View Poll Results: Should the English language be made more Anglo-Saxon?

Voters
205. You may not vote on this poll
  • Yes

    165 80.49%
  • No

    40 19.51%
Page 11 of 14 FirstFirst ... 67891011121314 LastLast
Results 101 to 110 of 133

Thread: Should The English Language Return To Its Anglo-Saxon Roots?

  1. #101
    Senior Member Theudiskaz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Last Online
    Sunday, April 1st, 2007 @ 01:18 AM
    Subrace
    Eriliskaz
    Location
    Wīnalandom
    Gender
    Family
    Hermit
    Occupation
    Teutonologist
    Politics
    Pangermanicism
    Religion
    Ašelakhaišśs.
    Posts
    1,858
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    6
    Thanked in
    6 Posts

    Re: Returning English to its Anglo-Saxon Roots

    furthered from the Churchly Yorelore:

    And forthem the northern deal of this island lies at the top of middle-earth, it has light in the summer at night, so that oft at midnight the beholder finds it hard to reckon whether it is evening’s dusk or morning’s dawn. Thus this island has many longer days in the Summer, eke longer nights in the Winter than the southern deal of middle-earth.

    First this island was found by the British folk, whence it nims its name. It is said that they came from Armoricaland, and settled and beowned the southern deals of the island.

    Then it happended that the Pictish folk came by ship from Scythialand, and went up to Scotland (and earned mearth throughout Britain) and there met the Scottish folk and bade them that they might settle and wone among them. Answered the Scotts that their land was not mickle enough to hold two folks, but quoth: “We can beright you what ye might do instead. We know an island not far eastward from here that we can see on clear days. If ye will seek it, then ye can make dwellings there. Or if ye meet any gainstand, we will help you.” Then the Picts went into Britain, and began the settling of the the northdeal of this island, and Brits, as we earlier said, the the southern deals. Forthem the Picts had no wives, they bade them from the Scotts. They thaved to their bidding and gave them wives by the twain, so that there were more women than men, as it is yet to this day among the Picts.
    Last edited by Theudiskaz; Friday, September 8th, 2006 at 03:02 PM.
    -Hyge sceal še heardre, heorte še cénre, mód sceal še mįre, žż śre męgen lytlaž. -The Battle of Maldon
    -I love the great despisers, because they are the great adorers, and arrows of longing for the other shore. -Thus Spake Zarathustra

  2. #102
    Keeps your Whites Whiter.
    "Friend of Germanics"
    Skadi Funding Member

    SuuT's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Last Online
    @
    Ethnicity
    Germanic
    Subrace
    SkandoNordid/Nordicised Faelid
    Gender
    Politics
    Pan-Germanic MeritAristocracy
    Religion
    Heišinn
    Posts
    1,467
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    1
    Thanked in
    1 Post

    Re: Returning English to its Anglo-Saxon Roots

    To Moderator Leofric:

    You have wandered into a specific etiological camp and called it home. That it is not my home cannot change. I could debate your salient points, as there is a contra to be made to each one; including what Linguists do and do not agree upon. Different schools depending upon staff makeup and general ideological ilk tend to have a stick-to-it-iveness of the general intellectual timbre of 'mind' of the campus (I'm sure you know this ).

    Questions that are begged, and then given answers that themselves beg not only the original question, but the answer, are not attepts to derail one's enjoyable work. I noticed this slide from a dialectical process occur with Moderator Lawless and yourself, and wondered if I shouldn't just leave well enough alone: Its hard to not feel...attacked when one's premesis are unpacked--especially when there is an emotional horse in the race. It can also be hard to understand the English 'reserve' and 'dryness' of approach: for Americans it is pompous. But one mans bloister is another mans objective observation.

    The missed points were based upon your consistent exampling of PIE as contradistinctions to my inquiries. In essence, you were engaging my (somewhat) hyperbolic approach, rather than the saliency that resulted from the approach. Unbeknownst to you this caused an (I am now convinced) unintended red-herring, and missing of the point to repeat itself.

    Incidentally, I make a distinction between 'authentic' and 'pure' that I do not think Moderator Lawless makes (were we ever to hash this out, it would likely be a very plodding and boring semantic squabble). With that said, I do not think for a moment that any of the dedicated participants of this project will have any more difficulty with an authentic restoration of the OE tounge than did the skilled restorers of the statue of "David."

    However, its Purity would still be at question.

    But that is another thread.

    Best wishes.
    "...The moral man is a lower species than the immoral, a weaker species; indeed - he is a type in regard to morality, but not a type in himself; a copy...the measure of his value lies outside him. ... I assess the power of a will by how much resistance, pain, torture it endures and knows how to turn to its advantage; I do not account the evil and painful character of existence a reproach to it, but hope rather that it will one day be more evil and painful than hitherto..." (Nietzsche)

  3. #103
    Senior Member ęželing's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Last Online
    Wednesday, March 19th, 2008 @ 08:46 PM
    Age
    38
    Posts
    330
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    1
    Thanked in
    1 Post

    Re: Returning English to its Anglo-Saxon Roots

    I would recommend reading The Rebirth of England and the English: The Vision of William Barnes, by Father Andrew Phillips.

    William Barnes, a Devonshire poet, was a forerunner of the Anglish movement.

    http://www.geocities.com/bajparry/Anglish.html
    http://anglish.wikia.com/wiki/Main_Page

    Personally I see any attempts to revive Old English as romantic nonsense, but I think there is merit in Anglish i.e. substituting foreign derived words for words more English.
    Wita sceal gežyldig, ne sceal no to hatheort ne to hrędwyrde, ne to wac wiga ne to wanhydig, ne to forht ne to fęgen, ne to feohgifre ne nęfre gielpes to georn, ęr he geare cunne. Beorn sceal gebidan, žonne he beot spriceš, ožžęt collenferš cunne gearwe hwider hrežra gehygd hweorfan wille.

    http://www.odinic-rite.org/index2.html
    http://www.steadfasttrust.org.uk/

  4. #104
    Senior Member Theudiskaz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Last Online
    Sunday, April 1st, 2007 @ 01:18 AM
    Subrace
    Eriliskaz
    Location
    Wīnalandom
    Gender
    Family
    Hermit
    Occupation
    Teutonologist
    Politics
    Pangermanicism
    Religion
    Ašelakhaišśs.
    Posts
    1,858
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    6
    Thanked in
    6 Posts

    Re: Returning English to its Anglo-Saxon Roots

    I would recommend reading The Rebirth of England and the English: The Vision of William Barnes, by Father Andrew Phillips.
    Thank you.


    These two links are on the initial post of this thread.

    Personally I see any attempts to revive Old English as romantic nonsense,
    I wholeheartedly agree. I myself have never suggested that this was even desirable.

    but I think there is merit in Anglish i.e. substituting foreign derived words for words more English.
    Yes, absolutely.
    -Hyge sceal še heardre, heorte še cénre, mód sceal še mįre, žż śre męgen lytlaž. -The Battle of Maldon
    -I love the great despisers, because they are the great adorers, and arrows of longing for the other shore. -Thus Spake Zarathustra

  5. #105
    Funding Member
    "Friend of Germanics"
    Skadi Funding Member

    Leofric's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Last Online
    Monday, June 25th, 2018 @ 02:15 PM
    Ethnicity
    English
    Subrace
    Nordid
    Country
    United States United States
    State
    California California
    Location
    Pacific Northwest
    Gender
    Age
    40
    Zodiac Sign
    Aquarius
    Family
    Married
    Occupation
    Telecommunications
    Politics
    Libertarian/Neo-Imperialist
    Religion
    Heathen
    Posts
    1,200
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    10
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    6
    Thanked in
    6 Posts

    Re: Returning English to its Anglo-Saxon Roots

    Quote Originally Posted by Suut
    The missed points were based upon your consistent exampling of PIE as contradistinctions to my inquiries. In essence, you were engaging my (somewhat) hyperbolic approach, rather than the saliency that resulted from the approach. Unbeknownst to you this caused an (I am now convinced) unintended red-herring, and missing of the point to repeat itself.
    Hmm.

    Apparently the saliency you mention wasn't quite as salient as was planned.

    I thought you had meant to suggest that an attempt to go back to an earlier model was doomed to be undermined by subsequent attempts to go back to still earlier models.

    My contention was that there is no real-world model for a language ancestral to ours that's earlier than Old English, so any future attempts to go back to still earlier models are likely impossible. My thought with this was that there would then be no need to worry about always going back further, since Old English is the ultimate stopping point.

    To me, that seems like an on-topic response to my interpretation of your statement. Whether it is a good response is another matter (of course, I think it's good, or I wouldn't have offered it — but I understand that others could disagree with me on that). But I do think it's at least on-topic as regards my interpretation of your statement.

    Do you think it's not on-topic with my interpretation of your statement? If it's off-topic (and if I interpreted your statement correctly), then how is it so, in your opinion?

    Or rather, have I misinterpreted your statement? If I have, then what exactly were you driving at?

  6. #106
    Account Inactive
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Last Online
    Friday, January 26th, 2007 @ 05:00 PM
    Subrace
    Cro-Magnid
    Country
    Croatia Croatia
    Location
    Otok brač
    Gender
    Family
    Single, looking
    Politics
    National-sozialistische diktatur
    Religion
    Roman-catholic
    Posts
    57
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    0
    Thanked in
    0 Posts

    AW: Returning English to its Anglo-Saxon Roots

    i voted "yes", because every language deserves to be it's own, pure language.

    Our neighbours, the Bosnians, also have some problems with borrowed word from other languages like turkish and Serbian, and they also have a project aganist this stuff, and it seems to work.

  7. #107
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Last Online
    Sunday, February 25th, 2007 @ 10:29 AM
    Subrace
    nordiſch-weſtiſch
    Location
    Deutſchland
    Gender
    Family
    Single
    Politics
    Volk und Raſſe
    Posts
    1,628
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    5
    Thanked in
    5 Posts

    AW: Re: Returning English to its Anglo-Saxon Roots

    Quote Originally Posted by Moody Lawless View Post
    The word is from Greek, of course, because it describes a methodology first undertaken by the Greeks [and then developed by the Romans]. This is why all our grammatical terms derive from Latin.
    Morphology
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Morphology_(linguistics)
    I was only referring to the question that raised somewhere in this thread who first used or coined the actual word morphology. It is of course compounded of Greek elements, that's not the question, but I doubt that the word is documented already with the ancient Greeks, since that article to which you give a link claims itself that it was a modern neologism:

    The term morphology was coined by August Schleicher in 1859: Für die Lehre von der Wortform wähle ich das Wort "Morphologie" ("for the science of word formation, I choose the term 'morphology'", Mémoires Acad. Impériale 7/1/7, 35).
    That, however, can only refer to its use in linguistics. Regarding biology, it was at the least Goethe who used it earlier than Schleicher.

  8. #108
    Senior Member Theudiskaz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Last Online
    Sunday, April 1st, 2007 @ 01:18 AM
    Subrace
    Eriliskaz
    Location
    Wīnalandom
    Gender
    Family
    Hermit
    Occupation
    Teutonologist
    Politics
    Pangermanicism
    Religion
    Ašelakhaišśs.
    Posts
    1,858
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    6
    Thanked in
    6 Posts

    Re: Returning English to its Anglo-Saxon Roots

    There might be some repeats here:

    approach-near

    carnal, corporeal-fleshly
    cautious, careful-wary
    circumspect-wary
    command v.and n.-hest
    correct v. and adj.-rightwise (in addition to 'right')
    correction- rightwising

    disgrace, ignominy, ruination-shendship (Wycliff)

    enliven-stir, (sometimes 'quicken'), awaken, inliven

    future adj.-to-coming/tocoming
    future n.- tocomeness, tocoming

    give life to-quicken, inliven

    hurt-smart, werk/werch

    inane, unintelligent, ignorant-unwitty
    indeed-yea
    insane, mad, frenzied-wood
    insanity, madness-woodness

    judgement-doom, ordeal (in some contexts, esp as in a gerundive sense, i.e the process of judging, trying)

    know (that)-wit; I woat, thou woa(t)st/you wit, he woat, we wit, ye/you wit, they wit

    lodge, accomodate, shelter-harbor

    mental-mindish, mind-, soulish, soul-
    mole-moldwarp/worp

    pain-smart, werk/werch
    patently-openly
    pledge, promise v.-behet
    pledge, promise n.-behest,
    provoke, agitate, disturb-stir
    psyche-soul
    psychological-soulish, soul-, mindish, mind-
    psychology-soullore/soul-lore
    pure-clean

    security, safety-sickerness, sickerhood
    silence-stillness
    silent-still
    skill-craft
    spirit-ghost
    spiritual-ghostly, soulish

    truly-yea, warely

    verily-warely
    -Hyge sceal še heardre, heorte še cénre, mód sceal še mįre, žż śre męgen lytlaž. -The Battle of Maldon
    -I love the great despisers, because they are the great adorers, and arrows of longing for the other shore. -Thus Spake Zarathustra

  9. #109
    BrunnBeast
    Guest

    Re: Returning English to its Anglo-Saxon Roots

    I don't think it will work considering that modern English is used all over the world and is the most important language in the business world (until Mandarin surpasses it), but if you can pull it off you've got my support and I'll do my part to learn.
    Last edited by Siegfried; Saturday, January 20th, 2007 at 03:28 PM.

  10. #110
    Member Theudanaz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Last Online
    Wednesday, February 10th, 2010 @ 11:22 PM
    Ethnicity
    Mixed Germanic
    Ancestry
    Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, English, Scottish
    Subrace
    Nordalpinoid
    Country
    United States United States
    Gender
    Age
    42
    Family
    Married, happily
    Occupation
    Engraving
    Religion
    Gnesio evangelical catholick
    Posts
    1,068
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    7
    Thanked in
    5 Posts

    Re: Returning English to its Anglo-Saxon Roots

    Quote Originally Posted by Theudiskaz View Post
    There might be some repeats here:

    approach-near

    carnal, corporeal-fleshly
    cautious, careful-wary
    circumspect-wary
    command v.and n.-hest
    correct v. and adj.-rightwise (in addition to 'right')
    correction- rightwising
    One is like wonder on how righteous is thought to have come from rihtwis albeit with twisting of staves. good to bring it back.
    disgrace, ignominy, ruination-shendship (Wycliff)

    enliven-stir, (sometimes 'quicken'), awaken, inliven

    future adj.-to-coming/tocoming
    future n.- tocomeness, tocoming

    give life to-quicken, inliven

    hurt-smart, werk/werch

    inane, unintelligent, ignorant-unwitty
    indeed-yea
    indeed seems to be from English in + deed
    insane, mad, frenzied-wood
    insanity, madness-woodness

    judgement-doom, ordeal (in some contexts, esp as in a gerundive sense, i.e the process of judging, trying)

    know (that)-wit; I woat, thou woa(t)st/you wit, he woat, we wit, ye/you wit, they wit

    lodge, accomodate, shelter-harbor

    mental-mindish, mind-, soulish, soul-
    mole-moldwarp/worp

    pain-smart, werk/werch
    patently-openly
    pledge, promise v.-behet
    pledge, promise n.-behest,
    Also, oath, warrant and troth are English (or theadish).
    provoke, agitate, disturb-stir
    psyche-soul
    psychological-soulish, soul-, mindish, mind-
    psychology-soullore/soul-lore
    pure-clean

    security, safety-sickerness, sickerhood
    here "sicker" still seems to come from Latin secur-, as does NHG sicher, Nor. sikker, asf.... any other thoughts?
    silence-stillness
    silent-still
    skill-craft
    spirit-ghost
    spiritual-ghostly, soulish

    truly-yea, warely

    verily-warely
    Truly is English is it not? Or do you think it unenglish though its deals be English?

Similar Threads

  1. Revival of Anglo-Saxon Language
    By Richard in forum Linguistics
    Replies: 24
    Last Post: Monday, April 23rd, 2018, 04:32 AM
  2. Replies: 1
    Last Post: Sunday, April 22nd, 2018, 06:41 AM
  3. Old English Language (Anglo-Saxon)
    By Johannes de León in forum Linguistics
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: Sunday, April 22nd, 2018, 06:27 AM
  4. Is the English Language Not Anglo-Saxon?
    By weland in forum Linguistics
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: Sunday, April 22nd, 2018, 05:33 AM
  5. The English/Anglo-Saxon Fellowship
    By Siegfried in forum The Hearth
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: Sunday, April 22nd, 2018, 05:17 AM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •