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Thread: Currently Reading

  1. #2081
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    Quote Originally Posted by KYAnglo View Post
    Oxford History of Britain. I've made it to the Georgian period, "Mad" George III, last king to reign over these former colonies, to be exact.
    Which series? I wanted to get the original series, which is no longer in print, out of concerns the new series is intended to be politically correct. I've seen the complete original series available for $300-400.

    Quote Originally Posted by Rĉdwald View Post
    The Idiot by Dostoevsky. Very very slowly as I'm often too lazy to read and get bogged down with work and other hobbies these days.
    Hmm, never did finish this. Got to part II and stopped. Only just picked it up again the other day. I was reading whatever translation was available on Project Gutenberg, but picked up the newer Pevear/Volokhonsky translation to finish on. Much better so far. I had a hard time originally following the alternative use of names for some reason, switching between Mrs. Epanchin and Lizaveta Prokofyevna. I didn't have this problem at all with Crime and Punishment.

    My reading really dropped off to almost nil around the time that I finished my education. Before that I would probably read a 300 page book ever 4-7 days, year round. I think the year I read Crime and Punishment I probably only read one other book. A bit depressing to reflect on really; wage work kind of stole a piece of my soul in this way, but such is life. 2 years back I started making a serious effort to read more, and I've managed to get close to my old reading pace.

    Here are some of the key ones I remember right now from the past couple years.

    Capitalist Realism: Is There No Alternative? - Mark Fisher. This was a great little book (~80 pages) analysing the modern problem of neoliberal capitalism from someone from the modern post-Marxist camp. It's a great read with some wonderful criticisms of our modern system. The analogy of modern society to something like dealing with a call centre, and the way capitalism has a way of reincorporating and monetising its own discontents back into itself is excellent. It draws heavily on Zizek and Baudrillard, expanding/exploring some of the 'hyperreal'.

    Mein Kampf - Thomas Dalton's new English translation of both volumes. This was much better than the Murphy translation I read in university. It helps that Thomas Dalton himself is largely a proponent of Hitler's ideas and provides copious amounts of relevant footnotes in the translation. Obviously a must-read for anyone who has ideas resembling NS in any way. Provides a lot in the way of the methodology that Hitler would exploit to achieve electoral success in Germany, a history of the late 19th/early 20th century nationalist movement in Germany and specifically Austria, and an easy to read overview of the guiding philosophy of the NSDAP. Thomas Dalton is a regular contributor to The Occidental Observer (Kevin MacDonald's publication), and has translated many other works from the period. I purchased almost his entire catalogue at the time, well worth it.

    Eternal Strangers: Critical Views of Jews and Judaism through the Ages - Thomas Dalton. A relatively brief work (~160 pages) summing up some of the "greatest hits" of critical intellectual thought on the Jews and their religion, as the title suggests. It's ordered chronologically, which helps with a critical understanding of the eternal enemy since the first time they really appeared on the Western scene, in the Hellenistic era and Roman periods. It's amusing to see opinions from Tacitus to Mark Twain on the chosen people.

    The Jewish Hand in the World Wars - Thomas Dalton. Enough said, really. Brief (~160 pages) chronology of Jewish mechanics behind driving the Anglosphere into war with Germany, twice. Some of the history on the issues between the Russian Empire and the United States were new to me.

    My Life - Oswald Mosley. Pretty interesting overview of the life and times of Oswald Mosley and to a lesser extent the British Fascist movement. Secondarily interesting for its insight into life among the well-to-do in early 20th century Britain, and some of the domestic political issues facing the country at the time.

    Anglo-Celtic Australia: Colonial Immigration and Cultural Regionalism. Basically an anthropological study of the ancestry of the modern Australian population. Should probably be mandatory reading for any Australian who considers themselves an ethno-nationalist. The basic conclusion is the majority of Australia's population is of English ancestry, growing up under an established Londoner culture. I don't know what woodwork all these "German-Australians" crawl out from

    Decline of the West - Spengler. Re-read this again after about 10 years. Kind of a slog. On the must-read list but most people would probably be fine with the abridged edition. Aside, one thing I found funny was Spengler's critique of theorists without the ability to bring it into practice, considering he was kind of an autist like Evola who couldn't bring himself to offer anything to the actual movement around him because of his being too niche.

    Imperium - Yockey. I actually think this work is a bit better for those in our milieu than the aforementioned work, which Yockey consciously wrote it as a successor to. I think it even has a better summary of Schmitt's "friend-enemy distinction" than he outlines in Concept of the Political (still a must-read). One of my favourite political works and I think everyone in the dissident sphere should be familiar with Yockey. Yockey: A Fascist Odyssey by Kerry Bolton is a good book on the life of this individual, which is really quite bizarre and insightful into post-WWII fascistic politics.

    Stalin: The Enduring Legacy - Kerry Bolton. This is a fascinating, brief summary on the development of the USSR into more of a "Red Fascist" state in the Stalin years. Some key things of interest were the activities of Zhdanov and "rootless cosmopolitan", Trotsky/trotskyite warm reception in the capitalist USA, prohibition against modernist art, Stalin's attitudes towards the East German state and integration of ex-NS into Stalinism. People who insist on calling our enemy today "communism" really should read this book and gain insight into how capitalism really started to evolve into the worse of these two main ideologies in the latter half of the Cold War.

    Napoleon - Andrew Roberts. Great biography of the man; Napoleon's life reads better than fiction. Contains a nice balance of information on the political, personal and military campaigns of the man. Almost has you in tears towards the end. It's actually fascinating this man was able to sit down and converse with Goethe about all manner of topics. Such leaders are long gone.

    "Our God is Your God Too, But He Has Chosen Us": Essays on Jewish Power - Laurent Guyénot. This book basically killed Christianity to me forever. I don't know how you could read this and Myth of the 20th Century and keep faith.

    Why Islam Makes You Stupid... But Also Means You'll Conquer The World - Edward Dutton & John Derbyshire. Dutton is a professor and regular contributor to Radix, so he's /ourguy/. This one had a lot of good information on how what seem like dysgenic practices encouraged by Islam actually lend to preserving their communities. It's an objective look rather than some ridiculous "White sharia" thing. Has some interesting stuff towards the end on how a combinaton of the industrial revolution and growing irreligion has led in large part to the issues we have in the West today.
    If only you knew how bad things really are

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  3. #2082
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    "Surviving in a great war - the memories of an infantry soldier." The memoirs of a Flemish soldier from 1914-1918.
    “As brothers and sisters we knew instinctively that if we were going to stand in darkness, best we stand in a darkness we had made ourselves.” - Douglas Coupland

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    https://www.cornellpress.cornell.edu...rt/#bookTabs=1


    "Anglo-Saxon Art" by Leslie Webster.
    "Almost every name belongs to well-known families of English stock....these soldiers were of ancient American lineage"- Prof. N.S. Shaler on the 1st Kentucky "Orphan" Brigade, Confederate States Army

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    I forgot to add the book Princes of the Yen, by German economist Prof. Richard Werner. This is actually an amazing book that anyone interested in "third way" economics has to read. The basic premise the book proves is that central bank credit creation is the primary driver of an economy in a modern industrialised society. This is proved by an extremely in-depth study of the Japanese economy in the post-WWII period. This fact was kept under wraps by Japan's brilliant Kwantung Army economists and the inability of the Japanese Ministry of Finance to utilise this and deal with the increasingly independent Bank of Japan (due to American influence) is what led to the Japanese "Lost Generation"; a period of economic stagnation causing large social stress within Japan beginning in 1991 to the present day. What is interesting about the book, besides the thesis, is that Werner himself is an accomplished economist with a very impressive CV, yet in his book he cites Hjalmar Schacht and the Reichsbank laws passed under Adolf Hitler as the basis of the economic model that Japan adopted during and after WWII up to the late '80s (leading to the Japanese miracle). The book is actually fuel for anyone who believes in banker conspiracies, but is empirical. In essence, this book is a study in fascist economics, but not from the typical self-educated people from our camp with a poor understanding and poorer ability to share their own theories. The book even involves case studies in other countries like Korea, Thailand, Indonesia and Malaysia and how the same things played out there to varying degrees.

    I read the original, 2003 edition of the book. Which is, perhaps not so strangely, only available on Amazon for almost $1000. There is a new edition available, but only from an obscure publisher in England. Definitely seems to be "soft" suppression.

    There is also a decent amateur documentary summarising some of the key points of the book available on YouTube. I still recommend the book more.

    If only you knew how bad things really are

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    Reading this work by Venerable Bede. I was reading about religions and the biblical faith in general, that's when I chanced on this book and deep-dived into it.
    And I'm re-reading some of Shakespeare's. Right now I'm reading Othello.
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    Also, Moors in Spain by Stanley Lane. Continuation to my interest in the biblical faith. Reading the history of moors helps understand the present-day fault lines in Europe.

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