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Thread: Did modern English come from the ancient Germanic dialect of Angli, Sachsen, Jute or Frisians?

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    Question Did modern English come from the ancient Germanic dialect of Angli, Sachsen, Jute or Frisians?

    Did modern English come from the ancient Germanic dialect of Angli,Sachsen,Jute or Frisians?Did Franks affect the ancient English language?By the way,did the word "angel" come from "Angli"?Thanks!

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    Konrad
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    AW: Modern English language

    England was invaded by anglon and saxon tribes. In this way it was especialy the languages of those tribes which resuklted in the old-english language.

    Later French got populary in the european nobility and this effected that the old english, what was until the 10 century verry close to old-german, was influenced by english, which leaded to the modern english.

    Possibly also the franks had a little influence on english, since flemisch have settled them also on the island. (I once hearde that Robert the Bruce would have been descendent of a flemish family and "the Bruce" would have come from "de Bruges" = of Brugge)

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    Re: AW: Modern English language

    (I once hearde that Robert the Bruce would have been descendent of a flemish family and "the Bruce" would have come from "de Bruges" = of Brugge)
    I think that comes from de "Bruis", a place in France.

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    Re: Modern English language

    Quote Originally Posted by kgnju
    Did modern English come from the ancient Germanic dialect of Angli,Sachsen,Jute or Frisians?
    Modern standard English is, if I am not mistaken, largely derived from the Saxon dialect, but with substantial post-OE influence from the dialect of the Angles.


    Did Franks affect the ancient English language?
    Not that I know of, though the Germanic language of the Franks and that of the Anglo-Saxons would have been the same language, just different dialects. And where the difference is not linguistic but dialectal, influence is much easier to have happen and much harder to detect.


    By the way,did the word "angel" come from "Angli"?Thanks!
    The word "angel" comes from the Greek word "aggelos" (the first g nasalizes in Greek), which means 'messenger', and is therefore not related to the Angles at all.

    However, you are in good company to draw a connection there. According to tradition, when Pope Gregory I (540–604 AD) first saw Angles, being struck by their fair and beautiful appearance, asked what kind of people they were. When he was told they were Angli, we replied, "Non Angli, sed angeli." (Not Angles, but Angels.) He then proceeded to order their Christianization.

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    Re: Modern English language

    Quote Originally Posted by Leofric
    Modern standard English is, if I am not mistaken, largely derived from the Saxon dialect, but with substantial post-OE influence from the dialect of the Angles.
    I could be wrong, but wouldn't the OE period [along with the ascendant Kingdom of Wessex] be largely irrelevant in a linguistic sense to the speech of modern England, on account of the post-Conquest English revival [thanks to Chaucer et al] having been a largely Midlands phenomenon, the literary dialect being a development of the London dialect [though situated in Middle Saxon territory, the city was in the later OE period more allied to Mercia linguistically] and the East Midland result of Mercian Old English + Danish + Norman French.
    However, you are in good company to draw a connection there. According to tradition, when Pope Gregory I (540–604 AD) first saw Angles, being struck by their fair and beautiful appearance, asked what kind of people they were. When he was told they were Angli, we replied, "Non Angli, sed angeli." (Not Angles, but Angels.) He then proceeded to order their Christianization.
    Gregorius also asked "And who is their King?"
    "AElle, your Holiness."
    "Then let the Alleluia be sounded there!"
    [Somethin on those lines, anyroad! ]

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    Re: Modern English language

    thank you all for replies!

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    Re: Modern English language

    Wait a minute!! What did Old English sound like? Does anyone have an audio clip? Also, I believe that the Danes and Norwegians had their part in making the modern English language, along with Norman French (of course)..

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    Re: Modern English language

    Quote Originally Posted by Svetovit
    Wait a minute!! What did Old English sound like? Does anyone have an audio clip? Also, I believe that the Danes and Norwegians had their part in making the modern English language, along with Norman French (of course)..
    Here's a poem. Click on the big letters and you'll hear it.
    http://www.kami.demon.co.uk/gesithas...s/brun_oe.html

    Recorded from the author in 960, I promise.

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    Re: Modern English language

    Quote Originally Posted by Oswiu
    I could be wrong, but wouldn't the OE period [along with the ascendant Kingdom of Wessex] be largely irrelevant in a linguistic sense to the speech of modern England, on account of the post-Conquest English revival [thanks to Chaucer et al] having been a largely Midlands phenomenon, the literary dialect being a development of the London dialect [though situated in Middle Saxon territory, the city was in the later OE period more allied to Mercia linguistically] and the East Midland result of Mercian Old English + Danish + Norman French.
    Yes, what I've read is that before the Norman Conquest, the Anglian dialect of Mercia had spread to London, and subsequently, English has been based on that.

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    Re: Modern English language

    Are there any texts of the Old English Kentish dialect, or perhaps the earlier Jutish dialect of the south of England, or Kent?
    Wielki i starożytny rodzaj, wy zgnietliście podstępnych wrogów. Z starożytną mistyczką może, złączoną byłam waszymi hałasami..

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