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Thread: Holy places of our Folk

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    Re: Holy places of our Folk

    Cerne Abbas

    Cerne Abbas is the site of an Anglo-Saxon abbey, but its history goes back much further. Its main feature the Cerne Giant is actually fairly new, dating to only the 17th centiury. The Giant is the largest chalk figure in Great Britain. A hill fort lies nearby, dating to the Iron Age. Most interesting though, is the myth of a deity being worshipped there, which is covered in some detail by Swain at: http://www.ealdriht.org/helith.html and is also covered at http://www.englishheathenism.homestead.com/helith.html

    There is a spring fed well at the site said to have been created by Augustine's staff, but doubtless musch older, and probably the reason for Heathen worship at the site.

    Cerne Abbas Sites

    http://www.mysteriousbritain.co.uk/m...ne_abbass.html

    http://www.sacredsites.com/europe/en...rne_giant.html

    http://www.pd49.dial.pipex.com/places/wells/silver.htm

    http://www.british-history.ac.uk/rep...p?compid=40139

    http://www.buzzle.com/editorials/10-27-2004-60849.asp

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    Senior Member æþeling's Avatar
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    Re: Holy places of our Folk

    There is a Thorburn’s Cave in the Staffordshire Peaks, just over the border from Derbyshire, I have attended a Blot there. There is also an Odin’s Cave, I believe near Mam Tor. Personally I like any sacred sites on the landscape, like the stone circle at Arbor Low. They are all places where my ancestors may have visited, so they connect me to the land and my forebears.
    Wita sceal geþyldig, ne sceal no to hatheort ne to hrædwyrde, ne to wac wiga ne to wanhydig, ne to forht ne to fægen, ne to feohgifre ne næfre gielpes to georn, ær he geare cunne. Beorn sceal gebidan, þonne he beot spriceð, oþþæt collenferð cunne gearwe hwider hreþra gehygd hweorfan wille.

    http://www.odinic-rite.org/index2.html
    http://www.steadfasttrust.org.uk/

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    Re: Holy places of our Folk

    Quote Originally Posted by æþeling View Post
    There is also an Odin’s Cave, I believe near Mam Tor.

    It's on the maps as "Odin Mine". I've been in it myself, and took a lot of flash photos in the pitch darkness, that had very mysterious swirls of condensation and mist ...
    I'm very suspicious of the name, actually. I don't see how a natural cleft in the rocks, widened into a lead mine in the early modern period, could receive a Scandinavian name, let alone one without the genitive "'s". It is most likely a coincidence, probably involving something like Oak-den. . Of course, this doesn't detract from its natural impressiveness, and spiritual import - lying under what it does.
    Personally I like any sacred sites on the landscape, like the stone circle at Arbor Low. They are all places where my ancestors may have visited, so they connect me to the land and my forebears.
    My own feelings exactly,

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    Quote Originally Posted by ubbe View Post
    And the city of Dokkum were St. Boniface was killed to represent a stand against the foreign christian faith.
    I agree that the spot of St. Boniface's death should be commerated, but not for the reasons you mention.

    Quote Originally Posted by Oswiu View Post
    Having the place of a murder of a prominent Englishman a Holy Site for Our Folk!
    That's not unheard of, the issue is what attitude do you bring here. ubbe wishes to glorify the murder of St. Boniface out of some notion of resistance to the "foreign Christian faith"(nevermind that Germanic pagans freely mixed Christianity with their native religion for several generations before official conversion).

    If you wish to glorify the work of St. Boniface and his self-sacrifice for Christ and the people he wished to convert; then why not?

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