View Poll Results: Should the English language be made more Anglo-Saxon?

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Thread: Should The English Language Return To Its Anglo-Saxon Roots?

  1. #21
    New Member BritishKnight's Avatar
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    Thumbs Up AW: Returning English to its Anglo-Saxon Roots

    As I take it, revivin' the Anglo-Saxon spirit of the English speech would be well worth a try! Though, it would only be regarded as a side lingo of a relative small percentage of the populace, since most Britons of nowadays are probably just too lazy or disinterested to self-educate them on that matter! Perhaps it would have some effect like in Eire, where the goverment took up such a project, ie resurrectin' Gaelic speech long ago, which shaped up as a quite a failure afterwards as most Irish still speak English as mother tongue!
    IMO when the BNP seize power in Britain, they will have a go at that subject, ie furtherin' the ancestral languages and heritage of all indigenous tribes of Britannia! We will see....

  2. #22
    Member Theudanaz's Avatar
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    Re: Returning English to its Anglo-Saxon Roots

    hasthou a wordlist that thou followst or upthinkst the words as them needs? me likes the intowing of words like "yearnest" and "sunderly".

    btw in Clark-hall there are written at the end of each [entry] that seem to be fornowed hues of oldanglish words, as byspell "geseon" - y-see. it made me think how it might be gamesome not only to fill in the lacks of anglish in today's speech, but to fornow the whole tung as it were, an unfrenched latemiddleanglish though be it well onefolded in worddeal-inbowing (as byspell, not "do dest deth, don don don, but: do doest doeth, do, do do) and likewise there needs no inbowing for atwarpwords nor much for namewords

    aught man must not forget is that not only were words otherwise, but the togethersetting of words was otherwise also. Snell and sweet, men not only lacked things that they now have, but men forsooth *thought* otherwise and built their speech otherwise. They said maybe, "I went to the shop, and he and she". And to those betowers and acusters who say that good many words in today's english cannot be overset by only anglish means I thave with thee that we have load against this, and that there is ever a way and foroft a better than the ladinish way as for snellness or snotership or understoodness, or all three at ones, it needs only a man be yeap in the wordsmithingcraft. Yet bethink it eke, how most such words in truth betoken evil things and stuff men ought not inbuy or have or undertake or neet at all, but are mostly the foretows of burgwarelife and the ills that come with them, and are not the needful things which are from of old and which we have nome from our elders, that some call in ladinish "culture", so it were the better to throw them off and have done with them. But here the plight is that such whole offdoing would most likely a-fremth men who are not yet ready to aleave their new dear niteless things suchas gamenwains, circleweirds (reckoningboxes), farseeboxes, leamstream (spark-, lyget-), asf asf, without which however life might be better for all. the first step must though be forsooth the eftwinning of our tung.


    Quote Originally Posted by thiedischer
    I thave heartily with thee Theudanaz, They have forstelled a good many words for which there is already a well good English word. But I thought they had some lockend thoughts, sunderly the oversettings of the Ladinish craftly words on the "Anglish" webside. I sunderly oversett the craftly words on English yearnest. I find long English craftly words sheen. As byspell "Innergavelyieldsambit" for I.R.S.

    Agh for "re" I forbear "eft" "be" or "wither", and whileum "end".
    there is in the english wordbook "whilom", which is called a former or oldish word and means more "ago" though it comes down from that word that meant 'sometimes'.

    Forbear is in nowenglish neet something like "thole", but forebear (maybe with the foredeal spoken heaviest?) could mean [prefer], or maybe foredraw or foretow, or like more. [favor] is įr > oare or are /air/?. [favorable] = orful? [would be forwirred with some english ways of speaking (speechways?) with the word 'awful'.





    This is a good thought, a good beshead to make between two speechdeals.[/quote]

  3. #23
    Senior Member Thruthheim's Avatar
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    Re: AW: Returning English to its Anglo-Saxon Roots

    Quote Originally Posted by BritishKnight
    As I take it, revivin' the Anglo-Saxon spirit of the English speech would be well worth a try! Though, it would only be regarded as a side lingo of a relative small percentage of the populace, since most Britons of nowadays are probably just too lazy or disinterested to self-educate them on that matter! Perhaps it would have some effect like in Eire, where the goverment took up such a project, ie resurrectin' Gaelic speech long ago, which shaped up as a quite a failure afterwards as most Irish still speak English as mother tongue!
    IMO when the BNP seize power in Britain, they will have a go at that subject, ie furtherin' the ancestral languages and heritage of all indigenous tribes of Britannia! We will see....
    This is where i try and become an influential power within the BNP government and help push through such cultural revivals as this and also try to bring the Germanic world alot closer to eachother.

  4. #24
    Senior Member Theudiskaz's Avatar
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    Re: Returning English to its Anglo-Saxon Roots

    hasthou a wordlist that thou followst or upthinkst the words as them needs? me likes the intowing of words like "yearnest" and "sunderly".
    I benutt missenly orwells(?) for the words I think out. Old English wordbooks, the websides I have listed, and these eke
    http://home.comcast.net/~modean52/oeme_dictionaries.htm
    http://dontgohere.nu/oe/as-bt/

    it made me think how it might be gamesome not only to fill in the lacks of anglish in today's speech, but to fornow the whole tung as it were, an unfrenched latemiddleanglish though be it well onefolded in worddeal-inbowing (as byspell, not "do dest deth, don don don, but: do doest doeth, do, do do) and likewise there needs no inbowing for atwarpwords nor much for namewords.
    Maybe I have not forcouthed thee um mine "Niw Aljemien Inglish" Forewarp. He is besouvered English, bouten any Frensh or Ladinish, or Greekish inflood. I have not yet chosen how fel inbending he will have. Augh the spelling is forsheaden from this Normanish spelling we have now, and needtharfest, he is speechtokenly!


    Inbowing should be holden to a bewoldenhood (gewealden-had). I believe Netherlendish and Freesish would thain as good bisens.

    Forbear is in nowenglish neet something like "thole", but forebear (maybe with the foredeal spoken heaviest?) could mean [prefer], or maybe foredraw or foretow, or like more. [favor] is įr > oare or are /air/?. [favorable] = orful? [would be forwirred with some english ways of speaking (speechways?) with the word 'awful'.
    Yeah, I misspelled (or misbookstaved, if that likes thee) forebear. And yeah some folk would offsay(?) these two words forthem they speak both louds out, alike.
    Last edited by Theudiskaz; Saturday, April 22nd, 2006 at 05:05 AM.

  5. #25
    Member Theudanaz's Avatar
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    Re: Returning English to its Anglo-Saxon Roots

    Quote Originally Posted by thiedischer
    Maybe I have not forcouthed thee um mine "Niw Aljemien Inglish" Forewarp. He is besouvered English, bouten any Frensh or Ladinish, or Greekish inflood. I have not yet chosen how fel inbending he will have. Augh the spelling is forsheaden from this Normanish spelling we have now, and needtharfest, he is speechtokenly!
    No I think not that I nave seen this Inglish never thereof thou writst. hast written hin in lightstreamly kind out? and were that holden in a thread here on the Scathe mootstead? Ack maybe I have seen... Is the spelling thereof rather manyfold or doth he nute only the bookstaves y-mean to the writing of good nowtidely Anglish and bouten streaks or strokes over the bookstaves nor over many frempt bookstaves uncouth to our eyes? Me thinkth it needtharf eke that it be fewfold in the writing.

    Freesish and Netherlendish are good bisens indeed (thanks for bringing up that good word bisen)

  6. #26
    Senior Member Theudiskaz's Avatar
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    Re: Returning English to its Anglo-Saxon Roots

    Is the spelling thereof rather manyfold or doth he nute only the bookstaves y-mean to the writing of good nowtidely Anglish and bouten streaks or strokes over the bookstaves nor over many frempt bookstaves uncouth to our eyes? Me thinkth it needtharf eke that it be fewfold in the writing
    I fright me (theedishdom ) that he hath many more tokens than whereto we sind wont. It is sumes like Freesish Augh I would mathel thereover with Leofric and thee, and all the have lust thereum. (I'm being really experimental with these words, because I don't know exactly what the idioms were in Anglo-Saxon!). Bidde, show here on mine Forewarp.
    http://forums.skadi.net/showthread.php?t=52257 (

    *Afterwrit
    Yeah, I have forestelled him already on Skadi. Also, thou shalt onfind that the spelling is not fully "evenfollowsome" (consistent? that would be a neologism!)

  7. #27
    Senior Member Wayfarer's Avatar
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    Re: Returning English to its Anglo-Saxon Roots

    I would also like to see English become more anglicised if that makes sense .
    Just like i want Scots to speak better Scots rather than "bad" English.
    Introducing a whole new vocabulary is not going to work since it will sound alien to most folks. Instead i think the best approach is to gradually introduce alterative words of anglo-saxon origin that folks are familiar with and use them commonly so as it becomes normal. Thus starting a general trend towards using purer English.
    In Scotland there is a similar problem in that most folks only know a little Scots and even then they most likely consider it to be slang or bad English rather than a dialect.
    I try and introduce Scots words as often as i can in my everyday language when talking to friends or workmates.
    I find the best approach is to use words that everyone knows but never use or to use traditional Scots sayings or proverbs.
    For example i would use afore instead of before, ahint instead of behind, yon etc.
    "I telt him afore"
    "check ahint the couch"
    "see yon shops? Turn left once you pass..."
    Everybody will know what im saying and after a while ive noticed that some folks who would never talk like that are starting to use it. Maybe not all the time but it does slip out .
    Other words that are commonly known but not used are for example scunnert. Instead of saying how pissed off (or more precisely pist aff) am are i would say scunnert.
    "im scunnert wae this place"
    Also i would pronounce words in a Scottish way like stairtit for started, faither for father,telt for told etc. Basically words that most folk know and many use but would be considert slang or bad english. As general understanding of Scots improve, greater recognition from government and in the media, i think many will understand whats Scots and whats slang better.

    So if English is to become more Anglicised first you have to start with the basics, by reintroducing common words that have gone into disuse. Or just simply by using true English alternatives such as how much knowhow someone has on a subject instead of how expert he is.

    Maybe we should produce a list of english words of non-Germanic origin and true English alternative words to use?
    A! Fredome is a noble thing
    Fredome mays man to haiff liking.
    Fredome all solace to man giffis,
    He levys at es that frely levys.
    A noble hart may haiff nane es
    Na ellys nocht that may him ples
    Gyff fredome failyhe, for fre liking
    Is yharnyt our all other thing.
    Na he that ay has levyt fre
    May nocht knaw weill the propyrte
    The angyr na the wrechyt dome
    That is couplyt to foule thyrldome,
    Bot gyff he had assayit it.
    Than all perquer he suld it wyt,
    And suld think fredome mar to prys
    Than all the gold in warld that is.
    Thus contrar thingis evermar
    Discoveryngis off the tother ar,


    Scots is our mither tung; an gin we dinna hain it,
    thare naebody gaun tae hain it for us.


    Scots is our mother tongue; and if we do not preserve it,
    nobody will preserve it for us.

  8. #28
    Senior Member Moody's Avatar
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    Re: Returning English to its Anglo-Saxon Roots

    I agree in a general 'Englishing' of the English tongue, as long as it be in the service of a deepening of meaning.

    In other words, when English words are based on English roots and stems, using English pre-fixes and suffixes etc., then the meaning sings through the language.

    Whereas the Latinate and Greekish formulations in English are a veneer, and the foreign elements of such words are not always understood by the native speakers!

    Of course, it could then be argued that by learning the Greek and Latin roots of some English words, one broadens one's vocabulary. So we must be careful that we do not fall into the trap of an anti-intellectualism, which may actually harm language and literature.

    So I would not favour a complete Putsch of non-English elements [although I would certainly favour a ridding of all non-Aryan forms].

    Also, even Old English had non-English elements; a few from neighboring Celtic tongues, and even more from Latin due to the influence of the powerful Roman Empire.

    So I would rather see the development of a purer Aryan-English alongside Standard English.
    The former would be used by poets and nationalists who would know each other by such usage.

    However, for me, language is ultimately about communication; the main concern should be - 'am I saying this as clearly and as concisely as possible?

    Only when we have mastered this, can we think about a pure-Aryan-English vocabulary.

    Of course, the 'Anglo-Saxon' forms are usually the most direct and concise, so a purer Aryan-English must be seen to have the virtue of clarity in many cases.

    This 'more English' Aryan-English could have another name [Thiedischer has links to the form known as 'Anglish' on his first post, although this is a bit close to the canting term 'Old Anguish', used by naughty students of Old English!].

    As the aforementioned links tell, William Barnes was a pioneer in this study, as well as being a great dialect poet.

    http://www.thefab.net/topics/culture...iam_barnes.htm
    Why are there beings at all, & why not rather nothing?
    [Leibniz/Heidegger]

  9. #29
    Senior Member Theudiskaz's Avatar
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    Re: Returning English to its Anglo-Saxon Roots

    Maybe we should produce a list of english words of non-Germanic origin and true English alternative words to use?
    abandon-forlet
    ability-craft
    absent-offward
    absorb-bedrink
    abstain-forhave
    accident-belimp
    accompany-midsithe
    achieve, carry out-bego
    adult-fullwaxen(er)
    advice-read
    alphabet-staffrow
    ambiguous-twyfold
    arrogant-highmoody

    battle-camp
    behavior-bearing
    beautiful-fair, comely, sheen
    benefit-boot
    betray-beswike
    boundary-mark, march
    bottle-flash
    butcher-fleshmonger
    to trade-cheap

    cease-swither
    certain-yewiss
    change,exchange-wrixle
    commandment-bodeship
    common-mean
    condemn-fordeem
    consider-bethink
    continually-simble
    control-wald
    count-tell
    to cover-thetch, bethetch
    create-shape

    devotion-willsomeness
    difficult-hard, arvethly
    discretion-besheadwiseness
    displease-mislike
    distinction-beshead
    drake-ened

    endure-thole
    entice-forspan
    entrance-ingang, ingong
    envelope-umfang
    equinox- evennight, emnight
    especially-sunderly

    and so forth...
    Last edited by Theudiskaz; Saturday, April 29th, 2006 at 10:41 PM.

  10. #30
    Member Theudanaz's Avatar
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    Re: Returning English to its Anglo-Saxon Roots

    nice start of a list!

    Quote Originally Posted by thiedischer
    abandon-forlet
    ability-craft
    absent-offward
    absorb-bedrink
    abstain-forhave
    would this be synonymous with MnE "forgo"?
    accident-belimp
    accompany-midsithe
    achieve, carry out-bego
    adult-fullwaxen(er)
    advice-read
    alphabet-staffrow
    ambiguous-twyfold
    arrogant-highmoody

    battle-camp
    camp is from Latin I think. maybe "badow", "hild", "gunth", "wigh", also, MnE fight, war
    behavior-bearing
    beautiful-fair, comely, sheen
    benefit-boot
    betray-beswike
    boundary-mark, march
    bottle-flash
    butcher-fleshmonger
    to trade-cheap

    cease-swither
    certain-yewiss
    change,exchange-wrixle
    commandment-bodeship
    common-mean
    condemn-fordeem
    consider-bethink
    continually-simble
    control-wald
    count-tell
    to cover-thetch, bethetch
    create-shape

    devotion-willsomeness
    difficult-hard, arvethly
    discretion-besheadwiseness
    displease-mislike
    distinction-beshead
    drake-ened

    endure-thole
    entice-forspan
    entrance-ingang, ingong
    envelope-umfang
    equinox- evennight, emnight
    especially-sunderly

    and so forth...

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