germanic tribe that went to the South in the second century B. C. and then was defeated and mostly exterminated by the Romans. One should drop the word "Teutons" for the Germanics as a whole and only use "Germanics" - it's only a cause for misunderstandings (for example in German books translated from English one often reads stuff like that Himmler and the SS worshipped to the Teutonen or that the Nazis loved the teutonische Rasse. - At best in the Third Reich one spoke of Germanen and a germanische Rasse).


    Actually, it seems to me the use of the term "German(-ic)" was probably first instigated by the English intellegensia at some point in the late-middle ages. Also, the term "Teuton(-ic)" probably has a similar history in the English tongue. Today, in English both terms are used to refer to "deutschers" the former FAR MORE than the latter.

    Originally, both the Germanni and the Teutonni were singular, individual tribes. As for the Germanni, I've never been able to find much information on this obsure tribe. They were either "Germanic" or "Celtic" (to use our modern understandings of these terms). A prominent member of this site stated one time via another forum that that term "Germanni" had some kind of meaning (I'm sorry I forgot what it was) in the ancient Celtic/Gaelic tongues, but I never bought that idea much (I wanted to see the PROOF for it!) since I've long thought that given the tribe's name which includes the "-manni" suffix which is a nearly SURE sign for me this tribe was "Germanic" since several of the old folk tribes liked to name themselves after the "Germanic" demigod "Mannus." I mean NO BODY debates as to whether or not the ALEMANNI!!!! (like those of us with Swiss and Swabian blood) were "Germanic!" Of course they were as the "GERMANNI" in all probablity. The problem with the Germanni is that to my knowledge no one knows where they ended up in history. They are an enigma. Now to the Teutonni...-v

    From my readings of Plutarch, it's not like ALL the Teutonni, Cimbri, and Ambrones left the ancient "Cimbric" Peninsula (Denmark)! Let's leave a little room for the possiblity that SOME/MANY/MOST stayed behind. But who knows. Think for a moment, though, did ALL! the "Angles" leave Angeln for the British Isles? No. Did ALL! the Goths leave "Gotland" for the mainland to the south? No. Etc., etc. So, in my mind there is no problem for ANYONE of "Germanic" heritage calling themselves "Teuton" a "Cimbrian" or an "Ambrone"...esp. those who have heritage from Denmark south into Northern Italy since these were the essential tracings of these tribes.

    As for the N. S. problems in modern Deutschland in regard to these terminologies you understand them better than I do. I can't comment.

    Quote Originally Posted by Nordgau
    My question: Was the word "German" already used in English for the modern Germans, e g. in the Medieval Age (if there are non-Latin texts where the Germans are mentioned) or also in the very early modern times, before the the Netherlands seperated and "took with them" the word "Dutch"?


    Well, I did a little digging in my Anglo-Saxon dictionary along these lines. In A.S./Old English/early Medieval times there was no such a word as "German" in use. But it makes sense doesn't it that this word would not be in A.S. since there was no tribe anywhere in Europe at the time of "England's" early beginnings with the name "German(-ni)." So, as I mention above, it was probably in the latter middle-ages that the English learned classes (being knowledgable of the Classical works) brought the term "German" into being in reference to "deutschers."

    As for the terms: "Dutch"/"deutsch"/"dütsch"/ etc. the cognate to these in A.S. was šeod, meaning literally "folk/Volk." An earlier cognate to this word was the Gothic šiuda meaning precisely the same thing "folk/Volk." There never was a "Germanic" tribe in ancient times called the šiuda/šeod/dütsch/deutsch/Dutch/etc. This was (and in my mind still is) a rather generic term for folk/Volk/nation/people/etc. So, IMO, anyone of "Germanic" heritage has the right to use this term, even though it would be incredibly confusing for most "normal" persons walking the streets today. Being "deutsch" is really a nearly all-encompassing term for all "Germanic" folks whether being Lombard, Burgundian, Alleman, Swabian, Bavarian, Thuringian, Saxon, Frank, Frisian, Angle, Jute, Dane, Norse, Swedish, etc. Each of these folks have their own individual heritages and unique names, but they are all together "One Folk(Folc)/Ein Volk" OR "One šiuda/šeod/dütsch/deutsch/Dutch/etc." in a SUPER-ethnic sense.

    Here are some other šiuda/folk cognates in A.S.:
    šeod=folk
    šeodcwen=folk-queen
    šeodcyning=folk-king
    šeode=speech/language/nation
    šeodeorše=folk-earth
    šeodhere=folk-army/Volksheer
    šeodisc=speech/language
    šeodland=folk-land/district/gau
    šeodlic=folk-like/national
    šeodscipe=folk/nation/people
    šeodstefn=folk/nation

    As for the modern English-speaking world referring to the modern "German"-speaking world as "Germans," I think this should be ended. The better term in English for the modern community of "German"-speakers/ethnics should be: "the Deutschers" since since some 6 or more TRIBAL groups are being refered to. And perhaps the "Dutch" can then become in English parlance: "the Hollanders!" lol ;-)))


  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Last Online
    Sunday, February 25th, 2007 @ 11:29 AM
    Subrace
    nordiſch-weſtiſch
    Location
    Deutſchland
    Gender
    Family
    Single
    Politics
    Volk und Raſſe
    Posts
    1,621
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    6
    Thanked in
    6 Posts

    Post

    Quote Originally Posted by Suomut2_13
    I personally wouldn't call Netherlanders a "tribe," since I'm inclined to reserve this for the ancients, but I know what you mean. In my mind, modern Netherlanders/Nederlanders are an "ethnicity" or a "genetic nation."
    Yeah, you're right. In German terminology of Volkskunde, it's usual to call the even today Bavarians, Franconians, Saxonies etc. the different German Stämme. Literally that would be "tribes", but such a directly translation is junk, cause "tribe" isn't used in English for such modern ethnic populations or sub-populations.

    Quote Originally Posted by Suomut2_13
    As for the modern English-speaking world referring to the modern "German"-speaking world as "Germans," I think this should be ended. The better term in English for the modern community of "German"-speakers/ethnics should be: "the Deutschers" since since some 6 or more TRIBAL groups are being refered to. And perhaps the "Dutch" can then become in English parlance: "the Hollanders!" lol ;-)))
    As theoritical thought quite interesting, though I don't think of the practical possibility of a name changing of a whole country or people. That only really works with non-European people such as Persians/Iranians, Ceylon/Sri Lanka, Kongo/Zaire: these names aren't so common and such an important and daily thing for the English-speaking people. But the Germans as known and great and important central folk of Europe are.

    Wouldn't "Deutschers" be from its spelling to far for a common English use? How about the "Deutchers" and "Deutchland" as compromise ("eu" spoken as "oi" still isn't real English). And when the "Dutch" are forced to be "Hollanders" again, we can inherit that word again. "Dutchland" as my favourite is already free today, lol.

  8. #8
    Senior Member Götterschicksal's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Last Online
    Monday, September 15th, 2003 @ 07:10 AM
    Location
    Österreich
    Gender
    Occupation
    Student
    Politics
    Europäer
    Posts
    135
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    0
    Thanked in
    0 Posts

    Post

    Also, the term "Teuton(-ic)" probably has a similar history in the English tongue
    I posted on this before (in german) - http://www.forums.skadi.net/showthread.php?t=3621 - bottom of page.
    Last edited by Götterschicksal; Saturday, August 16th, 2003 at 07:35 PM.
    „Sollten Sie dabei sein, wenn ich sterbe, so werden Sie sehen, dass ich ruhig dahinscheide; denn ich glaube, dass nach dem Tode alles zu Ende ist.”
    Friedrich der Große

  9. #9
    . "Friend of Germanics"
    Skadi Funding Member



    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Last Online
    @
    Status
    Available
    Ethnicity
    .
    Gender
    Age
    54
    Religion
    +
    Posts
    845
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    11
    Thanked in
    11 Posts

    Post

    For any and all that might be interested I've posted a reply to this @ http://www.forums.skadi.net/showthread.php?p=37811

    Quote Originally Posted by Götterschicksal
    I posted on this before (in german) - http://www.forums.skadi.net/showthread.php?t=3621 - bottom of page.
    Quote Originally Posted by Nordgau
    As theoritical thought quite interesting, though I don't think of the practical possibility of a name changing of a whole country or people. That only really works with non-European people such as Persians/Iranians, Ceylon/Sri Lanka, Kongo/Zaire: these names aren't so common and such an important and daily thing for the English-speaking people. But the Germans as known and great and important central folk of Europe are.
    I agree. What I suggest is practically impossible, but I can DREAM can't I!??! LOL ;-) What's so bad about it is such a language change would be GOOD for the English folk (for the sake of NOT being ignorant)! But there are a lot of things that would be good for English folks but most don't care. I suppose the same can be said of most deutschers too these days, sadly.

    Quote Originally Posted by Nordgau
    Wouldn't "Deutschers" be from its spelling to far for a common English use? How about the "Deutchers" and "Deutchland" as compromise ("eu" spoken as "oi" still isn't real English). And when the "Dutch" are forced to be "Hollanders" again, we can inherit that word again. "Dutchland" as my favourite is already free today, lol.
    No, such a language change would be easy for Englishmen to do, no problem. Yeah, changing the pronunciation would be unnecessary, the SENSIBLE meaning would be there instead of troublesome wordage. Maybe if the English started calling the "Germans"-->"Deutschers" then the "Dutchmen/Hollanders/Nederlanders" might get MAD! and want the name BACK!!! LOL (I'm not holding my breath, of course ;-) IMO, they should go by FRISIANS!!!!!!!!!!!!! This is IMO, the BEST and most HONORABLE name for any, in English, "Dutchman" to go by. Frisian blood is the ONE side of the heritage of "Dutchmen" that said men have the most to be proud about. Absolutely, no "Dutchman" could ever be criticised for calling himself a Frisian first regardless of whether he was born or raised in Frisland. ;-)

  10. #10
    Member Kleinwildjaeger's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Last Online
    Friday, April 16th, 2004 @ 07:32 AM
    Subrace
    Alpinid
    Gender
    Politics
    Monarchist
    Posts
    14
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    1
    Thanked in
    1 Post

    Lightbulb The Amish

    North America has a unique population of Germans who have settled here long ago - the Amish. They are thrifty, hardworking, and have many of the traditional virtues of the Germanic races.

    Germanics living in America might consider joining the Amish. The immediate advantages are obvious; your bloodlines are pretty much assured into the next several generations, your lifestyle has very little interaction with the NWO, and it is a very healthy way of life.

    Anybody have any thoughts on this? Obviously, those of you who embrace the Norse pantheon would not fit in, but most Protestants would have little trouble adapting to the religious part.

  11. The Following User Says Thank You to Kleinwildjaeger For This Useful Post:


Page 1 of 15 12345611 ... LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 0
    Last Post: Tuesday, October 10th, 2017, 01:47 PM
  2. Replies: 0
    Last Post: Tuesday, September 2nd, 2008, 01:01 AM
  3. Folklore of the Pennsylvania Germans
    By Ulf in forum Folk Art & Culture
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: Tuesday, September 2nd, 2008, 12:59 AM
  4. Pennsylvania Dutch Cooking
    By Gefjon in forum Food & Drink
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: Sunday, December 23rd, 2007, 01:55 AM
  5. Pennsylvania Dutch Are Of German Heritage, Not Dutch.
    By Götterschicksal in forum Netherlands & Flanders
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: Monday, August 18th, 2003, 05:17 AM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •