View Poll Results: Should the English language be made more Anglo-Saxon?

Voters
205. You may not vote on this poll
  • Yes

    165 80.49%
  • No

    40 19.51%
Page 12 of 14 FirstFirst ... 27891011121314 LastLast
Results 111 to 120 of 133

Thread: Should The English Language Return To Its Anglo-Saxon Roots?

  1. #111
    Senior Member Theudiskaz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Last Online
    Sunday, April 1st, 2007 @ 01:18 AM
    Subrace
    Eriliskaz
    Location
    Wînalandom
    Gender
    Family
    Hermit
    Occupation
    Teutonologist
    Politics
    Pangermanicism
    Religion
    Ağelakhaiğús.
    Posts
    1,858
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    6
    Thanked in
    6 Posts

    Re: Returning English to its Anglo-Saxon Roots

    indeed seems to be from English in + deed
    Truly is English is it not? Or do you think it unenglish though its deals be English?
    Yes, but think ye on that I forseek not only to raise Old English words for which there is no other running English word, but eke Old English words as other kurs (or choosings, that is 'option'/alternative) for English words that yet live.

    Also, oath, warrant and troth are English (or theadish).
    Warely 'oath and 'troth', but I think I have listed them earlier. Though 'warrant' comes from ONF (and beginninly though from Frankish).

    here "sicker" still seems to come from Latin secur-, as does NHG sicher, Nor. sikker, asf.... any other thoughts?
    Right, but, for myself, the brouking of this word is little worry, as it came to our speech in such an early older. And yea it was there before the Normanish overwinning.
    -Hyge sceal ğe heardre, heorte ğe cénre, mód sceal ğe máre, şı úre mægen lytlaş. -The Battle of Maldon
    -I love the great despisers, because they are the great adorers, and arrows of longing for the other shore. -Thus Spake Zarathustra

  2. #112
    Member Theudanaz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Last Online
    Wednesday, February 10th, 2010 @ 11:22 PM
    Ethnicity
    Mixed Germanic
    Ancestry
    Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, English, Scottish
    Subrace
    Nordalpinoid
    Country
    United States United States
    Gender
    Age
    42
    Family
    Married, happily
    Occupation
    Engraving
    Religion
    Gnesio evangelical catholick
    Posts
    1,068
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    7
    Thanked in
    5 Posts

    Re: Returning English to its Anglo-Saxon Roots

    Thanks. That is good that ye do. Sicker, sickerly and sickerness have I found to be headings in the NED, after Clark Hall's word.

  3. #113
    Who?
    "Friend of Germanics"
    Skadi Funding Member


    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Last Online
    Sunday, April 1st, 2007 @ 03:43 AM
    Subrace
    Alpinised CM
    Country
    England England
    Location
    Devon
    Gender
    Family
    Single
    Posts
    161
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    0
    Thanked in
    0 Posts

    Re: Returning English to its Anglo-Saxon Roots

    Going off-topic here, but would the original form of Englishwoman have been Englisc-wifmann? And is there any evidence of its period usage or is Englishwoman a relatively modern compound?

    Cheers.

  4. #114
    Senior Member Theudiskaz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Last Online
    Sunday, April 1st, 2007 @ 01:18 AM
    Subrace
    Eriliskaz
    Location
    Wînalandom
    Gender
    Family
    Hermit
    Occupation
    Teutonologist
    Politics
    Pangermanicism
    Religion
    Ağelakhaiğús.
    Posts
    1,858
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    6
    Thanked in
    6 Posts

    Re: Returning English to its Anglo-Saxon Roots

    That is a good question. I do not know when the term is first attested. I haven't been able to find an etymology of the term yet. But I'll keep looking.
    -Hyge sceal ğe heardre, heorte ğe cénre, mód sceal ğe máre, şı úre mægen lytlaş. -The Battle of Maldon
    -I love the great despisers, because they are the great adorers, and arrows of longing for the other shore. -Thus Spake Zarathustra

  5. #115
    Member Theudanaz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Last Online
    Wednesday, February 10th, 2010 @ 11:22 PM
    Ethnicity
    Mixed Germanic
    Ancestry
    Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, English, Scottish
    Subrace
    Nordalpinoid
    Country
    United States United States
    Gender
    Age
    42
    Family
    Married, happily
    Occupation
    Engraving
    Religion
    Gnesio evangelical catholick
    Posts
    1,068
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    7
    Thanked in
    5 Posts

    Re: Returning English to its Anglo-Saxon Roots

    Dictionary.com sets Englishwoman to 1520-1530 AD

    http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/englishwoman

    Quote Originally Posted by Theudiskaz View Post
    That is a good question. I do not know when the term is first attested. I haven't been able to find an etymology of the term yet. But I'll keep looking.
    Anglo-Saxon O.E. Angli Saxones, from L. Anglo-Saxones, in which anglo- is an adverb, thus lit. "English Saxons," as opposed to those of the Continent (now called "Old Saxons"). Properly in ref. to the Saxons of ancient Wessex, Essex, Middlesex, and Sussex. After the Norman-Fr. invasion of 1066, the peoples of the island were distinguished as English and French, but after a few generations all were English, and L. scribes, who knew and cared little about Gmc. history, began to use Anglo-Saxones to refer to the pre-1066 inhabitants and their descendants. When interest in O.E. writing revived c.1586, the word was extended to the language we now call Old English. It has been used rhetorically for "English" in an ethnological sense from 1832, and revisioned as Angle + Saxon.
    This etymonline heading shows the nutting of "English" as a folkknowledgely word already in the early 19th hundredyear, which you may well have sickerly held to be true.

    also, there is:

    English (1) "people or speech of England," O.E. Englisc, from Engle (pl.) "the Angles," one of the Gmc. groups that overran the island 5c., supposedly so-called because Angul, the land they inhabited on the Jutland coast, was shaped like a fish hook (but how could they know this from the ground?). The term was used from earliest times without distinction for all the Gmc. invaders -- Angles, Saxon, Jutes (Bede's gens Anglorum) -- and applied to their group of related languages by Alfred the Great. In pronunciation, "En-" has become "In-," but the older spelling has remained. Meaning "English language or literature as a subject at school" is from 1889.
    Furthermore, Clark Hall has the heading Engliscman(n) "Englishman" (*Engliscwifmann is lacking), with witherbearing to the English Laws (LL), dictionary.com (random house) sets this to ere 950 LY. If used in the manifold or ymean onefold way, no wifely likeword would have well been needed. Engle could have had a withgathered meaning "men and women of England"

  6. #116
    Account Inactive
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Last Online
    Thursday, October 2nd, 2008 @ 06:46 AM
    Subrace
    Australasian
    Country
    Australia Australia
    State
    New South Wales New South Wales
    Location
    Armidale
    Gender
    Family
    Married, happily
    Occupation
    Maintenance
    Politics
    allergic
    Religion
    Subordinate
    Posts
    29
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    0
    Thanked in
    0 Posts

    English

    The term "Angle" for land of that shape is uncertain, as another poster noted above. A link with Sweden is possible:
    [Beowulf was of the Geats, generally considered to be the Götar from Götaland in southern Sweden, and the poem is largely to do with the relationships between the Geats, the Scylfings (Svear, Swedes or Ynglingas) to the north-east, and the Scyldings of Denmark. This, then, is the background to one of the most important sources of Anglo-Saxon culture we have. Add the archaeological evidence of links between Sweden and Britain from Uppland and Sutton Hoo, and the Swedish connection is reinforced. Yet historians appear to dismiss, or not wish to pursue, the Swedish connection."

    Mr Burns concludes his essay with an "Epilogue", remarking of Beowulf that "the language of the poem itself, even at the late stage of writing, contains words still more recognizable in modern Swedish, than in modern English".]
    "Yngling" may be the origin of " English" , returning to the root "Yng" vs. "Ang" from "Ingo" son of Odin.

  7. #117
    Funding Member
    "Friend of Germanics"
    Skadi Funding Member

    Melisande's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Last Online
    Monday, July 25th, 2011 @ 05:36 AM
    Ethnicity
    Anglo-Franco-American
    Ancestry
    Frankish, Langobard, Scots, Norman, Goth, Bretagne, Bavarian, English.
    Subrace
    Atlantid
    Country
    United States United States
    State
    California California
    Location
    Malibu
    Gender
    Family
    Happily married
    Politics
    Meritocracy
    Religion
    Unusual
    Posts
    291
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    1
    Thanked in
    1 Post
    After reading most of this thread (and some other things), I'm left wondering if there is any evidence at all of a language spoken in what is now England before the Anglo-Saxon "invasion"?

  8. #118
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Last Online
    Monday, February 20th, 2017 @ 11:02 AM
    Ethnicity
    Dutch
    Gender
    Posts
    526
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    0
    Thanked in
    0 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Melisande View Post
    After reading most of this thread (and some other things), I'm left wondering if there is any evidence at all of a language spoken in what is now England before the Anglo-Saxon "invasion"?
    Yes, based on the names of places then (and now) and of persons and tribes, we know that British/Brythonic was spoken, a form of Insular Celtic. Yet Latin was also spoken of course, by the Romanised Britons. And perhaps, although there is hardly any evidence for this, a dialect of Proto-Germanic was spoken in what is now Kent.

    However, what kind of language was spoken before the Celts came there, no-one knows. Perhaps the Picts, who lived in what is now eastern and northern Scotland, spoke a non-Celtic language that was previously spoken all over Albion. But there is not enough evidence to determine this.

  9. #119
    Account Inactive
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Last Online
    Monday, April 11th, 2011 @ 09:18 PM
    Ethnicity
    Swedish
    Ancestry
    sweden hungary
    Country
    Sweden Sweden
    State
    Sodermanland Sodermanland
    Gender
    Family
    Single adult
    Posts
    10
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    0
    Thanked in
    0 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Anlef View Post
    Yes, based on the names of places then (and now) and of persons and tribes, we know that British/Brythonic was spoken, a form of Insular Celtic. Yet Latin was also spoken of course, by the Romanised Britons. And perhaps, although there is hardly any evidence for this, a dialect of Proto-Germanic was spoken in what is now Kent.

    However, what kind of language was spoken before the Celts came there, no-one knows. Perhaps the Picts, who lived in what is now eastern and northern Scotland, spoke a non-Celtic language that was previously spoken all over Albion. But there is not enough evidence to determine this.
    in fact words like angle to describe lands are common all over the world

  10. #120
    Account Inactive
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Last Online
    Wednesday, July 11th, 2018 @ 05:09 AM
    Ethnicity
    Ethnicity
    Ancestry
    Ancestry
    Gender
    Age
    37
    Posts
    2,129
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    1,488
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    128
    Thanked in
    106 Posts
    My problem with questions like this thread, relate to what stage of development in Old English and which kingdom's variant? The two major types of English by the time of the printing press, were Mercian and Northumbrian. Personally, I am all for every form of English before Modern, which seems to have been most affected by Norman French, whereas Middle English was merely touched by Danish. At least, that's the breakdown I've read recently. Essentially, I would like to see a sort of pidgin between all different Germanic tongues, both West and North. This means, I prefer to see English be a conglomerate of Germanic expressions, as opposed to any non-Germanic influences.

Similar Threads

  1. Revival of Anglo-Saxon Language
    By Richard in forum Linguistics
    Replies: 24
    Last Post: Monday, April 23rd, 2018, 04:32 AM
  2. Replies: 1
    Last Post: Sunday, April 22nd, 2018, 06:41 AM
  3. Old English Language (Anglo-Saxon)
    By Johannes de León in forum Linguistics
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: Sunday, April 22nd, 2018, 06:27 AM
  4. Is the English Language Not Anglo-Saxon?
    By weland in forum Linguistics
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: Sunday, April 22nd, 2018, 05:33 AM
  5. The English/Anglo-Saxon Fellowship
    By Siegfried in forum The Hearth
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: Sunday, April 22nd, 2018, 05:17 AM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •