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Thread: Japan: The multi-cultists are not amused

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    Senior Member Gladstone's Avatar
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    Thumbs Up Japan: The multi-cultists are not amused

    Here we have a technologically advanced state whose citizens for the most part do their own work. Immigration is strictly controlled. The Japanese know who they are as a people, like themselves, and intend to continue to do so as they preserve their unique identity. (More power to them I might add!)


    The multi-cultists are not amused.

    The New York Times Says Japan Needs Immigrants. The Japanese Politely Disagree


    By Jared Taylor, October 29, 2003


    Japan’s post World War II forty-year economic growth surge without immigration has always been an embarrassment to the immigration enthusiasts. In 1990, the then-Designated Enthusiast Economist Julian Simon was reduced to admitting: "How Japan gets along I don't know. But we may have to recognize that some countries are sui generis." More recently, Japan’s growth has slowed, although it still compares reasonably to Western Europe. But immigration enthusiasts are coming up with a new argument: with its falling birth rate and aging population, Japan will soon run out of workers.

    The United Nations, which is staffed largely with Third-Worlders, loves to publish reports about how the West is withering away and can save itself only with immigration from, of course, the Third-World. Japan is another rich country the UN wants to help repopulate. If current trends continue, it says, there will be only 90 million Japanese by 2050. The Japanese government says the correct figure is about 103 million, but no one doubts the long-term trend is down. There will be fewer Japanese and more old people.

    The New York Times recently carried a typically condescending article telling us that the questions is "whether this country remains an economic powerhouse or its population shrivels and the slow fade of the Japanese economy turns into a rout." Quoting a UN study, the Times claimed Japan needs 17 million new immigrants by 2050 in order to "restore demographic equilibrium." The Japanese, suggested the article, will have to get over their dislike of foreigners and become multicultural - just like America! ["Insular Japan Needs, but Resists, Immigration," By HOWARD W. FRENCH, July 24, 2003]

    Does Japan face a crisis? The current population is 126.6 million, the highest it has ever been, and is still slowly rising—about a tenth of a percent last year. In 2002 there were 1,152,000 births, so the Japanese are not exactly vanishing. Still, the average Japanese woman is now having only an estimated 1.3 children in her lifetime, so barring more births or immigration the population will eventually shrink.

    The average Japanese reaction: "So what?" Japan is about the size of California but with the equivalent of nearly half the population of the United States crammed into it. A drop from today's 127 million to 100 million or even 75 million would make for a more comfortable number.

    And even 75 million would be more than the current populations of Britain or France. The Swedes don't sit around feeling sorry for themselves because there are only nine million of them.

    The alleged problem is not simply in the numbers, but in the age distribution—the prospect of lots of old people having to depend on a small labor force for their pensions. But this is not so daunting for Japan as for some other countries. Japanese have the quaint idea that the primary social support organization is the family. Their retirement programs are not as generous as in Europe, and require a smaller work force. For decades, Japanese have had high savings rates for just this reason: they look to their own resources. Although we Americans fancy ourselves "rugged individualists," we are more dependent than Japanese on government handouts.

    Moreover, Japanese are healthier and live longer than we do, and more every year are working past retirement age. Japanese companies have begun to institutionalize a system of immediately rehiring their retired employees as contract workers at fewer hours and lower salaries. The company benefits from their experience and the employees stay active and in the workforce.

    And there are many other things Japanese can do if labor really gets tight. Even with falling birth rates, more Japanese women stay home with children than in the West, and some of them could work. The agriculture and retail distribution sectors are still notoriously overmanned and could be rationalized. As a long-term measure, the government could directly subsidize child-bearing as some European governments do. This has not been very effective in Europe, but Japanese are more group-oriented than Europeans, and might respond to a serious more-babies-for-the-fatherland campaign.

    But open the country to Turks and Bangladeshis? Never! Most Japanese are determined to find solutions that do not involve importing foreigners because they are deeply attached to their ancient, subtle culture. They believe that only native-born Japanese can understand or maintain it.

    This conviction goes back centuries. In 1635, the Shogunate passed laws forbidding overseas travel, and cut off virtually all contact with the outside world. Japan might have stayed locked up tight as an oyster if Commodore Matthew Perry had not forcibly opened it in 1853. The Japanese remain convinced they are a unique, homogenous people with an island-nation mentality, unfathomable to outsiders.

    Some years ago in Tokyo I recall leafing through a book whose title would be translated as "The Japanese Brain." It claimed the brains of Japanese process sounds and language differently from those of Europeans. I also recall a serious work on evolution called "From the Fossil Apes to the Japanese."

    This almost biological sense of uniqueness has many consequences. Before the Second World War, Japan ruled Korea and Taiwan, and brought over a number of colonial subjects to work in Japan. Today, the second- and third-generation descendents of these workers—who speak fluent Japanese and are physically indistinguishable from Japanese—are not Japanese citizens. They are snubbed socially and have a hard time getting jobs. (This population must be borne in mind when considering the official count of immigrants at one percent of the population: one third to a half of those are Asians who were born in Japan, and speak Japanese as their first language.)

    Japanese do not dislike foreigners—they sell cars and cameras to them very cheerfully—but they prefer familiar company. Apartment ads often say "no foreigners," and silence may settle on the neighborhood bar if outlanders walk in.

    Public bath houses on the northern island of Hokkaido were in the news last year because they wouldn't let in foreigners. There was a stink about discrimination, and pro forma pledges of reform. The fact is, when Japanese take their clothes off for a soak, they'd rather be among their own kind.

    So far as I know, it has never been reported in the press, but many of Japan's legal houses of prostitution are off-limits to non-Japanese, too. Maybe disappointed customers are too embarrassed to protest, but "soap lands," as they are called, have bouncers—often dressed in tuxedos—who make sure the girls do not have to grapple with uncouth foreigners.

    Japanese who visit the United States are appalled by what they find here: ethnic politics, bilingual education, ballot papers in Chinese, racial preferences, interpreters in hospitals and courtrooms, jail-house race riots, foreign criminal gangs, etc. They wonder if millions of aging American whites can really count on blacks and browns to pay for their retirement. They have seen diversity in action, and they want none of it.

    Of course, the profit motive ensures they are getting some of it. As in all rich countries, there are menial jobs natives “don't want.” Even with a limping economy, Japan is paradise compared to the rest of Asia. Millions would love to come, and just like Mexicans, they are willing to pay traffickers to get them into a country that works. Construction companies put illegal Africans and Middle-Easterners on the job at night and less obtrusive Asians during the day. The police are always breaking up sweatshops and fining employers.

    The mostly Chinese networks that sprang up to handle the human traffic have branched out. Japan, which for generations considered itself the safest place on earth, is in the middle of a crime wave. From 1998 to 2002, robbery was up 104 percent, car theft 75 percent, purse snatching 48 percent, and burglary 42 percent. A general index of six serious crimes was up 75 percent. Japanese now even have surveillance cameras and neighborhood crime watches.

    The politically incorrect Japanese are not shy about who's to blame. The media routinely run stories like "Number of Foreigners Arrested Jumps 13 Percent." In an interview earlier this year, Deputy Director of the National Police Agency Shinichiro Kuwahara said:

    "Chinese criminals are making a fool of the Japanese criminal-judicial system. Even if they get arrested, they only get suspended sentences for the first offense and get deported. Then they come back with a forged passport and commit the same crime. Even if they get convicted, they can endure one or two years in prison, and in the meantime the money is transferred and their relatives build gorgeous houses with it."[Crime Rattles Japanese Calm, Attracting Politicians' Notice, September 6, 2003, New York Times, By Norimitsu Onishi]

    Many American newspapers are notoriously too squeamish to describe crime suspects as black or Hispanic. But the Japanese media routinely report that the robber "looked Iranian or Iraqi" or "spoke broken Japanese with a Chinese accent."

    Japan is a tightly-run country that does not yet have a broad underworld of legal and semi-legal aliens into which foreigners can disappear. If the authorities wanted to, they could clean up the immigrant problem. But deporting illegal aliens is (as usual) a matter of balancing growing public anger with industry's demand for cheap labor.

    Nor is Japan entirely free of the let's-all-hold hands sentimentality of Western liberals. Lefty academics write earnest editorials about globalization, and the need for Japanese to open their hearts to foreigners. There are even a few fledgling advocacy groups for immigrants that try to make sure illegals get their wages before they are deported.

    But perhaps the recent episode to best capture the Japanese mood was Mitsuo Fukumura's brush earlier this year with globalization. Mr. Fukumura is the mayor of a city on the island of Kyushu, close to South Korea. He preaches closer ties with Korea, and wanted to capitalize on what he thought was the goodwill generated by the joint Japanese-Korean-sponsored Soccer World cup of 2002. He proposed that Korean tourists be allowed into Japan without visas if they come through Kyushu.

    The result was a huge anti-Korean, anti-foreigner backlash, with protestors swamping the local government. Not only do Mr. Fukumara's constituents not want more Koreans, many of them don't want any foreigners in Kyushu. Mr. Fukumura's "Gateway to Asia" plan sank without a bubble. Although such sentiments have been run out of respectable society in America, the Japanese actually like their country the way it is. They intend to keep Japan for the Japanese.


    About the Author: Jared Taylor is the editor of American Renaissance, was born in Japan and speaks fluent Japanese. He is the author of Shadows of the Rising Sun: A Critical View of the Japanese Miracle.

    American Renaissance is a monthly magazine that has been published since 1991. We consider it America’s premiere publication of racial-realist thought, and we invite all users of this page to subscribe. The paper version is delivered through the mail, and the PDF version — with identical contents — is delivered to e-mail addresses. American Renaissance is published 12 times a year. One-year PDF subscription to American Renaissance costs only $ 15.00 ! Subscribe now.

    Last edited by Gladstone; Thursday, October 30th, 2003 at 11:12 PM.
    Turman found a copy of The Graduate, and thought highly enough of the story that he made a movie he considered to be 90-percent faithful to the book.

    But Turman and director Mike Nichols made one key adaptation, changing the Braddocks from WASP-y blonde characters into a dark-haired, more ethnic-looking family.

    From NPR's Present at the Creation

    http://www.npr.org/programs/morning/features/patc/graduate/

    http://www.norcalmovies.com/TheGraduate/tg11.jpg

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    I don't think the Japanese masses are too different from us, as a large minority of Japanese racemix when they immigrate to white nations, and I know more than a few guys who went to Japan and married a Japanese girl, one was black. The parents said he had to pay them a few thousand to marry their daughter. How weird is that. But what is the big difference is the elite, the leaders, are very loyal and protect their population. In contrast, the majority of our leaders are individualists who sell out their people for a buck.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nordhammer
    I don't think the Japanese masses are too different from us, as a large minority of Japanese racemix when they immigrate to white nations, and I know more than a few guys who went to Japan and married a Japanese girl, one was black. The parents said he had to pay them a few thousand to marry their daughter. How weird is that. But what is the big difference is the elite, the leaders, are very loyal and protect their population. In contrast, the majority of our leaders are individualists who sell out their people for a buck.
    The German geo-political thinker Karl Haushofer in the 1930's and 40's noted the striking similarities between the Japanese and European cultures, especially in respects to the European code of chivalry to Japan's bushido. He also compared Japan's Samurai traditions to those of Germany's Teutonic Knights. Haushofer concluded that the Japanese were "the Aryans of the East".

    There's much to be respected in the Japanese. However, as I said on OD, Japanese pop culture is about as pathetic as its American counterpart. Pokemon and Hello Kitty are enough to prove this as true!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Pushkin
    There's much to be respected in the Japanese. However, as I said on OD, Japanese pop culture is about as pathetic as its American counterpart. Pokemon and Hello Kitty are enough to prove this as true!
    Pokemon, anime, and all the pathetic attempts at movies and music from the East are way, way worse. The worst American B movie is 10 times better than the best Asian movies. There are a few good Asian directors, but that's because they are educated and trained in America.

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    Pokemon does not represent 'anime' as Americans call it and 'Anime' by no means are all movies. Try comparing American cartoons to Japanese, its obviously a matter of opinion and taste but to myself it is clear Japanese animation in general is far more original in terms of drawing techinque and style as well as story line.
    What Independant Japanese films have you seen? Japanese directors getting educated and trained in America has nothing to do with creativity, besides Japan has a very high I.Q, enough to educate themselves dont you think?

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    Quote Originally Posted by morg
    Pokemon does not represent 'anime' as Americans call it and 'Anime' by no means are all movies. Try comparing American cartoons to Japanese, its obviously a matter of opinion and taste but to myself it is clear Japanese animation in general is far more original in terms of drawing techinque and style as well as story line.
    I still say Japanese pop culture is as terrible as its American counter-part!

    But then again, this might be because of my bias towards more traditional folk culture.

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    most western pop culture is terrible.

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    Post Re: Japan and the Multi-Cult

    Quote Originally Posted by Gladstone
    Japan’s post World War II forty-year economic growth surge without immigration has always been an embarrassment to the immigration enthusiasts. In 1990, the then-Designated Enthusiast Economist Julian Simon was reduced to admitting: "How Japan gets along I don't know. But we may have to recognize that some countries are sui generis." More recently, Japan’s growth has slowed, although it still compares reasonably to Western Europe.
    Japan had changed its economic policies to stabilize its achievements and to distribute the wealth to the people. Japanese economy and society differ fundamentally from Western systems.

    Relatively few Westerners speak or read Japanese. They are blinded by Western ideas that do not apply in Japan. Financial growth rates are unimportant in Japan, as our economy is based on the people and their products and not on "paper".

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    Senior Member Gladstone's Avatar
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    Post Re: Japan and the Multi-Cult

    Quote Originally Posted by Aiko
    Japan had changed its economic policies to stabilize its achievements and to distribute the wealth to the people. Japanese economy and society differ fundamentally from Western systems.

    Relatively few Westerners speak or read Japanese. They are blinded by Western ideas that do not apply in Japan. Financial growth rates are unimportant in Japan, as our economy is based on the people and their products and not on "paper".
    The economic growth for growth's sake is madness. A person too can grow indefinately by eating too much till they weigh a thousand pounds or more....but is it healthy or desireable? The Japanese to their credit are resisting the nonsense and realize that the health of their people and culture are more important than short term material gain.

    Needless to say those promoting economic growth at all cost and mass immigration are well aware of the destruction those things reek upon peoples and nations and indeed that is the idea. Distinct peoples and nations conflict with the idea of "one world" and hense must be attacked and gotten out of the way as has been happening with Europeon states and now Japan.

    So much for diversity.
    Turman found a copy of The Graduate, and thought highly enough of the story that he made a movie he considered to be 90-percent faithful to the book.

    But Turman and director Mike Nichols made one key adaptation, changing the Braddocks from WASP-y blonde characters into a dark-haired, more ethnic-looking family.

    From NPR's Present at the Creation

    http://www.npr.org/programs/morning/features/patc/graduate/

    http://www.norcalmovies.com/TheGraduate/tg11.jpg

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    Post Re: Japan and the Multi-Cult

    Quote Originally Posted by Gladstone
    The economic growth for growth's sake is madness. A person too can grow indefinately by eating too much till they weigh a thousand pounds or more....but is it healthy or desireable? The Japanese to their credit are resisting the nonsense and realize that the health of their people and culture are more important than short term material gain.

    Needless to say those promoting economic growth at all cost and mass immigration are well aware of the destruction those things reek upon peoples and nations and indeed that is the idea. Distinct peoples and nations conflict with the idea of "one world" and hense must be attacked and gotten out of the way as has been happening with Europeon states and now Japan.

    So much for diversity.
    I want to show you something.

    The Australian Financial Review, Friday 22 November 2002, in the Review section:

    {begin}
    For a decade now, the Western consensus has been that Japan is an economic basket case. But this is a dramatic misreading of a perennially secretive society. ...

    The truth is that dozens of facts contradict the gloomy consensus. Here are just a few:

    * Living standards increased markedly in Japan in the so-called "lost decade" of the 199Os, so much so that the Japanese people are now the world's richest consumers.

    * Japan's trade has continued to expand. Its current account surpluses totalled $US987 billion in the "disastrous" 1990s. This was nearly 2.4 times the total recorded in the 1980s when Japan was already seen as the "unstoppable juggernaut" of world trade.

    * Although you would expect the Japanese yen to have declined sharply against, for instance, the US dollar in recent years, the reverse is the case: the yen's dollar value has increased 17 per cent since the beginning of the Tokyo financial crash.
    {end}

    I wish to interrupt here. Westerners think that the stockmarkets in Japan are as important for the economy and finance as they are in America or Britain. When the Tokyo stockmarket crashed, this was seen as comparable to the Wall Street crash. In reality, the stockmarket is regarded by us as a dirty sideshow that can be neglected for years on end with impunity. It made hardly news here.

    {begin}
    * At last count, the all-important Japanese savings rate, which has been the main driver of the country's success, was 8.7 per cent of GDP. By comparison, the rate for the US was 5.7 per cent and for Britain only 4.5 percent. ...

    * Japan has continued to invest heavily in its industries and infrastructure. Investment per job in manufacturing, for instance, has consistently run at about twice the rate of the US over the past decade.

    * ... Japan's net foreign assets have continued to mushroom. As measured by the International Monetary Fund, they nearly quadrupled in the 11 years to 2000. ... As long as Japan runs the world's largest current account surpluses, it will remain the world's largest capital exporter. ...

    * Japan passed the US in the early 1990s to become the world's largest foreign aid donor and, as of 1999 ,was paying out 67 per cent more in aid than the US. The UN is only the most prominent of many international bodies that depend heavily on Japanese money. (Japan accounted for nearly 20 per cent of the UN's budget in 2001). Tokyo is reaping a rich reward in terms of rising influence in everything from the International Whaling Commission to FIFA.

    * Corporate Japan's worldwide spending on sponsorship - from motor racing to universities - has grown by leaps and bounds. In the latter half of the 1990s, its sponsorship budget in the US alone increased by about 80 per cent In Britain, an interesting instance of recent Japanese sponsorship is the Asahi Shimbun newspaper's donation for the British Museum's Great Court. It is hard to imagine, say, the Guardian, which is roughly the Asahi's British counterpart, doing anything similar in Tokyo. In fact, the Guardian can't afford a staff correspondent there.

    By contrast, thanks to big increases in advertising in the past decade, not only can Japanese newspapers like the Asahi afford large bureaeus in Britain but they can undertake extensive goodwill programs.

    ... First, consider the claim that Japan's manufacturing industries are being driven to the wall by China. The mistake analysts make here is to assume that the Japanese economy is still highly labour-intensive. But Japan is probably the world's most capital-intensive economy at present. Capital-intensive Japanese companies supply the sophisticated components, materials and machines without which labour-intensive Chinese factories would have no exports. Japanese exports these days are not television sets and pocket calculators but rather machine tools, electricity-generating plants, railway rolling stock, broadcasting equipment, telephone switching equipment and internet routers.

    Capital goods industries are invisible to the consumer and thus Japan's dominance in many of them is easy to overlook. But capital goods are the ultimate fount of the world's wealth and historically the nation that dominates their manufacture - Britain in the 19th century, America in the first 75 years of the 20th century - has been ipso facto the world's leading economy. ... in many of the capital goods industries in which they are strong, Japanese companies face no significant competition from anywhere, let alone from Third World nations like China.

    Second, what about the claim that the Japanese economy is in the grip of a deflationary spiral? Actually, what Japan has been experiencing is similar to the persistent deflation the US experienced in the late 19th century. This was when the US went from rural backwater to the world's most powerful economy. ...

    Third, it is claimed that Japan has been eclipsed in high technology by a resurgent US. ... All the evidence is that Japan has greatly lengthened its lead in the past decade. ... . At last count, the title of the world's fastest computer was held by a weather-forecasting computer made by Tokyo-based NEC. By contrast, the fastest American supercomputer, an IBM-built machine used for designing nuclear weapons, is little more than one third as fast. ...

    The world now depends on Japan for virtually all of the many highly purified materials needed to make computer chips. To make today's ultra-powerful chips, you need ultra-pure silicon, for instance. US companies led the industry into the 1980s but they have long since fallen by the wayside. ...

    Japan leads the world also in the production of countless high-tech components such as laser diodes (the enabling components in the CD family of digital devices) as well as in the optical fibre networks that have transformed the communications industry. Meanwhile, Japan dominates in the supply of all nine major enabling components in mobile phones. A Deutsche Bank Securities study found that 29 out of 36 suppliers of these components were Japanese.

    The story is similar in the advanced machinery used to make electronic components. Take so-called steppers - the minutely precise optical devices that print circuit lines on computer chips. Broadly speaking, a chip's power is a function of how much circuitry can be packed onto it. So the technological imperative is to develop ever more precise steppers that print ever finer lines. US companies once dominated the stepper industry but Japanese companies like Nikon and Canon have now taken their place. The only other significant producer is ASM, a Netherlands-based company which sources its optical technology from Zeiss of Germany.

    Japan's high-technology dominance has been sealed by several key high-technology acquisitions in the US in recent years ... Take Furukawa Electric's purchase last year of an advanced optical fibre business from financially distressed Lucent Technologies. At a stroke, this gave Japan clear control of a crucial industry formerly dominated by the US. ... Another example is Hitachi's announcement earlier this year that it was buying IBM's path-breaking disk drive business. ...

    Fourth, even the West's understanding of Japan's financial trauma has been wrong-headed. If the Western press is to be believed, bad loan problems have threatened an uncontrollable wave of banking collapses. ... the banks' problems peaked as far back as 1997 - reflecting the fact that virtually all the problems are ultimately traceable to Japanese real estate and shares, whose prices have fallen little from their mid-1990s lows. Since then, the banks have been progressively restoring their balance sheet strength thanks to the generous "spreads" between lending and deposit rates.

    Moreover, the financial malaise has not starved Japanese industry of investment capital. Far from it; faithful Japanese savers have continued to save, thereby producing the wherewithal for the financial system as a whole to maintain and indeed expand its financing of Japanese industry.

    One of the most remarkable aspects of the basket-case story is how it keeps mutating. ... The latest "disaster" is Japan's allegedly out-of-control government spending. But Japan's budget problems are grossly exaggerated.

    OECD figures show that in the first eight years of the 1990s, Japan ran large surpluses. Since then the government's position has deteriorated somewhat but is still no worse than many other nations.

    It is often pointed out that Japanese government debt supposedly represented 120 per cent of GNP in 2000. This does seem shockingly high - but, unbeknown to most Western observers, it is a gross figure that should properly be netted for the Japanese government's huge and continually increasing financial assets. These include not only the world's largest foreign exchange reserves, but extensive holdings of its own bonds. On a net basis, Japan's national debt represents just 51 per cent of annual GDP - higher than the US's 43 per cent but lower than that of most other developed countries. ...

    Press suggestions that Japanese public spending is inordinately wasteful are equally unfounded.

    Westerners assume that Japan, in common with nations like Britain and the US, is avidly competing in some sort of financial beauty contest for the favours of the world's investors. That this is nonsense should be apparent from the fact that for decades Tokyo fiercely resisted American requests for even a token opening of Japanese financial markets. In the end, whether foreign investors consider Japan an attractive place to invest is irrelevant because, in contrast with Britain and the US, Japan is a capital exporter, not a capital importer.
    {end}

    I hope this was of interest to you.

    "Japan has been accumulating assets abroard, while the United States has been amassing debts. ... President Reagan ... pursued the illusion of military superiority at the cost of rendering our leading position in the world economy illusory; while Japan wanted to keep growing in the shadow of the United States as long as possible. ... Japan has, in fact, emerged as the banker to the world"

    " ... the prospect of Japan's emerging as the dominant financial power in the world is very disturbing, not only from the point of view of the United States but also from that of the entire Western civilization"

    "The United States and Britain are members of the same culture. This is not true of Japan. ... The Japanese think in terms of subordination. Contrast this with the notion that all men are created equal ... Japan is a nation on the rise; we have become decadent"

    Do you know who said that?

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