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Thread: German: The Most Masculine Language!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Suomut2_13
    I think you may have misunderstood me. I did not say or even suggest this.
    Oh... yeah... now I see it. That comes from fast, inaccurate reading. My mistake.

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    I was only comparing German, English and Italian. Go and see the original thread. I did not start this thread! I have heard most Indo-European languages. I did not compare with Bantu languages.

    I meant that German sounds clear. I was being positive. An American southerner can also sound masculine. I do not know why you responded in the way that you did. Not that it is obvious that my statement is right. How does it matter what once native language is? Do you think I am alone in thinking that about German? That is the common belief all over Europe.

    What is wrong if it is the most masculine language? It is better than to have a effeminate voice. Is that not better than a language for wine and poetry? It might be the language of scientists and philosophers. Anyway, it is subjective and as you say, dialects differ.

    Danish (and so does Dutch, less so in Flanders) have that throating, gutteral sound. Danes understand Swedish. I had a difficulty to understand them when I was in Copenhagen. Norwegian is closer to Danish in written form. Norwegian is easier to understand than Danish if you know Swedish.

    I can also always tell when a Dutchman (sometimes Danes too) speak English. It sounds very choppy. Some Norwegians have almost RP English pronunciation. Swedes pronounce all the consonants, similar to Irishmen. The Irish accent of English from Dublin is rather clear.

    Schweizerdeutsch sound hardly German. They use subtitles when they speak that on German TV (Swiss part in the nights, I forgot which channel).

    German sounds harsh to Swedish ears. Swedish is more melodic.

    Der växte uti Hildings gård
    två plantor under fostrarns vård.
    Ej Norden förr sett två så sköna,
    de växte härligt i det gröna.

    [Esaias Tegnér, Frithiofs saga, first part of Frithiof och Ingeborg, 1825]

    Modern Swedish use "där" instead of "der".

    You can also listen to Swedish public radio:
    http://www.sr.se/

    P1 got high quality programs.




    Quote Originally Posted by Suomut2_13
    You make this BOLD! statement inspite of the likelihood that you have NOT! heard EVERY spoken language known to man! lol Volks. I can't recall what your native langauge is (sorry, lad , but I suspect it's not English. So I wonder where you're coming from vocally with all this!

    I'm a native English speaker as with some others participating on this site. To my 'English' ears, there are INDEED some speakers of German that have a definite MASCULINE sound, but this is not univeral. Obviously, female and adolescent speakers of deutsch sound minimally if at all masculine to English ears, imo. If I can think of one aspect of German speech off the top of my head that sounds the most masculine of all (to English ears) it is the gutteral sound in typical German. Schwyzerduetsch (a form of hochdeutsch for those of you who don't know any better) is one form of deutsch that to my ears doesn't sound harsh/rough/masculine--It's to me more soft-sounding/melodic...very Svensk-like, very pleasurable to the ears (English ones, that is). I love to hear speech/audio along the lines of Schwyzerduetsch, Svensk, etc.--such are the vocals of down-home folks!, minimally 'harsh/rough/masculine,' & to the max. generally pleasant and warm--as my 'English' ears go, that is!

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    Quote Originally Posted by volksdeutsche
    I can also always tell when a Dutchman (sometimes Danes too) speak English. It sounds very choppy. Some Norwegians have almost RP English pronunciation. Swedes pronounce all the consonants, similar to Irishmen. The Irish accent of English from Dublin is rather clear.
    Actually, I've heard a good number of Dutchmen whose English sounds very, very natural. Fluency seems relatively easy for them to achieve. Phonological, syntactic, and lexical similarities between these two West Germanic languages make this possible. It's much easier for speakers of Frisian, really, but that's another matter.

    Swedes tend to give a sing-song quality to English due to L1 interference in the production of proper English intonation patterns and vowel sounds.

    Lastly, to say that the Irish pronounce all the consonants is absolutely not true. Imagine an Irishman saying the sentence just before this one. Since there's a great deal of reduction involved in Irish connected speech (as with any variety of English), the average Irishman would probably replace the alveolar stop in "not" with a glottal stop, before going on to produce the alveolar stop in "true." Additionally, many Irishmen would probably nearly delete the first nasal in "consonants," similar to the way a Frenchmen would delete the word-final nasal in "revolution." There are other phonological reduction patterns inherent in Irish English, but I hope you see my point without me having to do an entire phonological survey of Irish English.

    Anyway, trying to characterize a language in terms such as "masculinity" is fairly futile. Such things are entirely subjective.
    Last edited by Bogatyr; Sunday, November 16th, 2003 at 08:01 AM.

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    Post Re: German: The Most Masculine Language!

    I think it was Charles (Hausburg) the first of Spain, Emperor of Germany who said that German was good to talk to men, French to women and Spanish to God.

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    Post Re: German: The Most Masculine Language!

    This is an old thread, but I owe it to you all to point out that many of you confuse maleness with "masculinity" as defined by one particular standard.

    By the standard to which you refer, German is indeed "masculine" (i.e. gruff and "macho").

    I would rather hear a man (or a woman) speak Hungarian, Japanese, or French.

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    Post AW: German: The Most Masculine Language!

    Quote Originally Posted by Nordgau
    The most earthy and strong German dialect is without doubt Bairisch (Bavarian). By the way, every German will certify that the most unpleasant sounding German dialect is Sächsisch (Saxon) - except for the Saxons themselves. Only Kanakendeutsch, the "German" of Turkish youths who can't speak it properly and have their own slang expressions etc., is worse.

    For sure, Sächsisch ("Ei fa bipsch noch e mol!") is the worst German, maybe the worst dialect in general I've ever heard.

    Anyway: How "masculine" you sound, really depends on what German dialect you speak. Bavarian is for sure really strong, but also the clear German spoken in northern Germany (not "Plattdütsch", which sounds quite "smooth" and reminds me of a strange mixture of all Scandinavian languages and English) has a rather harsh sound.

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