by Michael J. Polignano


It used to be high praise to be described as an “all-American,” even more so if you were an all-American from “the heartland.”

But what does it mean to be “all-American” these days? This phrase once referred to something specific: a good-looking, athletic, successful, morally upright, predominantly Northern European White man, a man characterized by fair-mindedness, hard-work, patriotism, and traditional family values. And even if he wasn’t a particularly good Christian, he was certainly no Jew or Buddhist.

The concept of “the heartland” seems to refer to what is most essentially and least dispensably American. We can live without a finger or a leg, but not without a heart. Racially, the heartland consists predominantly of Northern Europeans, since non-Whites and non-Nordics tend to concentrate along the coasts. The heartland represents cultural conservatism, while the coasts contain the strongholds of liberalism and decadence.

The all-American is an unhyphenated, unqualified American. The all-American signified the kind of man who built this country, the kind of man who made this country work, the kind of man without whom this country cannot survive. The all-American stands in contrast to the hyphenated-American: certainly the Chinese-, Japanese-, African-, Mexican-, and Jewish-American, but also the Irish-, Italian-, German-, Polish-, Swedish-, and any other hyphenated European-American. The all-American is an unhyphenated, unqualified American.

In the past, the concept of the “all-American” represented more than just a national self-image. It represented a norm, an ideal to which young Americans aspired. One might argue that a single all-American identity never existed. Irish, German, Italian, and other European immigrants all retained aspects of the cultures of their respective native lands. Regional differences, most notably between the North and the South, have existed since the founding of the country. But out of these different European and regional roots, a common culture and identity have grown.

My father was an immigrant from Italy. He was born in Florence in 1933, spent his childhood under the Mussolini regime, and became attracted to the America he saw in Western movies, an America of self-reliance and limited government. He really was an Italian-American. My mother’s parents emigrated from Ireland. They really were Irish-Americans. I honor my ancestors, and I have visited both Ireland and Italy. But in the end, I am neither Italian-American nor Irish-American nor even “Italian-Irish-American.” I am just American. All-American.

American culture may be shallow and vulgar compared to European high cultures and even to European peasant cultures. Certainly American cultural chauvinism is preposterous, since our culture could use a lot of cleaning up. But in the end, we have nothing else.

Millions of all-Americans exist today, but the concept has lost its luster, and many no longer identify as such. Whiteness, we are told, is no longer normative. We are told that American institutions and culture will persevere regardless of the racial makeup of the country. As for the mounting evidence to the contrary—the ongoing radical transformation of America by non-Whites—well, that is “diversity,” our new “strength” that we are supposed to “celebrate.” And if we don’t want to celebrate it, we’d better at least get used to it, since by the middle of this century Whites will be a minority in this country. That is, unless we all-Americans do something about it.

Now that anyone of any race can aspire to be an American, many all-Americans have lost their racial identity, and “Americanness” has lost its racial specificity. Most members of the White majority apparently see nothing unique about themselves, certainly nothing worth celebrating. And even those possessing ethnic European or regional identities increasingly sacrifice them when they conflict with non-White cultures (for instance, the removal of Confederate flags and monuments across the South). Ironically, they do this in the name of multiculturalism, proving that multiculturalism really means one thing: the dispossession of Whites by non-Whites.

Lacking a cultural identity of their own, many young Whites try to adopt the identities of other groups, hence the vogue for all things Negroid, hence the vogue for primitive tattoos and piercings. Can lip plates, scarification, neck rings, and clitoridectomy be far behind?

Today, some pro-White advocates suggest that we all-Americans identify ourselves as “European-Americans.” Our ancestors certainly did come from Europe, and “European” is sufficiently generic to comprise the considerable mixing of European stocks in America. The phrase might also be rhetorically useful for advancing the interests of Whites in a multi-cultural context.

I am hesitant to concede that White identity is on par with every other identity in a multicultural America. Whites, after all, built this country. Non-Whites have made little if any significant contribution, especially if one takes into account the negative effects of their presence. So it makes sense for Whites to see themselves as unhyphenated, unqualified Americans.But I am still uncomfortable with calling myself a European-American.

First of all, I am hesitant to concede that White identity is on par with every other identity in a multicultural America. Whites, after all, built this country. Non-Whites have made little if any significant contribution, especially if one takes into account the negative effects of their presence. So it makes sense for Whites to see themselves as unhyphenated, unqualified Americans. Furthermore, I don’t want to live in a multicultural America. I want to live in a White America, an America where White institutions and culture are normative and any foreigners must either conform to them or get out.

Second, to call myself a European-American implies that I have a homeland other than the United States. But I do not. Europe contains many flags and many peoples, and I am a foreigner to them all. My father wanted me to have dual Italian-U.S. citizenship, and I could apply for dual citizenship in Ireland as well. I may do so in case America collapses. But having grown up and lived nearly all my life in the States, I would be a stranger in both lands.

Mexican-Americans have Mexico, Japanese-Americans have Japan, Chinese-Americans have China, Jewish-Americans have Israel, etc. But all-Americans, particularly those who have lost contact with their distant European relatives, have no homeland other than America. It is imperative that we stand and fight to preserve it.


Source: http://www.michaeljpolignano.com/