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Thread: The Alma "Wild Man": Undiscovered Hominid, or Myth?

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    The Alma "Wild Man": Undiscovered Hominid, or Myth?

    This thread is dedicated to debate the existence, and classification (should existence now, or in the recent past, be proven probable) of the Alma, or "Wild Man" of central Asia. For those of you unfamiliar with the Alma, the articles below should give you some background for the impending discussion.

    Encounters:
    In central Asia, in what, until a few years ago was the Soviet Union, there are stories of a large, ape-like creature that inhabits the mountains. It goes by the name of the Alma.

    Unlike the better known Bigfoot and Yeti, reports about the Alma say that the creature is much more of a rough, hairy human than an ape. Professor Boris Porchnev, of the Moscow Academy of Sciences, published a description of the creature based on detailed stories he'd gathered from people who had seen it.

    "There is no underlayer of hair so that the skin can sometimes be seen," says the report. "The head rises to a cone-shaped peak," it continues, and "the teeth are like a man's, but larger, with the canines more widely separated." Porchnev's description also noted that the Alma can run as fast as a horse and swim in swift currents. Breeding pairs remain together living in holes in the ground. For food they eat small animals and vegetables. The creatures are mainly active at night. The report also noted that the animals have a "distasteful smell."

    The first stories of the Alma were gathered in 1881 by N. M. Pzewalski, a traveler in Mongolia who also discovered the Mongolian wild horse. During the Second World War refugees, soldiers, and prisoners of war, often reported seeing the Alma. Slavomir Rawicz, in his book The Long Walk, the story of his escape from a Siberian labor camp, tells of being delayed by a pair of Almas. Chinese soldiers reportedly put food out for the Alma and watched it eat.

    M.A. Stonin, a geologist, was prospecting near Tien Shan in 1948. One morning he awoke to cries by his guides that the horses were being stolen. Stonin grabbed his rifle and headed outside to find a figure standing by the horses. It had long red-hair all over it's body. The creature moved off at Stonin's shouts and he chased after it. The animal was so man-like, though, that Stonin couldn't bring himself to shoot it and the thing escaped.

    In 1957 a hydrologist named Alexander G. Pronin, on an expedition to study water resources, reported seeing "a being of unusual aspect." It stood at a distance in the snow with it's legs wide apart and with arms longer than a normal man's. Pronin watched it for five minutes, then the creature disappeared behind a rock. Three days later he saw the figure again briefly. Then a week later one of the group's inflatable boats disappeared without explanation and was later found upstream. Pronin found out that the locals often blamed the "wild man" with stealing household items and taking them into the mountains. This made Pronin wonder if the Alma was responsible for the missing boat.

    Alma's have reportedly been shot and killed, but the carcasses have never been examined by scientists. In 1937, during a clash with the Japanese, a Russian reconnaissance unit in Mongolia spotted two silhouettes coming down a hill toward them. When the figures did not respond to a challenge, sentries shot them. Then next morning the recon unit was surprised when they examined the bodies. They were of a "strange anthropoid ape" that was about the size of a man and covered with long red hair. Unfortunately, because of the war, the bodies could not be returned to Moscow for a proper evaluation.

    While the Soviet Union was still together several expeditions were mounted to look for the Alma. While they gathered some interesting stories, and a few unusual artifacts, no Alma was ever captured and Soviet scientists became split over the value of searching for it. Dr. Proshnev took quite a ribbing from his colleagues because of his work on the subject.

    Proshnev speculated that the creature is perhaps the last surviving group of Neanderthal men. At least a few western researchers, including Dr. Myra Shackely, of Leicester University in England, agree with him. Shackely, who visited Mongolia in 1979, points out that the entire area is loaded with Neanderthal artifacts. She notes that if Neanderthal were to have survived it would most likely have been in those areas were the Alma is reported.
    Since the dismemberment of the Soviet Union little has been done to continue research on the Alma. Those regions were it has been reported are often politically unstable, and economic conditions in Russia, who inherited many of the scientific institutions of the old Soviet Union, have not been favorable to allowing continued research on the "Wild Man."
    Source: http://www.unmuseum.org/alma.htm


    Alma General:
    The Sasquatch and the Yeti, from the descriptions available, are large and very ape-like. But there is another wildman, the Almas, which seems smaller and more human. Reports of the Almas are concentrated in an area extending from Mongolia in the north, south through the Pamirs, and then westward into the Caucasus region. Similar reports come from Siberia and the far north-east parts of the Russian republic.

    Early in the fifteenth century, Hans Schiltenberger was captured by the Turks and sent to the court of Tamerlane, who placed him in the retinue of a Mongol prince named Egidi. After returning to Europe in 1427, Schiltenberger wrote about his experiences. In his book, he described some mountains, apparently the Tien Shan range in Mongolia: "The inhabitants say that beyond the mountains is the beginning of a wasteland which lies at the edge of the earth. No one can survive there because the desert is populated by so many snakes and tigers. In the mountains themselves live wild people, who have nothing in common with other human beings. A pelt covers the entire body of these creatures. Only the hands and face are free of hair. They run around in the hills like animals and eat foliage and grass and whatever else they can find. The lord of the territory made Egidi a present of a couple of forest people, a man and a woman. They had been caught in the wilderness, together with three untamed horses the size of asses and all sorts of other animals which are not found in German lands and which I cannot therefore put a name to" (Shackley 1983, p. 93).

    Myra Shackley (1983, pp. 93-94) found Schiltenberger's account especially credible for two reasons: "First, Schiltenberger reports that he saw the creatures with his own eyes. Secondly, he refers to Przewalski horses, which were only rediscovered by Nicholai Przewalski in 1881....Przewalski himself saw 'wildmen' in Mongolia in 1871."

    A drawing of an Almas is found in a nineteenth-century Mongol compendium of medicines derived from various plants and animals. The text next to the picture reads: "The wildman lives in the mountains, his origins close to that of the bear, his body resembles that of man, and he has enormous strength. His meat may be eaten to treat mental diseases and his gall cures jaundice" (Shackley 1983, p. 98).

    Shackley (1983, p. 98) noted: "The book contains thousands of illustrations of various classes of animals (reptiles, mammals and amphibia), but not one single mythological animal such as are known from similar medieval European books. All the creatures are living and observable today. There seems no reason at all to suggest that the Almas did not exist also and illustrations seem to suggest that it was found among rocky habitats, in the mountains."
    In 1937, Dordji Meiren, a member of the Mongolian Academy of Sciences, saw the skin of an Almas in a monastery in the Gobi desert. The lamas were using it as a carpet in some of their rituals. Shackley (1983, pp. 103-104) stated: "The hairs on the skin were reddish and curly....The features [of the face] were hairless, the face had eyebrows, and the head still had long disordered hair. Fingers and toes were in a good state of preservation and the nails were similar to human nails."

    A report of a more recent sighting of live wildmen was related to Myra Shackley by Dmitri Bayanov, of the Darwin Museum in Moscow. In 1963, Ivan Ivlov, a Russian pediatrician, was traveling through the Altai mountains in the southern part of Mongolia. Ivlov saw several humanlike creatures standing on a mountain slope. They appeared to be a family group, composed of a male, female, and child. Ivlov observed the creatures through his binoculars from a distance of half a mile until they moved out of his field of vision. His Mongolian driver also saw them and said they were common in that area. Shackley (1983, p. 91) stated: "So we are not dealing with folktales or local legends, but with an event that was recorded by a trained scientist and transmitted to the proper authorities. There is no reason to doubt Ivlov's word, partly because of his impeccable scientific reputation and partly because, although he had heard local stories about these creatures he had remained sceptical about their existence."

    After his encounter with the Almas family, Ivlov interviewed many Mongolian children, believing they would be more candid than adults. The children provided many additional reports about the Almas. For example, one child told Ivlov that while he and some other children were swimming in a stream, he saw a male Almas carry a child Almas across it (Shackley 1983, pp. 91-92).

    In 1980, a worker at an experimental agricultural station, operated by the Mongolian Academy of Sciences at Bulgan, encountered the dead body of a wildman: "I approached and saw a hairy corpse of a robust humanlike creature dried and half-buried by sand. I had never seen such a humanlike being before covered by camel-colour brownish-yellow short hairs and I recoiled, although in my native land in Sinkiang I had seen many dead men killed in battle. ... The dead thing was not a bear or ape and at the same time it was not a man like Mongol or Kazakh or Chinese and Russian. The hairs of its head were longer than on its body" (Shackley 1983, p. 107).

    The Pamir mountains, lying in a remote region where the borders of Tadzhikistan, China, Kashmir, and Afghanistan meet, have been the scene of many Almas sightings. In 1925, Mikhail Stephanovitch Topilski, a major general in the Soviet army, led his unit in an assault on an anti-Soviet guerilla force hiding in a cave in the Pamirs. One of the surviving guerillas said that while in the cave he and his comrades were attacked by several apelike creatures. Topilski ordered the rubble of the cave searched, and the body of one such creature was found. Topilski reported (Shackley 1983, pp. 118-119): "At first glance I thought the body was that of an ape. It was covered with hair all over. But I knew there were no apes in the Pamirs. Also, the body itself looked very much like that of a man. We tried pulling the hair, to see if it was just a hide used for disguise, but found that it was the creature's own natural hair. We turned the body over several times on its back and its front, and measured it. Our doctor made a long and thorough inspection of the body, and it was clearthat it was not a human being."

    "The body," continued Topilski, "belonged to a male creature 165-170cm [about 5 1/2 feet] tall, elderly or even old,judging by the greyish colour of the hair in several places. The chest was covered with brownish hair and the belly with greyish hair. The hair was longer but sparser on the chest and close-cropped and thick on the belly. In general the hair was very thick, without any underfur. There was least hair on the buttocks, from which fact our doctor deduced that the creature sat like a human being. There was most hair on the hips. The knees were completely bare of hair and had callous growths on them. The whole foot including the sole was quite hairless and was covered by hard brown skin. The hair got thinner near the hand, and the palms had none at all but only callous skin."

    Topilski added: "The colour of the face was dark, and the creature had neither beard nor moustache. The temples were bald and the back of the head was covered by thick, matted hair. The dead creature lay with its eyes open and its teeth bared. The eyes were dark and the teeth were large and even and shaped like human teeth. The forehead was slanting and the eyebrows were very powerful. The protruding jawbones made the face resemble the Mongol type of face. The nose was flat, with a deeply sunk bridge. The ears were hairless and looked a little more pointed than a human being's with a longer lobe. The lower jaw was very massive. The creature had a very powerful chest and well developed muscles.... The arms were of normal length, the hands were slightly wider and the feet much wider and shorter than man's."

    In 1957, Alexander Georgievitch Pronin, a hydrologist at the Geographical Research Institute of Leningrad University, participated in an expedition to the Pamirs, for the purpose of mapping glaciers. On August 2, 1957, while his team was investigating the Fedchenko glacier, Pronin hiked into the valley of the Balyandkiik River. Shackley (1983, p. 120) stated: "at noon he noticed a figure standing on a rocky cliff about 500 yards above him and the same distance away. His first reaction was surprise, since this area was known to be uninhabited, and his second was that the creature was not human. It resembled a man but was very stooped. He watched the stocky figure move across the snow, keeping its feet wide apart, and he noted that its forearms were longer than a human's and it was covered with reddish grey hair." Pronin saw the creature again three days later, walking upright. Since this incident, there have been numerous wildman sightings in the Pamirs, and members of various expeditions have photographed and taken casts of footprints (Shackley 1983, pp. 122-126).

    We shall now consider reports about the Almas from the Caucasus region. According to testimony from villagers of Tkhina, on the Mokvi River, a female Almas was captured there during the nineteenth century, in the forests of Mt. Zaadan. For three years, she was kept imprisoned, but then became domesticated and was allowed to live in a house. She was called Zana. Shackley (1983, p. 112) stated: "Her skin was a greyish-black colour, covered with reddish hair, longer on her head than elsewhere. She was capable of inarticulate cries but never developed a language. She had a large face with big cheek bones, muzzle-like prognathous jaw and large eyebrows, big white teeth and a fierce expression." Eventually Zana, through sexual relations with a villager, had children. Some of Zana's grandchildren were seen by Boris Porshnev in 1964. In her account of Porshnev's investigations, Shackley (1983, p. 113) noted: '"The grandchildren, Chalikoua and Taia, had darkish skin of rather negroid appearance, with very prominent chewing muscles and extra strongjaws." Porshnev also interviewed villagers who as children had been present at Zana's funeral in the 1880s.

    In the Caucasus region, the Almas is sometimes called Biaban-guli. In 1899, K. A. Satunin, a Russian zoologist, spotted a female Biaban-guli in the Talysh hills of the southern Caucasus. He stated that the creature had "fully human movements" (Shackley 1983, p. 109). The fact that Satunin was a well-known zoologist makes his report particularly significant.

    In 1941, V. S. Karapetyan, a lieutenant colonel of the medical service of the Soviet army, performed a direct physical examination of a living wildman captured in the Dagestan autonomous republic, just north of the Caucasus mountains. Karapetyan said: "I entered a shed with two members of the local authorities. When I asked why I had to examine the man in a cold shed and not in a warm room, I was told that the prisoner could not be kept in a warm room. He had sweated in the house so profusely that they had had to keep him in the shed. I can still see the creature as it stood before me, a male, naked and barefooted. And it was doubtlessly a man, because its entire shape was human. The chest, back, and shoulders, however, were covered with shaggy hair of a dark brown colour. This fur of his was much like that of a bear, and 2 to 3 centimeters [1 inch] long. The fur was thinner and softer below the chest. His wrists were crude and sparsely covered with hair. The palms of his hands and soles of his feet were free of hair. But the hair on his head reached to his shoulders partly covering his forehead. The hair on his head, moreover, felt very rough to the hand. He had no beard or moustache, though his face was completely covered with a light growth of hair. The hair around his mouth was also short and sparse. The man stood absolutely straight with his arms hanging, and his height was above the average — about 180 cm [almost 5 feet 11 inches]. He stood before me like a giant, his mighty chest thrust forward. His fingers were thick, strong and exceptionally large. On the whole, he was considerably bigger than any of the local inhabitants. His eyes told me nothing. They were dull and empty — the eyes of an animal. And he seemed to me like an animal and nothing more" (Sanderson 1961, pp. 295-296). Significantly, the creature had lice of a kind different from those that infect humans. It is reports like this that have led scientists such as British anthropologist Myra Shackley and Soviet anatomist Dr. Zh. I. Kofman to conclude that the Almas may represent a relict population of Neanderthals or perhaps even Homo erectus (Shackley 1983, p. 114). What happened to the wildman of Dagestan? According to published accounts, he was shot by his Soviet military captors as they retreated before the advancing German army.

    In the 1950s, Yu. I. Merezhinski, senior lecturer in the department of ethnography and anthropology at Kiev University, was doing research in Azerbaijan, in the northern part of the Caucasus region. From local people, Merezhinski heard reports of an Almas-like wildman called the Kaptar. Khadzi Magoma, an expert hunter, told Merezhinski that he would take him to a stream where the Kaptar sometimes bathed at night. In exchange, the hunter asked Merezhinski to take a flash photo of the creature for him. Merezhinski agreed, and they went to the stream, near which a few albino Kaptars were said to live. Shackley (1983, p. 110) stated: "sure enough Merezhinski saw one from a distance of only a few yards, clearly discernible on the river bank through the bushes. It was damp, lean and covered from head to foot with white hair. Unfortunately the reality of the creature was too much for Merezhinski, who instead of photographing it shot at it with his revolver but missed in his excitement. The old hunter, furious at the deception, refused to repeat the experiment."

    Here once more we have a report by a professional scientist who directly observed a wildman. As an anthropologist, Merezhinski was particularly well qualified to evaluate what he saw. It is reports like this that tend to dispel the charge that the Almas is a creature that exists only in folklore.
    And as far as folklore is concerned, accounts of the Almas and other wildmen are not necessarily a sign that the Almas is imaginary. Dmitri Bayanov, of the Darwin Museum in Moscow, asked (1982, p. 47): "Is the abundant folklore, say, about the wolf or the bear not a consequence of the existence of these animals and man's knowledge of them?" Bayanov (1982, p. 47) added: "Therefore we say that, if relic hominoids were not reflected in folklore and mythology, then their reality can be called into question."


    Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alma_(cryptozoology)

    The Story of Zana:
    In the 1880s a strange woman - later given the name Zana or Zanya - with features of both mongoloid and negroid extraction was captured in the western Caucausus region of Abkhazia. Here hoinoids are known as abnuaaya. Her exotic features were enough to describe her as unusual, but it was her coat of reddish-black hair, which covered her from head to foot and her physically imposing body which made her even more extraordinary. She was powerful enough to actually outrun horses and was able to easily swim swift-flowing rivers.

    In captivity Zana was passed on to a successor of owners commencing with Prince D.M. Achaba, titular head of the Zaadan region, and then ultimately into the hands of a nobleman, Edgi Genaba, from Tkhina on the Mokva River. The bizarre hominoid was well-treated by her master who taught her simple tasks to perform around the farm. However, she was less well-treated by the immoral men of the neighbouring area who took advantage of Zana's ignorance and fathered several children. These progeny were fairly normal except all were dark and physically powerful. One son had the power to lift a man on a chair off the ground by means of his powerful jaws. Unlike their mother, Zana's children turned out to be quite talented with one son an accomplished pianist.

    Porshnev and his successors Dimitri Bayanov and Igor Bourtsev attempted to locate Zana's grave in a bid to examine her remains for clues her origins, but were unable to locate the final resting place. However, they did manage to excavate the grave of her youngest son Khwit and took the skull of the dead man to Moscow for examination at the Moscow State University Institute of Anthropology.

    An anthropologist M.A. Kolodievea, noted Khwit's skull was significantly different from that of other Abkhazis. She writes in Bayanov's In the Footsteps of the Russian Snowman:

    The Tkhina skull exhibits an original combination of modern and ancient features ... The facil section of the skull is significantly larger in comparison with the mean Abkhaz type ... all the measurements and indices of the supercilliary cranial contour are greater not only than those of the mean Abkhaz series: but also than those of the maximum size of some fossil skulls studied 9or rather were comparable with the latter). The Tkhina skull approaches thee Neolitihic Vovnigi II skulls of the fossil series...

    Another anthropolgist M. M. Gerasiomva set down her thoughts on the Khwit skull structure as follows:

    The skull discloses a great deal of peculiarity, a certain disharmony, disequilibirum in its features, very large dimensions of the facial skeleton, increased development of the contour of the skull, the specificity of the non-metric features (the two foramina mentale in the lower jaw, the intrusive bones in the sagittal suture, and the Inca bone). The skull merits further extended study.

    Bayanov and Bourtsev are at the forefront of investigations into the identity of these hairy hominids of Russia which have come to be known as Kaptars and Almas depending upon the geographical location in which they are to be found.

    They are generally found in mountainous areas like the Caucuses, Pamirs and Tien Shans where the human population is sparse and there are large areas where few humans ever ventured. Usually described as being quite hirsute, Almas and Kaptars appear to have slightly slanting eyes which give them rather mongoloid features, although they are also described as appearing to be almost negroid at times. There physiology is described as powerful and although they are of normal human height they appear much stronger.

    Their facial features consist of prominent eyebrows, recessed eyes, backward sloping forehead, conical skull, short neck and a very powerful jaw structure. The females of the species have very long breasts which have to be slung over the shoulder when in the running mode. When seen to be asleep, witnesses of the Alma phenomenon have stated that the hominids In appearance they closely resemble Neanderthals and there has been much speculation as to whether Almas are indeed relic pockets of this type of human. With recent scientific findings showing that man and Neanderthals have substantial differences in their DNA structures, tear ducts and nasal cavities it is plausible that the Almas may indeed be surviving Neanderthals.
    In the case of Zana's story one must ask themselves first, did such a 'women' exist and procreate, and second was she perhaps a feral, handicapped, mute, whose appearance has been exaggerated, or an Alma. The recentness of the story, and living decedents, suggests that there was such a 'women' captured and 'tamed' in the region who did reproduce. I would really like to see a DNA analysis of her supposed descendants, perhaps from her sons' bones...

    Well, the subject is open for discussion, The Alma: Undiscovered Hominid, or Myth?
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    Post Re: The Alma: Undiscovered Hominid, or Myth?

    I think the idea is very attractive...(The Alma: Undiscovered Hominid)
    And that is my greatest reason to not really believe it unless I see/hear evidence.

    My biggest remark is how they, when living in small communities in harsh mountainous areas, didn't extinct because of inbreeding.

    I can easily believe however that during a longer time than now is proven Neanderthals lived alongside Sapiens, I mean it's a matter of a few years that there will be found Neanderthal bonefragments dating less than current 25.000 yrs.

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    Post Re: The Alma: Undiscovered Hominid, or Myth?

    I believe it could be possible,someday we will be able to take the strength from the dna and give it to our species for "super-human" soldiers and etc. haha maybe. imagine a blond blue eyed bear like human well educated and armed.

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    Post Re: The Alma: Undiscovered Hominid, or Myth?

    At this link there are two pictures of the alleged skull of Zana's son, Khwit.

    Curious story for certain!

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    Re: The Alma: Undiscovered Hominid, or Myth?

    This skull certainly is flat sided and the forehead is very, very low while there is thickening in the frontal area just about the eyes which seems rather primitive but there are sapiens skulls, such as Predmost, with look even more primitive. He died in 1954. Why aren't the Russians doing DNA using tooth pulp?

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    Re: The Alma: Undiscovered Hominid, or Myth?

    Quote Originally Posted by Dr. Solar Wolff
    He died in 1954. Why aren't the Russians doing DNA using tooth pulp?
    What? And let the Americans, or even worse the Chinese, get a headstart in the Primitive-Hominid-Army Race?

    This stuff's fascinating, but I daren't go on the record one way or another!

    About Slawomir Rawicz's account of the Yetis in the Long Walk; I read that a few months ago. Rings very true...

    Why's nobody suggested that these sightings are merely ghosts of hominids?

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    I personally have no doubt that there were hominids that lingered on for eons in hidden and far flung places, typically areas that would not have been suitable for early agriculture. In Europe that would be the inner Caucuses, swaths of Scandinavia, and the dense forests of Eastern Europe. IMO many legends of trolls, ogres, and goblins may even be faint folk memories of such species.

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    Sounds like a Bigfoot. One of the people I know online says his kids leave fruit baskets out for them.

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