Page 4 of 4 FirstFirst 1234
Results 31 to 35 of 35

Thread: My final thoughts on Nietzsche

  1. #31
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Last Online
    Thursday, August 20th, 2009 @ 12:11 AM
    Ethnicity
    Slavic
    Subrace
    Uralic/Alpine/Pontid mixed
    Country
    United States United States
    Location
    USA
    Gender
    Posts
    3,309
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    2
    Thanked in
    2 Posts

    Re: My final thoughts on Nietzsche

    Karl Jaspers' Nietzsche: An Introduction to the Understanding of His Philosophical Activity is a rather interesting text.

  2. #32
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Last Online
    Thursday, August 20th, 2009 @ 12:11 AM
    Ethnicity
    Slavic
    Subrace
    Uralic/Alpine/Pontid mixed
    Country
    United States United States
    Location
    USA
    Gender
    Posts
    3,309
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    2
    Thanked in
    2 Posts

    Re: My final thoughts on Nietzsche

    I guess to add something more to this discussion. As I somewhat pointed out within my thread about Nietzschean Christianity, Nietzsche's influence has been rather far and wide. People from various ideologies and schools of thought have found inspiration and insight from him. This is true even with many Christian Existentialist thinkers, as I pointed out. There's even been studies into Nietzsche influence on Soviet Communist thinking.

    Nietzsche himself once stated that he wanted to create a new way of thinking, not a new dogma. That's how I choose to approach him.

    So in my view, to try to piegonhold him into one narrow ideological perspective is really a waste of time. Yet sadly we often hear only one variation of Nietzscheanism, and all it ever does is make the man seem incredibly dull and boring. It's time for the other variations of Nietzscheanism to make their mark on the scene.

    If Im also not mistaken, the last thing Nietzsche ever wanted was for people to go ahead and nitpick his every word, trying to decipher what position he really meant and so forth. He'd probably denounce such people, correctly, as "Bible-thumpers"; only the Bible they thump is Thus Spoke Zarathusta as opposed to Holy Scriptures.

    As a Christian, Im not dependent on what Nietzsche advocated per se on this or that issue. Im very much free to regard and/or disregard elements of his philosophy at will pretty much. Im not a dogmatic slave to him.

    Much like how Heideggar and Sartre were not dogmatic slaves to Kierkegaard; they admired his philosophy without adopting his devout Christian faith.

    And perhaps thats how Nietzsche wanted it to be, as he once stated:

    "Now I go alone, my disciples! You, too, go now, alone! Thus I want it.

    Go away from me and resist Zarathustra! And even better: be ashamed of him! Perhaps he deceived you.

    The man of knowledge must not only love his enemies, he must also be able to hate his friends.

    One repays a teacher badly if one always remains nothing but a pupil. And why do you not want to pluck at my wreath?

    You revere me: but what if your reverence tumbles one day? Beware lest a statue slay you!

    You say that you believe in Zarathustra? But what matters Zarathustra! You are my believers, but what matter all believers!

    You had not yet sought yourselves: then you found me. Thus do all believers; therefore all faith amounts to so little.

    Now I bid you lose me and find yourselves; and only when you have all denied me will I return to you ..."


    My two cents.

  3. #33
    Senior Member MockTurtle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Last Online
    Saturday, April 28th, 2012 @ 04:33 AM
    Ethnicity
    Anglo-American
    Ancestry
    Northwestern Europe
    Country
    United States United States
    State
    Washington Washington
    Location
    Pacific NW
    Gender
    Age
    33
    Occupation
    Student
    Politics
    Racialist Free Enterprise
    Religion
    Atheism
    Posts
    462
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    0
    Thanked in
    0 Posts

    Re: My final thoughts on Nietzsche

    Quote Originally Posted by Taras Bulba
    So in my view, to try to piegonhold him into one narrow ideological perspective is really a waste of time.
    Of course, Nietzsche cannot be categorically 'defined', because it was his principal misssion to demonstrate that this very tendency itself often springs from weakness (i.e. the need for "absolutism", etc.). However, he recognized that on a fundamental level such conceptual absolutism was necessary in order to maintain stability (for the general population at least). This is the crucial difference between Nietzsche and more modern philosophers who foolishly praise the breakdown into complete relativism (i.e. "nihilism"). They are forgetting the simple fact that relativism cannot suffice as a foundation for a higher culture. Above all, this was precisely Nietzsche's task: To provide the philosophical underpinnings for the future development of a higher culture after the plague of nihilism has ran its course. Professor Ken Gemes (Birkbeck College) summarizes this very well in his essay "Postmodernism's Use and Abuse of Nietzsche" (an allusion to the essay in "Untimely Meditations"):

    Taken from "Postmodernism's Use and Abuse of Nietzsche," Philosophy and Phenomenological Research (Vol. 62, No. 2, page 339):

    "Nietzsche's use of architectural metaphoric to emphasize the notion of unity as a goal belies Nietzsche's adoption by theorists of postmodern architecture as a disciple of an anti-essentialist decentered pluralism. In contrast to the postmodern reading it will be argued here that Nietzsche's attack on essentialist dogmatic metaphysics is in fact a call to engage in purposive self creation under a unifying will, a will that possesses the strength to reinterpret history as a pathway to the problem that we are. Nietzsche's agrees with the postmodernists that unity is not pre-given, but where he parts from them is in their complete rejection of unity as a goal."
    He mentions a few postmodernists who have already misappropriated Nietzsche in this way (Habermas, Lyotard, etc.). Nietzsche tried to expose the reality of "human agency" in moral systems precisely because he wanted to ultimately create a new one.

  4. #34
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Last Online
    Sunday, November 12th, 2017 @ 06:54 PM
    Ethnicity
    German
    Country
    Germany Germany
    State
    Silesia Silesia
    Gender
    Posts
    853
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    5
    Thanked in
    5 Posts

    Re: My final thoughts on Nietzsche

    Quote Originally Posted by Taras Bulba View Post
    Concerning his remarks about how the only intelligent people in Germany are usually French...
    In a certain way, when it comes to intrigue, to outmanoevering by words, not deeds, the French are more intelligent than the Germans. As can be seen right now from the quarrels about Airbus.
    I remain skeptical. Not to mention he didnt have much love for Prussian militarism either.
    He served in a Prussian mounted artillery regiment. He had volunteered for a Prussian Guard regiment in Berlin but was rejected for his wearing glasses.

    He also volunteered at the outbreak of the German-French War 1870, but was denied military service for his being Swiss national, then. So he served as (civilian) medic instead.

    Still in his "Ecce Homo" he says that he is trained in fighting with two weapons: sabres and cannon.

    I am astonished that you, being so deep in Nietzsche studies, seem not to know that.

  5. #35
    Senior Member MockTurtle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Last Online
    Saturday, April 28th, 2012 @ 04:33 AM
    Ethnicity
    Anglo-American
    Ancestry
    Northwestern Europe
    Country
    United States United States
    State
    Washington Washington
    Location
    Pacific NW
    Gender
    Age
    33
    Occupation
    Student
    Politics
    Racialist Free Enterprise
    Religion
    Atheism
    Posts
    462
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    0
    Thanked in
    0 Posts

    Re: My final thoughts on Nietzsche

    Quote Originally Posted by Spjabork
    In a certain way, when it comes to intrigue, to outmanoevering by words, not deeds, the French are more intelligent than the Germans. As can be seen right now from the quarrels about Airbus.
    I could be mistaken, but I don't really think that Nietzsche intended to make this type of comparison between France and Germany. Nietzsche seems to have admired the French in particular above practically all other European countries, I don't think he's isolating the Germans exclusively in his reasoning. Some very telling writing on this subject can be found in the "Peoples and Countries" section of Beyond Good and Evil (1886):

    254 (Chapter VIII)

    From "Beyond Good and Evil," translation by Helen Zimmern (Chapter VIII, pages 118-119):

    "Even at present France is still the seat of the most intellectual and refined culture of Europe, it is still the high school of taste; but one must know how to find this "France of taste." He who belongs to it keeps himself well concealed: -- they may be a small number in whom it lives and is embodied, besides perhaps being men who do not stand upon the strongest legs, in part fatalists, hypochondriacs, invalids, in part persons over-indulged, over-refined, such as have the ambition to conceal themselves."
    On his description of French taste: as he writes, there exists a general tendency therein to reject modernization (i.e. to avoid over-indulgence into intellectual affairs in order to preserve quality). The acceptance of Schopenhauer fluctuates according to how strong this tendency remains, and the weaker it becomes the more Schopenhauer is "at home" (his words). True, he is somewhat critical of the Germans in his descriptions, but his critical eye is not limited to them. Plus, his main quarrel is with the problem of modernization itself.

    In this same passage he continues on and discusses three traits that the French possess which he thinks is proof of their overall cultural and/or intellectual supremacy in Europe as a whole. (Emphasis in the following is not mine):

    "Beyond Good and Evil," page 120:

    "There is yet a third claim to superiority: in the French character there is a successful half-way synthesis of the North and South, which makes them comprehend many things, and enjoins upon them other things, which an Englishman can never comprehend. Their temperament, turned alternately to and from the South, in which from time to time the Provencal and Ligurian blood froths over, preserves them from the dreadful, northern grey-in-grey, from sunless conceptual spectrism and from poverty of blood -- our German infirmity of taste, for the excessive prevalence of which at the present moment, blood and iron, that is to say "high politics," has with great resolution been prescribed (according to a dangerous healing art, which bids me wait and wait, but not yet hope)."
    I suppose this point is related to his considerations for "pan-Europeanism" (as it can pretty accurately be described). However, his opinions on German(y) seem to have oscillated quite a bit. For instance, consider his remarks in Ecce Homo (1889), and also his overall praise for German musical prowess altogether.

Page 4 of 4 FirstFirst 1234

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 3
    Last Post: Wednesday, July 11th, 2012, 02:02 AM
  2. Hitler's Final Thoughts On WW2 ...
    By SaxonPagan in forum Modern Age & Contemporary History
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: Saturday, October 16th, 2010, 01:04 AM
  3. Replies: 13
    Last Post: Thursday, November 20th, 2003, 11:44 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •