Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 20 of 20

Thread: Nietzsche, Schöpenhauer

  1. #11
    Senior Member Moody's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Last Online
    Tuesday, July 10th, 2012 @ 09:18 AM
    Status
    Available
    Ethnicity
    English
    Ancestry
    Albion
    Subrace
    Paleo-Atlantid
    Country
    United Kingdom United Kingdom
    State
    Essex Essex
    Location
    England
    Gender
    Family
    Single adult
    Occupation
    Investigator of Souls
    Politics
    Pan-Germanic Nationalist
    Religion
    Runosophy
    Posts
    1,904
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    9
    Thanked in
    9 Posts

    Post Schopenhauer

    Spengler makes the point, in his 'Decline of the West', that Schopenhauer's work was commensurate with the surge in Evolutionist thinking in the 19th century.

    Schopenhauer's terrifying 'Will to Life' grinds on with the weak going to the wall, while the strong and cunning have their moments of survival and procreation.

    Similar ideas are to be found in Herbert Spencer, Henri Bergson and G.B. Shaw. This can also be related to Nietzsche's Will to Power, of course, as well as to Hitler's Social Darwinist view of Racial Development.

    Another important influence of Schopenhauer is in the field of Psychology. It was after reading Schopenhauer that S.Freud crystalised his idea of the 'Unconscious', remembering that Schopenhauer's 'Will' is a blind, remorseless, and largely unknown Force.
    Schopenhauer also brought the sexual urge into the concept of Will; this drive to procreate surely links the Freudians to the Darwinians.
    Nationalist philosophers will probably feel more at home with Jung's psychology than with Freud's, and we can see therefore the roots of such concepts as the 'Collective Unconscious' and the 'Race Soul' in Schopenhauer.

    The great American mythographer J.Campbell was also influenced by Schopenhauer, and again, we can see how this all fits in with the above; the Will is that fundamental irrational force which we glimpse in art, dreams and mythology.

    Schopenhauer was also one of the first to 'popularise' [of course, he was never 'popular' as such] the Indian Vedanta scriptures in Europe.
    He held that these had the best moral system, and he poured scorn on the Jewish, Christian and Moslem religions.
    It is due to Schopenhauer and others, such as Max Mueller, that we are now aware of the rich vein of Aryan culture flowing back to the Rig Vedas.

    Schopenhauer was very Anti-Semitic [and aren't all great men?], and also 'racialist', by today's standards. It may be for this reason that I have yet to get hold of a complete collection of all Schopenhauer's essays.
    He worked on those essays his whole long life, after completing his main philosophical treatise at the age of 28-30!
    This was called 'the World as Will and Idea', and there is only one complete English translation of it in two volumes in print that I know of.
    Everyman have recently brought out a useful one-volume abridgement of it.
    Here he takes his main idea, as described in the title, in every direction, piling example upon example; - they don't make philosophers like that anymore!

    Interestingly, the important philsosopher Ludwig Wittgenstein claims that he read little philosophy in his formative years, other than Schopenhauer.
    This is significant, because it is said by some that Wittgenstein succeeded in over-coming Descartes' dilemma I referred to in the above post.
    Wittgenstein was, like Freud, a Jew.

    Schopenhauer was a great Anglo-phile and a thorough intellectual elitist.
    He bemoaned the fact that Latin was no longer the sole language of philosophy/science in Europe, seeing this lack as a terrible dumbing down - what would he think today!

    He was an irascible, lonely figure who none the less lived well on private means, going to the theatre, playing the flute and reading the London Times [in English] most days in an unchanging routine of bloodymindedness.

    Hitler carried Schopenhauer's works with him throughout WWI.

    Anyone know of a complete edition [in print] of Schopenhauer's Essays in English?
    Last edited by Moody; Wednesday, March 5th, 2003 at 08:35 PM.
    Why are there beings at all, & why not rather nothing?
    [Leibniz/Heidegger]

  2. #12
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Last Online
    Saturday, July 15th, 2006 @ 10:25 PM
    Location
    Ireland
    Gender
    Posts
    107
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    0
    Thanked in
    0 Posts

    Post Nietzsche's racial ideas - a socialist review

    World Socialist Web Site

    One hundred years since the death of Friedrich Nietzsche: a review of his ideas and influence—Part 2
    By Stefan Steinberg
    21 October 2000

    * * *

    Whom do I hate most among the rabble of today? The socialist rabble, the chandala apostles, who undermine the instinct, the pleasure, the worker's sense of satisfaction with his small existence—who make him envious, who teach him revenge. The source of wrong is never unequal rights but the claim of “equal” rights—Nietzsche's The Anti-Christ , 1888

    ... several of our friends and collaborators have at times the opportunity of observing that the Nietzschean error has helped young Frenchmen to cleanse themselves of the revolutionary error—Charles Maurras in L'Action francaise , 1909



    * * *


    Nietzsche and the political right

    Charles Maurras was the editor of the French ultra-right-wing newspaper L'Action francaise at the beginning of the twentieth century. Generally speaking his political movement had little time for Germans who, in line with the racist ideology of Action Francaise, were members of the inferior “Slavic” race and therefore “barbarians”. For Maurras and his followers, however, Nietzsche was a “great barbarian” whose work, despite its errors, was a useful antidote to the poison of “revolution” (socialism).

    During his lifetime Nietzsche's work was largely disregarded or discounted by the intellectual establishment in Germany. In Ecce Homo, Nietzsche (proudly) records that one of his published books had sold just a handful of copies in two years. After his death and in the first decades of the twentieth century, as political tensions grew in Germany and throughout Europe, the situation changed for Nietzsche. One writer comments that many German soldiers went off to fight in the First World War with a copy of the bible in one pocket and Nietzsche's Thus Spake Zarathustra in the other.

    Among Nietzsche's most devoted German adherents at this time were the publicist Oswald Spengler, author of a bitter tirade against socialism and liberal democracy The Decline of the West; the young writer Ernest Juenger, who admired Nietzsche's advocacy of the military spirit and the virtue of war; and, amongst the choir of admirers, an Austrian born would-be painter—the young Adolph Hitler. Nietzsche was also to play a powerful role in the development of one of Germany's most prominent philosophers in the first half of the twentieth century, Martin Heidegger.


    Nietzsche, anti-Semitism and Gobineau

    Many of the commentaries on the Nietzsche anniversary currently circulating in the German press make one and the same point (see for example Manfred Riedel in his essay on Nietzsche in a recent edition of the magazine Der Spiegel): it is ludicrous to suggest any connection between the work of Friedrich Nietzsche and extreme-right movements of the twentieth century, in particular National Socialism. Any link between Nietszche and fascism, such commentators argue, is entirely the product of the distortion of his work undertaken by his sister Elisabeth. It is worth looking more closely at this argument.

    First of all, it is correct that following his final mental breakdown and during the last decade of his life, his sister Elisabeth Förster Nietzsche took over prime responsibility for his care. With total control over her brother's literary estate she abused her position of trust to falsify and distort particular aspects of his work. In particular she prevented the publication of his last written text and biographical work Ecce Homo, which, with its pronounced tones of megalomania, pointed only too clearly to Nietzsche's impending mental collapse. By all accounts a thoroughly mean and possessive woman, Elisabeth Förster Nietzsche was also a virulent anti-Semite. She tampered with material and forged letters to transform her brother and depict him in the same light, i.e., as a rabid anti-Semite.

    There is a famous photo (on display in the current Weimar exhibition) which shows Elisabeth Förster Nietzsche greeting Adolph Hitler, whom she admired intensely, to the house in Weimar where Nietzsche died (1934). During his visit she presented Hitler with her brother's walking stick. Hitler had already visited the Weimar Nietzsche archive in 1932, and another well-known photo shows Hitler glaring fiercely at a bust of the man he regarded as his philosophical mentor.

    Nietzsche's own views on the issue of Judaism are complex and often contradictory. Nietzsche's break with Richard Wagner was at least partly based on the latter's persistent advocacy of extreme anti-Semitism; and in 1887 Nietzsche wrote a letter to his sister deploring her marriage to another vicious anti-Semite, Bernhard Förster. In one of his last brief missives to his friend Overbeck he even stated he wished to “shoot all anti-Semites”. On the other hand, throughout his works can be found derogatory references to Judaism—in particular to the role played by the Jews in the degeneration of the Christian religion.

    The difficulties of charting Nietzsche's position are expressed most clearly in his work Beyond Good and Evil (1886). In one passage Nietzsche initially argues that to be anti-Semitic is just as idiotic as to be anti-French, anti-Polish, etc. He then calls for a ban on further immigration of Jews to Germany, arguing that the country already has too many Jews. Nietzsche then goes on to describe the Jews as the strongest, toughest and purest of all races in Europe and ends by calling for the cross-breeding ( Zuchtung) of Europe's two purest races (the Jewish and the Germanic) in order to achieve a new powerful ruling caste for the Continent.

    The truth is, despite the occasional favourable references to the Jews in his work, what characterises Nietzsche's entire oeuvre are reactionary racist standpoints which were to take a particularly virulent form in Europe in the second half of the nineteenth century. Such nostrums found their supreme reactionary expression in the work of the French aristocrat, Count Arthur Gobineau (1816—82).

    One of the better contemporary discussions of the development of racist ideas in the nineteenth century is to be found in the book The Meaning of Race by Kenan Malik.[1] Malik makes an important point. He argues that the rapid and extreme departure from the progressive Enlightenment conception of race in the second half of the nineteenth century was not just a product of colonial expansion on the part of the great imperialist nations. It also was a reflection of growing social inequality and class antagonisms in the developed European nations themselves.

    Malik writes: “The sense of racial superiority that European elite classes felt over the non-European society cannot be understood outside of the sense of the inferiority imposed upon the masses at home.... Indeed I would go further still and argue that the discourse of race arose out of perceived differences within European society and only later was it systematically applied to differences of skin colour” (p. 82).

    This point is important with respect to Nietzsche because, as we have already dealt with in our first article, Nietzsche was always extremely sensitive to what he regarded as the dangers arising from the concessions made to broad layers of workers in a democratic form of society. It is therefore not surprising to learn that Nietzsche was extremely enthusiastic about Gobineau's ideas as he first read Essays on the Inequality of Races.

    Malik quotes from Gobineau's own Essays on the Inequality of Races (1853-55): “It has already been established that every social order is founded upon three original classes, each of which represents a racial variety: the nobility, a more or less accurate reflection of the conquering race; the bourgeoisie composed of mixed stock coming close to the chief race; and the common people who live in servitude or at least in a very depressed position. These last belong to a lower race which came about in the south through miscegenation with the Negroes and in the north with the Finns.”

    In fact, a form of biological racism is detectable in Nietzsche's work from the very beginning. We have already drawn attention to Nietzsche's treatment of the Greek philosopher Socrates in The Birth of Tragedy. In an additional essay “The Problem of Socrates”, Nietzsche addresses the issue of Socrates' alleged ugliness and poses the question of whether this characteristic was not the product of “racial cross-breeding”: “Was Socrates a Greek at all? Ugliness is often enough the expression of a development that has been crossed, thwarted by crossing.”

    The impact of Gobineau's ideas is almost certainly apparent in Nietzsche's On the Genealogy of Morals (1887) . Beginning with the claim that the genealogical method is the correct one, Nietzsche states: “In Latin malus ... could indicate the common man as the dark one, especially as the black-haired one, as the pre-Aryan dweller of the Italian soil which distinguished itself most clearly through his colour from blonds who became their masters, namely the Aryan conquering race.”

    In the manner of Gobineau, Nietzsche then goes on to incorporate the struggle against socialism and the commune (the most primitive form of society) into a crude racially-based depiction of historical development: “Who can say whether modern democracy, even more modern anarchism and especially that inclination for the “commune”, for the most primitive form of society, which is now shared by all the socialists of Europe, does not signify in the main a tremendous counterattack —and that the conqueror and master race, the Aryan, is not succumbing physiologically, too?”

    Nietzsche continues: “These carriers of the most humiliating and vengeance-seeking instincts, the descendants of all European and non-European slavery, especially of the pre-Aryan people—they represent mankind's regression!” And finally Nietzsche concludes with a hymn of praise to the “blond Germanic beast”: “At heart in these predominant races we cannot mistake the bird of prey, the blond beast who lusts after booty and victory.... The deep, icy mistrust the German brings forth when he comes to power, even today, is an echo of the indelible outrage with which Europe looked on the rage of the blond Germanic beast for hundreds of years.”

    Let us be absolutely clear about what Nietzsche is saying in these passages. According to his thesis socialists, democrats and the broad masses of society are the products of the most primitive form of pre-Aryan society. Their very existence threatens the purity of the Aryan master race, the blond beast. In Zarathustra, Nietzsche has already declared that the preservation of the over-man (Übermensch) is the highest good and justifies: “the greatest evil”.

    Apologists for Nietzsche seek to distance him from the policy and activities of the Nazis. But is Nietzsche's position here so remote from Adolph Hitler's entreaty, in an internal NSDAP memo of 1922, for the: “most uncompromising and brutal determination to destroy and liquidate Marxism”? Adolph Hitler was certainly no philosopher, just as Nietzsche was not merely a political ideologue. But who can reasonably doubt that the former had little difficulty in seamlessly incorporating the latter's thoroughly backward-looking programme of biological racism, hatred of socialism and the concept of social equality—together with his advocacy of militarism and war—into the eclectic baggage of ideas which constituted the programme of National Socialism?

    Notes:

    (1) Kenan Malik,The Meaning of Race, 1996, Macmillan Press
    He will be put to death, but three days later he will be raised to life. Luke 9:22

    hmmm...isn't Sunday two days after Friday?

  3. #13
    Senior Member Mac Seafraidh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Last Online
    Friday, April 20th, 2018 @ 08:21 PM
    Ethnicity
    Anglo-American
    Ancestry
    German, Irish, Italian, and either Flemish or Walloon
    Subrace
    Alpinid/Borreby
    Country
    Vinland Vinland
    State
    Delaware Delaware
    Location
    U$$Rael
    Gender
    Age
    37
    Family
    Single, looking
    Occupation
    Forum activist
    Politics
    Fascism and National Socialism
    Religion
    Atheism
    Posts
    1,634
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    1
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    3
    Thanked in
    3 Posts

    Post

    Nietzsche's life was pretty intresting he had a brother that died as an infant I believe. His father was a Lutheran minister. Later in his life his sister twisted a lot of his ideas and made them more national socialist angled as he was going insane, but anyway a very important and intelligent German(Prußland).

  4. #14
    Senior Member Moody's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Last Online
    Tuesday, July 10th, 2012 @ 09:18 AM
    Status
    Available
    Ethnicity
    English
    Ancestry
    Albion
    Subrace
    Paleo-Atlantid
    Country
    United Kingdom United Kingdom
    State
    Essex Essex
    Location
    England
    Gender
    Family
    Single adult
    Occupation
    Investigator of Souls
    Politics
    Pan-Germanic Nationalist
    Religion
    Runosophy
    Posts
    1,904
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    9
    Thanked in
    9 Posts

    Post Re: Nietzsche, Schöpenhauer

    Quote Originally Posted by MVSSOLINI
    Nietzsche's life was pretty intresting he had a brother that died as an infant I believe. His father was a Lutheran minister. Later in his life his sister twisted a lot of his ideas and made them more national socialist angled as he was going insane, but anyway a very important and intelligent German(Prußland).
    Could you give any examples where his sister "twisted a lot of Nietzsche's ideas", making them "more N-S angled", as I have yet to find evidence of this.
    Why are there beings at all, & why not rather nothing?
    [Leibniz/Heidegger]

  5. #15
    Senior Member Scoob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Last Online
    Friday, April 1st, 2005 @ 09:39 AM
    Subrace
    Europid
    Country
    European Union European Union
    Location
    Inside the Box
    Gender
    Politics
    Posthuman
    Posts
    836
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    6
    Thanked in
    6 Posts

    Post Re: Nietzsche's racial ideas - a socialist review

    Nietzsche thought too much of "Blond Beasts" who did whatever they wanted without any thought or consensus with other humans. Like overgrown two year old boys.

    He never understood the power of society or collectivism, probably because he was a self-made outcast. He never understood how compassion comes into play in the emotions. How compassion makes human form societies and transcend the self in that way.

    He had a strange idea of the Dionysian, probably because he was too much of a Northerner. For me the Dionysian is everything in Mediterranean cultures, the indulgence in the senses and enjoyment of life for its own sake, without a "reason" - which is so lacking in Northern nations. I think life in the North is too lacking in sensual beauty, and Northerners need more of a "reason" to exist - since daily enjoyment is rather alien to them. For them abandon has much more to do with violence than anything else - which is why Nietzsche skewed his understanding of Bacchus.

    Interestingly, some Nazi thinkers associated the Apollonian with the Aryan way, and the Dionysian with darker races such as the Near Eastern people.
    Last edited by Scoob; Tuesday, June 29th, 2004 at 06:25 PM.
    "Whatever is done from love always occurs beyond good and evil." - F. Nietzsche

  6. #16
    Senior Member Stríbog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Last Online
    Wednesday, January 12th, 2005 @ 11:45 PM
    Subrace
    Nordid-Baltid (Aistin)
    Country
    Vinland Vinland
    Location
    Where Rust Belt meets Farm Belt
    Gender
    Age
    35
    Occupation
    college student
    Politics
    Environmentalism and eugenics
    Religion
    occultism & Nature worship
    Posts
    2,163
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    4
    Thanked in
    4 Posts

    Post Re: Nietzsche, Schöpenhauer

    Quote Originally Posted by Moody Lawless
    Could you give any examples where his sister "twisted a lot of Nietzsche's ideas", making them "more N-S angled", as I have yet to find evidence of this.
    I don't know about making his ideas more NS, but Elizabeth compiled various scattered articles into Der Wille zur Macht, which was not something Nietzsche intended.

  7. #17
    Senior Member Moody's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Last Online
    Tuesday, July 10th, 2012 @ 09:18 AM
    Status
    Available
    Ethnicity
    English
    Ancestry
    Albion
    Subrace
    Paleo-Atlantid
    Country
    United Kingdom United Kingdom
    State
    Essex Essex
    Location
    England
    Gender
    Family
    Single adult
    Occupation
    Investigator of Souls
    Politics
    Pan-Germanic Nationalist
    Religion
    Runosophy
    Posts
    1,904
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    9
    Thanked in
    9 Posts

    Post Re: Nietzsche, Schöpenhauer

    Quote Originally Posted by Stríbog
    I don't know about making his ideas more NS, but Elizabeth compiled various scattered articles into Der Wille zur Macht, which was not something Nietzsche intended.
    The "scattered articles" were notes Nietzsche had been compiling for over five years towards a massive volume he intended to call 'The Will to Power.

    Due to his growing illness, he was not able to finish this book and set it aside, having to write shorter works [such as The Antichrist] before his final mental collapse at the age of 44.

    His sister, as the executor of all his work sought to put all of his writing out into the public domain ['complete works' etc.,].
    As Nietzsche had left detailed plans of the Will to Power, she was able [with the help of Peter Gast, Nietzsche's confidente/pupil, and one of the few who could read Nietzsche's bad hand-writing] to put the book out; she never pretended it was anything else.
    It was published in 1901 - some time before the formation of the N-S Party!

    There is no suggestion that she "twisted her brother's work towards N-S" here, so I wonder why people keep repeating this cliche without checking it out for themselves.

    As always - with the holocaust and anything else - I ask for evidence.

    Nietzsche's view of the Greeks turned around accepted 19th century ideas on the subject in a way that's hard to appreciate today.
    He admired the Greeks, Romans and the Italians of the Renaissance far more than he did any other culture.

    He longed for a synthesis of the Northern and Southern European cultures and so championed the muisc of Bizet over Wagner, for example.

    He called himself a 'Good European' ...

    His conception of the Dionysian included its subsuming of the Apollonian; this is the position of the Persian prophet Zarathustra in his work.

    He liked the Mediterranean so much that he went to live in Italy!
    Why are there beings at all, & why not rather nothing?
    [Leibniz/Heidegger]

  8. #18
    Senior Member Scoob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Last Online
    Friday, April 1st, 2005 @ 09:39 AM
    Subrace
    Europid
    Country
    European Union European Union
    Location
    Inside the Box
    Gender
    Politics
    Posthuman
    Posts
    836
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    6
    Thanked in
    6 Posts

    Post Re: Nietzsche, Schöpenhauer

    Some of my favorite things about Nietzsche's thought:

    1. He championed the Dionysian instead of just Apollonian reason - a critique that is neccessary in the face of scientific materialism IMO.
    2. His geneaology of morality and subsequent dissections were excellent. His insight that while values and even truth are partisan and arbitrary - that nevertheless to be human, to exist, is to posit values, was quite insightful.

    After I most recently read Nietzsche, I found myself taking views quite opposite his, which I nevertheless wouldn't have developed if it hadn't been with engaging his works.

    Some of his ideas I found kooky. I've never been able to assimilate his idea of Eternal Recurrence in any meaningful way.
    "Whatever is done from love always occurs beyond good and evil." - F. Nietzsche

  9. #19
    Senior Member Moody's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Last Online
    Tuesday, July 10th, 2012 @ 09:18 AM
    Status
    Available
    Ethnicity
    English
    Ancestry
    Albion
    Subrace
    Paleo-Atlantid
    Country
    United Kingdom United Kingdom
    State
    Essex Essex
    Location
    England
    Gender
    Family
    Single adult
    Occupation
    Investigator of Souls
    Politics
    Pan-Germanic Nationalist
    Religion
    Runosophy
    Posts
    1,904
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    9
    Thanked in
    9 Posts

    Post Re: Nietzsche, Schöpenhauer

    Quote Originally Posted by Scoob
    I've never been able to assimilate his idea of Eternal Recurrence in any meaningful way.
    You have to think 'pre-Christian' to get there.
    This is because the pre-Christian out-look of pagan Europe tended to think in terms of eternal recurrence on the cosmological level.
    Why are there beings at all, & why not rather nothing?
    [Leibniz/Heidegger]

  10. #20
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Last Online
    Wednesday, December 13th, 2006 @ 06:39 AM
    Gender
    Posts
    56
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    0
    Thanked in
    0 Posts

    Re: Nietzsche, Schöpenhauer

    Here is a guy who started a revolution in philosophy, believe it or not. He has influenced many of those men of the 20th century who we Nationalists admire, directly and indirectly. So you better learn what his ideas are about.

    Things that I like about Nietzsche:

    The Slave Morality - like noone else before him, he pinned down what was bad in Christianity and Marxism. He showed how the weak were seduced by telling them it is evil to strike back and good to turn the other cheek; he showed how the poor were seduced by telling them the first shall be the last, as if being wealthy is in itself evil; he showed how the drive to improve and grow stronger was discarded, in favor of a focus on telling the world how weak you are, and how bad you are for sometimes following the Will to Power. For analyzing the Slave Morality, we must be eternally grateful to Nietzsche. He showed us the enemy's philosophy, thereby making it possible for us to fight back.

    The Will to Power - Nietzsche clearly described that which is the basis for almost everything we do. Even when the little child builds a tower of building blocks he does so because of his Will to Power - and when he destroys it, it is that same Will to Power that makes him do so. The Will to Power is there in our contests and sports, it is there in the hunt, it is there in the satisfaction of having built a barn or painted a painting or solved a math problem. Even when you blast the enemy in a computer game. It is there, because life survives by extending its will over the world around it. That is why we have this strong urge, and we should not apologize for it as the slave moralist would have you do, but accept it and understand it.

    Nailing down the Jew - Nietzsche clearly understood that the slave morality was an anomaly among Whites (and among all other Gentiles as well), but not among Jews, who seem to have been comfortable with it for millennia and survive by using it - they seem to be happy only when they talk of how persecuted they are, and feel no shame for having been defeated in the stories of persecution they tell. And they spread this worship of weakness to others as well, making themselves, the most downtrodden (they claim), the world's saints. Truly, they are unique among the races of mankind. Nietzsche was not afraid to say so, and that is why Jews hate him.


    What I don't like about Nietzsche:

    No idealism - You have to understand, this half-Pole, half-German was always the outsider looking in. This clearly influenced him. He understands the Will to Power but doesn't want to use it for the good of the whole - he simply wants individuals to embrace it for their own enjoyment. This is a man without family and children to care for.

    Eternal recurrence - Well, you can't expect one man to get everything right. Here Nietzsche borders on the religious, in that he doesn't understand how the universe works. This is not philosophy. It can be discarded without hurting the rest of his work.

    Dionysus/Apollonian - An interesting thought, but it is erroneous to divide the world's urges into these two. Actually, having read some Nietzsche I don't believe he always did. How, for example, would you fit slave morality into this division? It can occur both in the Dionysian and the Apollonian. No, this part of his philosophy is not very important. And it ties back to what has already been said: his love for the Dionysian lifestyle comes from being the non-idealistic outsider looking in, with no concern for the whole.

    Too damn boring - I mean, his books are thick and tedious! Really, you can understand Nietzsche simply by reading a collection of quotes, and by having an IQ in the 90th+ percentile, and by having the courage to be Politically Incorrect. There's no need to read through his entire collection.


    In closing, I give him four swastikas out of five, because he formulated important concepts that noone else had formulated before.

    Actually, I think I'll make this a separate thread.
    Last edited by Ventrue; Saturday, December 10th, 2005 at 09:44 PM.

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Similar Threads

  1. Schopenhauer's thoughts on suicide
    By Frans_Jozef in forum Modern
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: Tuesday, December 14th, 2004, 12:00 AM
  2. Schopenhauer on Christianity
    By Gornahoor in forum Christianity
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: Friday, December 10th, 2004, 05:07 AM
  3. Replies: 13
    Last Post: Thursday, November 20th, 2003, 11:44 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •